The Conversation (1974) Movie Script

I want to go over to my place
and start, you know, getting it on,
'cause I'm just tired of this all.
- Oh, that's terrible.
- Yeah.
Did you ever take ballet?
Weak ankles.
Do you have a quarter for them?
Yes, I do.
Well, what about me?
You'll see.
A lot of fun you are.
You're supposed to tease me,
give me hints, make me guess, you know.
Oh, look. That's terrible.
He's not hurting anyone.
Neither are we.
Oh, God.
Every time I see one of those old guys,
I always think the same thing.
What do you think?
I always think that he was once
somebody's baby boy.
Really, I do.
I think he was once somebody's baby boy,
and he had a mother
and a father who loved him.
And now there he is,
half-dead on a park bench,
and where are his mother or his father,
all his uncles now?
Anyway, that's what I always think.
How's he doing up there?
I always think how,
when they had the newspaper strike...
We're getting better than 40%.
How about the second position?
It's not so good.
What have we here?
Okay, come on, you little babies,
now, wet your lips there.
All right, give me some tongue.
Just give me a little tongue there.
Come on.
Come on, just a little tongue outside.
Nice, wet French kiss now.
Come on, a nice wet one there.
Come on, come on.
Pay attention to your recordings.
She's coming in loud and clear.
Look, Mark. Do you see him?
The man with the hearing aid like Charles?
- No. Where?
- Right there, with the shopping bag.
Well, that's it for Paul. They spotted him.
Give me the phones.
He's been following us all around,
and he's following us close.
It's nothing. Don't worry about it.
We're spending too much time
together here.
No. Let's stay just a little longer.
I got burned, Harry.
- Yeah.
- She looked at me.
Yeah, yeah, I know. We heard.
Oh, did we hear.
What do you think?
I got some good pieces, maybe 25%.
Oh, yeah?
Listen, Paul, I'll call you in a couple of days
if I need you again, okay?
Hey, Paul, you going
to the convention tomorrow?
You bet.
Hey, how about you, Harry?
Yeah. Maybe.
Little party like we did two years ago, huh?
Hey, Stan?
- I'll see.
- Okay.
Here.
He's a nice guy for a cop.
You go.
I'll stay here a while.
Who's interested in these two anyway?
I don't know for sure.
- The Justice Department?
- No.
I figure it must be the Infernal Revenue.
Their tapes always put me to sleep.
Since when are you here
to be entertained? Here.
Sometimes it's nice to know
what they're talking about.
I don't care what they're talking about.
All I want is a nice, fat recording.
Hello, Mr. Caul.
And happy birthday!
Happy birthday, Harry.
Happy birthday.
Hello.
Hello, Miss Evangelista?
Yes. This is Harry Caul from upstairs.
Yes. Well...
Thank you very much. Thank you.
Yes, well, you're really very nice.
Yes.
But...
I know...
Yes, I found it. Yes.
But what I wanted to talk to you about was,
how did you put it in the apartment?
Right.
Well, what about the alarm?
Oh, you did?
Well, yes, I thought I had the only key.
Well, what emergency could possibly...
All right. Yes.
Well, see, I would be perfectly happy
to have all my personal things
burned up in a fire
because I don't have anything personal.
Nothing of value.
No. Nothing personal except my keys,
you see.
Yes. Which I really would like
to have the only copy of, Miss Evangelista.
Miss Evangelista, how'd you know
it was my birthday?
Nah. I don't remember telling you.
Would you like to take a guess
how old I am?
Forty-four. Well, that's a very good guess.
Miss Evangelista, as of today,
my mail will go to a post office box
with a combination on it and no keys.
Good-bye.
Hey, Harry.
Morning.
Hey, man, there's an article in here
about the convention.
- It mentions your name.
- Oh, yeah?
Yeah. You're one of the notables
who's going tomorrow night,
did you know that?
Yeah. I told them I'd be there.
Listen to this here.
Listen.
"Among those pre-eminent in the field
expected to attend
"are Hal Lipsett and Harry Caul
from San Francisco.
"Kenneth Sperry will speak
on Surveillance and The Law."
Wait a minute. Listen to this.
Where the hell is it?
"Also attending will be
William P. Moran of Detroit, Michigan."
Since when did
William P. Moran of Detroit, Michigan
become pre-eminent in the field?
Oh, he's very big there.
You want some coffee?
He's the guy that told Chrysler
that Cadillac was getting rid of its fins.
It was a while ago,
but it was a big thing at the time.
December 2nd, 1:00 p.m.
Shopping bag, Unit A.
December 2nd, 1:00 p.m. Parabolic, Unit B.
December 2nd, 1:00 p.m.
City of Paris, Unit C.
What do you think?
I don't know what I'm going
to get him for Christmas yet.
He's already got everything.
He doesn't need anything anymore.
Well, I haven't decided
what I'm going to get you yet.
...get him for Christmas yet.
He's already got everything.
He doesn't need anything anymore.
Well, I haven't decided
what I'm going to get you yet.
Well, you better start looking.
Well, what about me?
You'll see.
A lot of fun you are.
You're supposed to tease me,
give me hints, make me guess, you know.
Does it bother you?
- What?
- Walking around in circles.
Oh, look. That's terrible.
He's not hurting anyone.
Neither are we.
Oh, God.
Every time I see one of those old guys...
Every time I see one of those old guys,
I always think the same thing.
What do you think?
I always think that he was once
somebody's baby boy.
No, really, I do.
I think he was once somebody's baby boy,
and he had a mother
and a father who loved him.
And now there he is,
half-dead on a park bench,
and where are his mother or his father,
all his uncles now?
Anyway, that's what I always think.
I always think how, when
they had the newspaper strike in New York,
more of those old guys died.
Fifty of them froze to death in one night.
Good afternoon. May I help you?
Yes. Extension 746, please.
One moment, please.
Director's office.
Yes, this is Mr. Caul.
I have the material
and I'm calling for an appointment.
I'm sorry. The director has
already left for the day.
We'll call you back tomorrow morning.
May I have your telephone number, please?
No, I'm at a pay phone,
and I don't have a home telephone.
Hold on one moment, please.
- Mr. Caul?
- Yes?
2:30 tomorrow afternoon.
2:30 in the afternoon?
Is that payment in full?
Whatever was arranged.
Thank you very much. I'll be there.
- Harry?
- Hello, Amy.
I didn't think you were coming.
I brought some wine
someone gave me as a birthday present.
I didn't know it was your birthday.
- Do you want some?
- Yeah.
I do.
How old are you, Harry?
Forty-two.
Sweet.
Does something special happen between us
on your birthday?
Like what?
Something personal.
Like what?
Like telling me about yourself,
your secrets.
I don't have any secrets.
I'm your secret.
You do have secrets, Harry. I know you do.
No.
Sometimes you come over here,
and you don't tell me.
Once I saw you up by the staircase, hiding,
watching,
for a whole hour.
You think you're going
to catch me at something.
You know? I know. A woman can always tell.
You have a certain way
of opening up the door.
You know, first the key goes in real quiet,
and then the door comes open real fast,
just like you think
you're gonna catch me at something.
Sometimes I even think
you're listening to me
when I'm talking on the telephone.
What are you talking about?
I don't know. I just feel it.
Really, I do.
Why are you singing that?
It's pretty.
What's the matter?
Nothing.
It's just that
somebody else was singing that today.
- A girl?
- Yes.
- Who is she?
- No, no. It isn't...
- I'm jealous.
- No.
Just somebody at work, and she...
She reminded me of you.
Where do you work, Harry?
Oh, different places, different
jobs, you know?
I'm kind of a musician, you see.
Freelance musician and...
Where do you live?
I mean, why can't I call you over there?
'Cause I don't have a telephone.
Do you live alone?
Why are you asking me all these questions?
Because it's your birthday.
I don't want people asking me
a lot of questions.
I want to know you.
Yes, I live alone.
I don't feel like answering
any more questions.
Your rent is due.
Here's the money for it.
You never used to ask a lot of questions.
Harry, I was so happy
when you came over tonight.
When I heard you open up the door,
my toes were dancing under the covers.
But I don't think
I'm going to wait for you anymore.
- I have a package for the director.
- All right. I'll take it.
No. I'm supposed to
hand it to him personally.
I have an appointment.
- Are you Mr. Caul?
- Yes, I am.
A Mr. Caul is here. All right.
Make yourself comfortable.
The director's assistant will be right down.
There are some nice Christmas cookies
there I made. You want one?
- They're good.
- No, thanks. I...
- What do you see?
- Oh, not much.
Here's your money,
$15,000 cash, as you asked.
And these are our tapes?
I had an arrangement with the director.
I was to give those to him,
you see, personally.
I understand.
But he's not here this afternoon.
As a matter of fact,
he's out of the country.
And he asked me to get the tapes from you
and give you the money.
I guess I can just wait on this.
Now, look,
don't get involved in this, Mr. Caul.
Those tapes are dangerous.
You heard them. You know what I mean.
Someone may get hurt.
Mr. Caul, be careful.
Well, what about me?
You'll see.
A lot of fun you are.
Who started this conversation anyhow?
You did.
I did not.
Yes, you did. You just don't remember it.
Pretend like I just told you a joke.
Does it bother you?
- What?
- Walking around in circles.
Oh, look. That's terrible.
He's not hurting anyone.
Neither are we.
Oh, God.
Every time I see one of those old guys,
I always think the same thing.
What do you think?
Yeah, what do you think?
I always think that he was once some...
Hey, Harry,
what do you say we take a break?
Come on. We'll go to Al's Transbay.
I'll buy you a beer, huh?
- How about that?
- No. I want to finish this.
I thought you turned those tapes in.
Stan, be quiet, will you?
All right, all right.
Do you think we can do this?
I'm tired of drinking anyhow.
What a stupid conversation.
Stan, please. I'm trying to work.
I'm tired of mostly everything.
Tired of me?
Tired of you, but not today.
What the hell they talking about,
for Christ's sake?
Stanley, please,
I'm trying to get this done.
All right. Don't get excited.
Well, I'm getting fed up.
About what?
About your asking me questions
all day long.
Jesus.
Don't say that.
Well, for Christ's sake...
Stan, don't say that again, please.
Don't use that word in vain. It bothers me.
What's the matter, Harry?
Your work's getting sloppy.
Later in the week. Sunday, maybe.
Sunday, definitely.
We'd have a much better track
if you'd paid more attention to the recording
and less attention to
what they were talking about.
I can't see why a couple of questions
about what the hell is going on
can get you so out ofjoint.
'Cause I can't sit here and explain
the personal problems of my clients.
Jack Tar Hotel.
3:00.
Room 773.
It wouldn't hurt
if you filled me in a little bit
once in a while. Did you ever think of that?
It has nothing to do with me,
and even less to do with you.
It's curiosity. Did you ever hear of that?
It's just goddamn human nature.
Listen, if there's one sure-fire rule
that I have learned in this business is that
I don't know anything about human nature.
I don't know anything about curiosity.
That's not part of what I do. What I...
This is my business, and when I'm...
I'll see you later.
I think he's been recording my telephone.
I love you.
We're spending too much time
together here.
No. Let's stay just a little longer.
I think he's been recording my telephone.
He'd kill us if he got the chance.
Bless me, Father, for I have sinned.
It's been three months
since my last confession.
I...
These are my sins.
I've taken the Lord's name in vain
on several occasions.
I...
On a number of occasions,
I've taken newspapers from the racks
without paying for them.
I...
...have deliberately taken pleasure
in impure thoughts,
and
I've been involved in some work
that I think will be used
to hurt these two young people.
It's happened to me before.
People were hurt because of my work.
I'm afraid it could happen again,
and I was in no way responsible.
I'm not responsible.
For these and all my sins of my past life,
I am heartily sorry.
Hi. Can I help you?
- Well, you could explain your system to me.
- Okay, Mr. Caul, I'm Jim Storey.
- How do you do?
- Come in and take a look here
at the system.
This is for the surveillance
of telephone communication systems.
I see.
...now available.
Here's the new LT 500.
If you're in surveillance,
you belong into the LT 500.
You can hear your sounds here
and know exactly
which door has been violated.
I see.
And you got your local alarms on the doors,
which I'm sure you've heard.
It's quite noisy.
It has a Super 8mm camera in here,
and the dot right here, the 10:00 dot,
will show exactly
what the camera sees on the back.
It's a magazine-loaded camera,
Super 8mm...
William P. Moran of Detroit, Michigan,
house courtesy telephone, please.
That's your automatic recorder actuator.
It undetectably starts the recorder
when the phone is lifted
and shuts it off
when the receiver is put back.
- What?
- It's real nice, you know.
It's not your old-fashioned voice actuator,
you know, always starting the recorder
when nobody was talking
or shutting it off in the middle
of an important conversation.
Is it anything like the Moran actuator?
The Moran E-27 is a copy.
I won't let him even smell
my equipment anymore.
- You in surveillance?
- Yeah.
Law enforcement or private operator?
Private.
You mind if I take your name
and address for our mailing list?
Harry... Harry Caul?
I didn't recognize you.
Say, I wonder,
would you take a Model 510-A?
Free of charge. Just to test it.
You know, say, in return for
that we can print in our flier
that you use it.
I build all my own equipment. Thank you.
Maybe we could take a picture
of you holding it?
Or take a picture of you
in front of our booth?
It would be a great honor for Spectre.
This is not helping crime.
It's helping justice.
...that may be affixed to
the subject's automobile...
Slide.
...and will transmit
a pulsating tone signal...
Slide.
...which is highly detectable...
Harry, good to see you.
- Beautiful suit.
- You like it? It's French.
Oh.
Let's go get a drink and talk.
Requiring no knowledge
or skill in electronics.
Come on, it's a bore.
The TA-30 may be installed and concealed
under the dash in a matter of seconds.
Hey, come on, there's somebody
over here I want you to meet,
a competitor of yours.
- Hey, Bernie, old buddy.
- Yeah, Paulie, what's up?
This is Harry Caul. William P. Moran.
Harry Caul, my pleasure.
My friends call me Bernie.
I heard a lot about you, Harry.
- Thank you.
- Bernie just moved in from Detroit.
He's the fellow that let Chrysler know
that Cadillac was discontinuing its fins.
That's right. I heard.
Harry Caul, you're a tough man
to get a hold of.
I've been wanting to talk to you
for a long time.
Hey, can you take five? We'll get a drink.
Yeah. Maybe in a couple of...
Honey... Honey, sweetheart,
show time, all right?
I'd appreciate it if you stuck around
for the demonstration, Harry.
Ladies and gentlemen.
Ladies and gentlemen, what we have here
is the Moran S-15 harmonica tap.
This electronic marvel can be installed
in a matter of two minutes.
Notice here it has its own
nickel cadmium power source,
so it cannot be detected on the line.
Once installed, it can be phoned
from any telephone in the world,
Singapore, Karchi, even Moscow.
I say Moscow 'cause you look
a little Russian there, sir, with the beard.
You just dial the target's phone number,
pause before the last digit,
blow the harmonica tone into the phone,
press the last digit.
The phone will not ring
in the target's house.
Instead, the receiver will be turned
into an actual room microphone,
thus enabling surveillance to take place.
And now, by way of
an actual demonstration,
we've installed one of these units
in my very own home.
I will now dial that number.
Thank you.
I pause before the last digit.
Harmonica.
I dial the last digit.
You will note the phone does not ring.
Can we get away?
I don't know. Maybe I can.
Where's your husband?
He's out at a convention.
When will he be back?
Not until late.
April fool! Just a little joke, folks.
- That shows you the possibilities...
- Larry Peterson...
...of the Moran S-15.
- Larry Peterson Burns.
Thank you.
The demonstration is concluded.
I'd like you to take a little literature with you
on your way.
Well, what did you think of that?
How did you like it?
It's a good item.
It's good for the catalogue suckers, huh?
Here you go, Harry. Have a free pen.
You, too, Paulie.
- I'd rather have a free drink.
- Hey, me, too.
Stanley! Stanley, do me a favor, huh?
Come on. Mind the booth, all right?
Come on. That's what I pay you for.
Just a couple of minutes.
I just wanna get a drink, all right?
Hi, Harry.
Hi, Stan.
That's right.
You two used to work together, huh?
You see that son of a bitch sitting there?
He stole my latest idea...
A lot of nice ladies around here tonight.
Say, how about that pastry in the yellow?
She come across?
Come on. Forget it. She's a part-time nun.
We'll get supper...
Hey, Harry, where you going?
You guys go on without me.
I'm going to talk to Stan.
We'll meet you later
at the chrome-dome exhibit.
Don't be long, huh, Harry. Come on.
Since when are
you working for Moran, Stanley?
Since yesterday.
Listen, that wasn't serious.
That was just a stupid argument.
That wasn't it, Harry. It's just that
I figured it was time I move up, that's all.
No... Stan,
I don't want you telling him
about any of my things.
It's not ethical.
There's not all that much
you ever let me in on, Harry.
Maybe that's the problem.
Okay. All right. I'll bring you along faster.
I'll show you some of the stuff.
You won't show me anything.
You'll keep it all to yourself.
You know damn well you will.
No, really, Stan, wait a while.
Will you think about it?
Don't do this to me now.
Some guy's following me.
Who?
I don't know.
It has something to do
with the assignment last week.
I don't know what it's about,
but I don't like it.
Okay, all right.
Okay. Thanks, Stan.
This is junk.
I'm sorry, but you have reached
a disconnected number.
Will you please make sure you...
Information.
The number for Amy Fredericks, please.
It's a new listing.
One moment, please.
Sir, I see no listing for an Amy Fredericks.
Thank you.
What are you doing here?
Take it easy. I'm just a messenger.
I brought you a drink.
I don't want your drink.
Why are you following me?
I'm not following you. I'm looking for you.
There's a big difference.
How did you know I was here?
It's a convention of wire-tappers, isn't it?
Oh, excuse me,
surveillance and security technicians.
It was a snap.
Look, I'm telling you, I'm not giving
those tapes to anybody but the director.
Yeah, I know what you told me, Mr. Caul.
All right, what's the message?
We want you to deliver the tapes
on Sunday, 1:00.
The director will be there.
He'll accept the tapes from you, in person.
You tell him I'll think about it.
- Hey, Paulie!
- Come on! Come on, let's go!
Lurleen and Millard, get in the back there.
And, Stanley, get in front!
Hey, come on, Harry.
Hey, what the hell are you doing?
Come on. I'm trying to dress up for the bar.
Hey, Bernie, it's a come-as-you-are party.
Hey, no, no! Wait a minute!
All the girls up front!
I think you take a right
somewhere around here.
Sons of bitches! Those smartasses!
Who the hell do they think
they're tangling with?
All right! Easy, easy!
Come on. We're going to have a party.
He could drive, man.
Millard, make them stop.
Relax, honey.
Paul's the best tail man in the country.
Hey, Meredith, do you hear that?
Headquarters 111,
I'm driving east on Lombard.
I'd like a rolling 10-28 on California 5-6-0,
Boy Adam Lincoln.
What are you calling for a 10-28 for?
Thanks.
Hey, Willie Sanchez, 565414th Street,
162 pounds, 5'10" and a half shithead!
You cheated!
Oh, man...
Want me to pick that lock for you, Harry?
- This'll be the bar.
- It's freezing in here.
Oh, boy, Harry. Okay.
- All right, the bar is now open.
- Thank you, thank you.
- Stanley.
- Yes, sir.
- How about a little music?
- The man wants a little music.
Harry, you got a nice shop here.
You know, I was rereading
DearAbby the other night, and there was
this article, a letter from a fella
called "Lonely and Anonymous."
I think it was Harry. Hey.
Where's the club soda?
We got any club soda?
Let me tell you something about Harry Caul.
There you go.
I know you heard this a thousand times,
Harry, but let me say it again.
Here's to Harry, the best, bar none.
I'll drink to that.
The best what?
The best bugger on the West Coast.
And who's the best bugger
on the East Coast?
Me. I'll drink to that, too.
I'll bet you will.
It's really funny we never bumped into
each other in New York, Harry.
Why is that funny?
I don't know, we work in the same business,
the same city.
I figure we'd bump into each other.
I didn't know
you came from New York, Harry.
- Yeah.
- Are you kidding?
Harry's famous in New York.
You know, the only one
I couldn't figure out though, Harry?
One what?
The welfare fund back in '68.
- How did you know about that?
- Everybody in the biz knew about it.
But nobody knows
how you did it though, Harry.
- How did you do it, Harry?
- Harry.
Ten cents a dance. Come on.
You all right?
- You hurt yourself?
- No. Don't worry about my head.
It happens all the time.
In fact, when I was a little baby,
I used to love to bang my head
up against the wall.
No, really. I did.
Sometimes I still feel like doing it
'cause it's comforting.
I tapped my first telephone
when I was 12 years old, Harry.
I mean, that's a fact. 12 years old.
It was a hallway payphone right
in the tenement, right where I lived.
Everybody in the building. For six months,
they didn't know who it was.
My father, he was proud as hell.
He was beaming.
Yeah, boy.
"That Bernie's got a real brain," he said.
From then on, it's been all uphill, Harry.
I got contacts now you wouldn't believe.
Here. Well, bring them over.
Take a cab over.
Nothing's sacred with you, is it, Harry?
Sure. The more, the merrier.
We'll be here all night.
Feel like I'm back in grammar.
- Oh, you son of a...
- What?
All right, what's the matter, Harry?
Can't you take a vacation?
You guys are amateurs, you know that?
When are you gonna get
a new scrambler, Harry?
This one went out with the Trojan War.
Harry, come on.
I want to hear all about you.
- Where you from?
- Really obsolete, you know that, Harry?
- Harry got himself a girlfriend.
- Watch out, Harry.
- Where are you from?
- New York.
I used to live in New York.
Yes. First, I worked as a receptionist,
and then I got promoted to secretary.
And then I was promoted to gal Friday,
and special assistant to the boss,
and then I married him.
Do you live far from here?
Harry?
Are you still married?
Oh, I don't know. Probably.
I guess maybe I am.
Last time I heard, he was...
Well, he was trying
to scrape up enough money
- to buy another hardware store.
- Yeah.
And I ended up
out here in San Francisco, unemployed,
which is the entire story of my life
up until tonight.
Here's to you.
You don't like me very much, do you?
You don't want to talk to me or anything.
I didn't say that.
Something is on your mind.
I wish you'd tell me.
I really do. I wish that...
I wish that you'd feel
that you could talk to me
and that we could be friends.
I mean, aside from all of this junk.
Would you...
If you were a girl
who'd waited for someone...
You can trust me.
Well, you never really knew
when he was going to come to see you.
You just lived in a room alone,
and you knew nothing about him.
And if you loved him,
you were patient with him,
and even though he didn't dare ever
tell you anything about himself personally,
even though he may have loved you,
would you...
- Would I what?
- Would you...
Would you go back to him?
Well, how would I know?
How would I know that he loved me?
You'd have no way of knowing.
Hey, Harry!
Did you hear the one about
the broad who busted Vegas?
She wore a see-through blouse.
You know something, Harry?
Twelve years ago,
I recorded every telephone call
made by the presidential nominee
of a major political party.
I don't want to say which party.
But everywhere he went, that's where I was.
Coast to coast, I was listening, Harry.
I'm not saying I elected
the President of the United States, but
you can draw your own conclusions, Harry.
- I mean, he lost.
- Harry,
tell them about the time
you put the bug in the parakeet.
- Parakeet?
- No kidding.
Harry one time actually put a microphone
in a little parakeet.
Is that right?
Parakeets don't happen to be
my thing, Harry,
but I sure would like to know
how you did the teamster local back in '68.
What was that?
- Don't you get papers in Chicago, Millard?
- Probably out on strike.
It was all over the front pages.
Harry was working
for the attorney general's office at the time.
You didn't know I knew that, did you, Harry?
Anyway, the president of this teamster local
back east
set up a phony welfare fund, right?
I mean, you correct me on the details, Harry.
I may be a little fuzzy on them.
There was only two people
that seemed to know about it,
the president and his accountant.
They only talked about it
on fishing trips that they went on.
On a private boat.
That was the only place they talked details.
And that boat was bug-proof.
I happen to know that for a fact, Harry.
They wouldn't even strike up a conversation
if there was another boat
even on the horizon.
That didn't stop Harry though, did it?
No, he recorded everything.
Nobody knows how you did it though,
Harry. Caused a hell of a scandal, too.
Why?
Why? No reason.
Three people were murdered, that's all.
Harry's a bit too modest
to tell us how he did it though.
It had nothing to do with me.
I just turned in the tapes.
The president thought
the accountant had talked.
- Well, nobody really knows for sure.
- That's right.
Three days later,
they found the accountant, his wife and kid,
they were all naked
and tied up in the house.
Hands and feet tied up with rope,
all the hair on their bodies shaved off.
Their heads were found in different places.
- They killed them?
- No. They gift-wrapped them.
No, no, no. This is ancient history now.
Harry, how did you do it?
What they do with the tapes
is their own business.
That's the first time
I heard about you, Harry.
Next thing I knew,
you moved out of New York.
It had nothing to do with me.
Come on, Harry, show and tell.
How did you do it?
For God's sake, Harry, tell him!
- Turn it off, Stan.
- What for?
Stan, turn it off!
They ought to hear this, Harry.
It's the best thing you've ever done!
What was that, Stan?
Well, it's the assignment
that Harry did this week.
- It'll make history.
- Yeah?
I bet you there's no moment between
human beings that I cannot record,
and there's no method
that I cannot figure out.
I could figure out
any of Harry's schemes, right?
Come on, come on. Try me.
- Let me give him the assignment, Harry.
- Yeah.
Now, this is a quad in the center of the city.
All right?
Now, these are steps coming in here
and benches all around.
It's 12:00 noon,
which means that it's lunchtime for
all the people that work in
these offices around here.
People are walking, talking, having lunch,
and it's crowded.
- Naturally. Come on, Stan.
- Okay.
Now, two people
are constantly moving in circles,
in and out of the crowd.
We don't know
whether they'll sit down or what.
They're convinced that
they can't be recorded
because they're in a crowd
and constantly moving. Yet,
they're the target.
Now, the assignment is
to get everything they say.
How would you do it?
First of all, one system won't do it.
- Hell, I could've told you that.
- Yeah, why didn't you?
Go on, figure it out.
Second of all, it's easy.
All you do is get to their clothes first.
You pre-rig their clothes.
No. There's no way of telling
what they're going to be wearing.
Then you get somebody to bump into them.
You just get a drunk or something, bump
into them, you plant a pin mike on them.
They've been bugged before. It's too risky.
I got it.
You hire a lip-reader with binoculars.
- No. The client wants their actual voice.
- Why?
So he can believe it.
All right. I'll figure it out.
I don't know.
It must've been an expensive show.
- Who was so interested?
- Yeah, was it us?
- Who's us?
- Federal government.
Private party.
It would take at least four passes.
- I did it in three.
- Three?
That's very nice, Harry. What did you use?
Three-stage directional microphones
with MOSFET amplifier of my own design.
And we got another 20% conventionally,
just tailing them. Paul did.
Beautiful.
It really was. It was a work of art.
You should have seen it, though.
These new microphones are just incredible.
I couldn't really believe it myself.
We were over 200 yards away.
It was absolutely readable. Everything.
I broke in a couple of
newsreel cameramen, and...
You should have been there, Bernie.
It was really...
What did they do?
Well, they took
the crosshairs of the telescope
and they lined it up on the mouths...
No. The boy and the girl. What did they do?
Oh, I don't know. But it was really beautiful,
really something to see.
Yeah. Sounds very pretty.
I'd like to take a look at that mike, too.
There it is.
I always said we should be partners, Harry.
I mean, I always said
you're the best, right?
But you and me together, that'd be tops.
All I need is a quick look
at some of your plans and devices.
You know, just get an idea...
I got all the manufacturing plants.
We could make a fortune
selling stuff to Uncle Sam, Harry.
Listen, did you hear
about the fag wire-tapper
- who could only tap a Princess phone?
- No.
Made that up yourself, huh?
It's pretty funny.
Excuse me, can I cut in?
He's got a hell of a sense of humor.
I'm talking about making millions,
he's making with the jokes.
- Come on!
- Thanks a lot.
What do you say, Harry? Come on.
How about going into a partnership, Harry?
I could use a partner, so could you.
- 50-50, how about it?
- I don't need anyone.
No, no.
That's all right.
I do pretty good on my own, anyway.
You got to give credit
where credit's due, right?
Abracadabra, Harry.
See, I'm number two, Harry.
I have to try harder.
If you were a girl
who'd waited for someone...
You can trust me.
Harry, that's you and me
when we were out there.
What? No shit.
...when he was going to come to see you.
It's the Moran Super P-7 pen mike
and transmitter.
That's terrific! The bugger got bugged, huh?
He got you, Harry.
And if you loved him,
you were patient with him,
and even though he didn't dare ever
tell you anything about himself personally,
even though he may have loved you,
would you...
That was wild. When did you do that?
Hey, how do you like it, Harry?
What do you think about it, huh?
Would you... Would you go back to him?
I think you'd better
turn it off and get out.
You'd have no way of knowing.
Are you kidding?
It's just a joke, for Christ's sake.
Bernie, Harry don't like you
to say "Christ's sake."
Oh, no? Well, I'm sorry, Harry. I apologize.
What, are you crazy, too, Stanley?
Hey, Harry. What's wrong?
Come on. Let's have a party here.
What do you say?
Paul, it's getting late.
Come on, take it easy.
Come on.
- Hey, Millard.
- Know what these things cost, Harry?
This cost 1,500 beans. Come on.
On the house, from me to you.
Very nice to meet you.
It was only a joke.
- Meredith?
- Guy's got no sense of humor.
- No. I'm going to stay here.
- Paul!
Okay.
I forgot my bag.
Harry, I'm really sorry.
I didn't mean anything.
- Come on, Stan.
- See you Monday, Harry.
You want us to put the lights out?
- Good night, Harry!
- Yeah. Good night, Harry.
What do you think?
I don't know what I'm going
to get him for Christmas yet.
He's already got everything.
Harry, are you going to
give me a hard time tonight? Harry!
Harry! Come on. Come back. Turn it off.
She's frightened.
This is where she's frightened.
I don't know what I'm going
to get him for Christmas yet.
This is no ordinary conversation.
- He doesn't need anything anymore.
- It makes me feel...
Well, I haven't decided
what I'm going to get you yet.
...something.
- Forget it, Harry. It's only a trick.
- What?
- A job.
You're not supposed to
feel anything about it.
You're just supposed to do it. That's all.
Relax, honey.
A lot of fun you are.
- Relax.
- You're supposed to tease me,
give me hints, make me guess, you know.
Does it bother you?
- What?
- Walking around in circles.
Oh, look. That's terrible.
He's not hurting anyone.
Come on.
Neither are we.
- Oh, God.
- "Oh, God."
Listen to the way she says, "Oh, God."
Come here.
Every time I see one of those old guys,
I always think the same thing.
What do you think?
I always think that he was once
somebody's baby boy.
Really, I do.
I think he was once somebody's baby boy,
and he had a mother
and a father who loved him.
And now there he is,
half-dead on a park bench,
and where are his mother or his father,
all his uncles now?
Anyway, that's what I always think.
I always think how, when
they had the newspaper strike in New York,
more of those old guys died.
Fifty of them froze to death in one night.
Just because there were no newspapers?
- Really. Keeps them warm.
- That's terrible.
Who started this conversation, anyhow?
- You did.
- Did not.
Yes, you did. You just don't remember it.
Pretend like I just told you a joke.
- Where did you hear that?
- That's my secret.
Later in the week. Sunday, maybe.
Sunday, definitely.
Jack Tar Hotel.
3:00.
Room 773.
Look, Mark. Do you see him?
The man with the hearing aid like Charles?
- No. Where?
- Right there, with the shopping bag.
He's been following us all around,
and he's following us close.
It's nothing. Don't worry about it.
Angel...
God, it will be so good
to be finished with all this.
I love you.
It's all right, baby. It's all right.
We're spending too much time
together here.
No. Let's stay just a little longer.
"Kill us."
He'd kill them if he had a chance.
He'd kill us if he got the chance.
Oh, God, what I have done.
I have to destroy the tapes.
I can't let it happen again.
It's true.
- I'd better get back. It's almost 2:00.
- Oh, no, please, don't go.
A family was murdered because of me.
I know. I know, Harry.
Everything will turn out.
Oh, God. There's no protection.
I follow them wherever they're going.
And I can hear them.
Bye-bye.
Oh, wait, you have something in your eye.
- Yeah?
- You really don't. I just wanted to kiss you.
I forgive you. I forgive you, darling.
Listen. Listen. My name is Harry Caul.
Can you hear me?
Don't be afraid.
I... I know you don't know who I am,
but I know you.
There isn't much to say about myself. I...
Sick when I was a boy.
I was very sick when I was a boy.
I was paralyzed in my left arm
and my left leg.
I couldn't walk for six months.
One doctor said that
I'd probably never walk again.
My mother...
My mother used to lower me into a hot bath.
It was therapy.
One time the doorbell rang
and she went down to answer it.
I started sliding down.
I could feel the water.
It started coming up to my chin, to my nose.
And when I woke up,
my body was all greasy
from the holy oil she put on my body.
I remember being disappointed I survived.
When I was five,
my father introduced me to a friend of his,
and for no reason at all, I hit him
right in the stomach with all my strength.
He died a year later.
He'll kill you if he gets a chance.
I'm not afraid of death.
I am afraid of murder.
Meredith?
Hey!
Bitch.
Good morning. May I help you?
- Yes. Extension 765, please.
- One moment, please.
Director's office.
Yes, I'd like to speak
to the director's assistant, please.
Mr. Stett. Mr. Martin Stett.
Mr. Caul is on the line.
One moment, please.
I'm sorry. That's impossible now.
Can we get back to you?
No, I... I have to talk to him.
- Can we have your name again?
- Caul.
- Would you mind spelling that?
- C-A-U-L. Caul.
I'm putting you on hold.
- Mr. Caul, we'll get right back to you.
- No. You don't have my telephone number!
Hello?
- Yes?
- Mr. Caul? This is Martin Stett.
How did you get this phone number?
We prepare a full dossier on everyone
who comes in contact with the director.
You know that means
we've been watching you.
We have the tapes. They're perfectly safe.
The director was very anxious
to hear them as soon as possible.
You seemed to be...
I don't know... Disturbed.
I couldn't take the chance
that you might destroy our tapes.
You understand, don't you, Mr. Caul?
Our tapes have nothing to do with you.
Why don't you come over now
and bring the photographs?
- Yes...
- The director's here,
and he's prepared to pay you in full.
Every time I see one of those old guys,
I always think the same thing.
What do you think?
I always think that he was once
somebody's baby boy.
Really, I do.
I think he was once somebody's baby boy,
and he had a mother
and a father who loved him.
And now there he is,
half-dead on a park bench,
and where are his mother or his father,
all his uncles now?
Anyway, that's what I always think.
I always think how, when
they had the newspaper strike in New York,
more of those old guys died.
Fifty of them froze to death in one night.
Just because there were no newspapers?
- Really. Keeps them warm.
- That's terrible.
Who started this conversation anyhow?
- You did.
- Did not.
Yes, you did. You just don't remember it.
Oh, Mark, it's all right. We can talk.
I can't stand it. I can't stand it anymore.
- You're going to make me cry.
- I know, honey, I know. Me, too.
- No, don't.
- Oh, God.
- You want to hear that again?
- You want it to be true!
No, I don't. I just want you to know
whatever you need to know.
That's all.
Your money's on the table.
Do you think we can do this?
I'm tired of drinking anyhow.
I'm tired of mostly everything.
- Tired of me?
- Tired of you,
but not today.
Later in the week. Sunday, maybe.
Sunday, definitely.
Jack Tar Hotel.
3:00.
Room 773.
Look, Mark. Do you see him?
The man with the hearing aid like Charles?
- No. Where?
- Right there, with the shopping bag.
Please count your money outside.
He's been following us all around,
and he's following us close.
It's nothing. Don't worry about it.
God, it will be so good
to be finished with all this.
I love you.
These are the pictures you asked for.
We're spending too much time
together here.
No. Let's stay just a little longer.
What will you do to her?
...kill us if he got the chance.
I think he's been recording my telephone.
Listen, I'd better get back.
It's almost 2:00.
No, please, don't go back there.
Not just yet.
All right. All right, honey. I won't.
Fifteen thousand bucks.
That's not bad for a day's work,
is it, Mr. Caul?
What'll he do with them?
We'll see.
He'd kill us if he got the chance.
Later in the week. Sunday, maybe.
Sunday, definitely.
Jack Tar Hotel.
3:00.
Room 773.
I wonder if you could give me Room 773.
773?
That is occupied, sir.
The rooms are
all basically the same, however.
Well...
Do you have a room that would be
adjoining, close by?
- Adjoining, just... Yes, I do.
- You do.
I'm tired of this lying, all right?
I'm tired of lying!
Oh, Mark, it's all right. We can talk.
I can't stand it. I can't stand it anymore.
- You're going to make me cry.
- I know, honey, I know. Me, too.
No, don't.
I have no idea what you're talking about.
No idea! This has all been a lie!
Don't you understand that?
I love you.
The answer is, "No."
At the end of the briefing last night,
it was stated
that Nixon would not deliver
the State of the Union message in person...
Why not?
- Watch out for the bumps!
- Will you cut that out?
How can you yell at me like that?
And in my condition.
You're not fit to be the father of my child.
Oh, what is this?
- I'm just trying to act like Wilma.
- Well, you're overdoing it.
All right. Pull over.
What's the big rush?
I'm taking my wife to the hospital.
She's having a baby.
I got to hand it to you, buddy.
You sure got intestinal fortitude.
You better sit down, Fred.
You're wearing a groove in the floor.
Look at Wilma out there.
How can she be so calm
when she knows what I'm going through?
- How are you, Fred?
- How do you think I am?
This waiting, waiting, waiting...
It's tough!
Betty, you go back out there
and tell Wilma if she doesn't...
- Wait. Richard!
- I want to see the director.
He's not in today.
I'm afraid you'll have to leave now.
Let's clear an aisle
and let these people through,
- and we can move on upstairs.
- Come on, clear the way here.
We'll answer your questions upstairs.
Just let these people through.
Let these people through.
- Just one question.
- No, please.
Do you suspect any foul play
in the accident?
Please!
What about your corporate control?
Will your stock now give you
a controlling interest...
What kind of insurance do you have?
What's going to happen to the company?
That's an unfair question.
- Did you have...
- Did your husband...
What do you think?
I don't know what I'm going
to get him for Christmas yet.
He's already got everything.
He doesn't need anything anymore.
Do you feel now
that there's an enemy within the company?
He's not hurting anyone.
Neither are we.
Oh, God.
Did your husband have
a history of drunk driving?
No comments, no more...
Did your husband have
a history of drunk, reckless driving?
I can't stand it. I can't stand it anymore.
Take it!
Do you think we can do this?
Later in the week. Sunday, maybe.
Sunday, definitely.
Jack Tar Hotel.
3:00.
Room 773.
He'd kill us if he got the chance.
Hello.
Hello?
Hello.
- Hello?
- We know that you know, Mr. Caul.
For your own sake,
don't get involved any further.
We'll be listening to you.