DCI Banks Aftermath Episode Scripts

N/A - Piece of my Heart (1)

1 That was good.
No! It was good, but I didn't quite get all of the plot, and it was too long.
And really noisy, but it was quite good.
There you go, Grandad.
OK, so the baby sitter's fine.
I've got - wow! - two whole hours.
Drink? Bite to eat? Come on.
Not much choice with the white wine, I'm afraid.
Who cares? Cheers.
Oh, shit! Must be a power cut.
Right, we need to talk about the tape.
I know all about it.
I know what's on it, and I'm going to get hold of it.
I'm going to get to the truth because I was brought up to believe in truth and decency and justice and all that stuff.
It's just the way I am.
Love makes madmen of us all.
Isn't that what they say? Thanks, Alan.
It was nice.
Nice? Look, maybe next time we do go for a meal? Yeah, I'd like that.
Night, Annie.
Annie? Can you get the babysitter to stay longer? Yeah.
There's a major incident.
I'll drive.
Holiday chalet.
The victim was renting it.
His body was found by the caretaker.
He came to check the victim was OK after the power went down.
His name's Martin Soames.
He found the body but - He traipsed all over the place in the dark.
Yeah.
It's a very compromised crime scene.
Tariq, do you have an ID for us yet? Victim was using a hired car.
His name's Matthew Barber, 33.
Lives in London, journalist.
Boss, crime scene's ready.
Well, we don't need Pathology for time of death.
The power went down at 9:15.
We were in the pub.
What time did the caretaker find him? 9:45.
How do you know it was after the power went? Candle on the floor.
Must've fallen in the struggle.
We'll do our best with trace evidence, but it's messy.
Boss, down here.
There's a computer plug and battery pack, but no laptop.
No sign of his phone or wallet either.
Robbery gone wrong? There's no sign of forced entry.
Looks like we've found the murder weapon.
OK.
Check it for prints, but let's not hold our breath.
We've got a bit of a bipolar killer.
Serious violence, but he still had the presence of mind to clean the murder weapon and ransack the victim's personal effects.
Just stop there, please, sir.
Boss.
The victim's father's outside.
Jack Barber.
What? The guy who's running for police commissioner? You know him? We passed in the night, career-wise.
But everyone admired Jack Barber from a distance.
Can I help you, sir? Well, yes, I hope so.
My son is staying in that chalet.
My name's DCI Alan Banks.
This is my colleague, DS Cabbot.
There's been a major incident.
Major incident? Is my son? I can't seem to get hold of him.
His phone's gone dead.
That's all I can say for now.
I'm sure you'll understand, Mr Barber.
Why don't you go home? We'll call you as soon as possible.
Yes, yes, of course, I understand.
You couldn't have done anything else.
We can't give him special treatment.
Poor man.
Oi! Hey! What's that? Stop the car! Stop! Police! Come on.
What's he playing at? Number plate? Too much spray, I can't see.
I still can't see.
Left hand tail light's broken.
Annie, careful.
Annie! Shit! Annie! Who you playing at? You could have killed yourself.
We've lost a suspect.
You've got a young child.
I'm a cop.
Not your girlfriend.
Alan? Alan? Morning.
Sorry about last night.
I got carried away.
My fault.
You were being a police officer, and I'm sorry.
I wasn't thinking straight.
Come on, then.
Do your bloke thing.
Compartmentalise.
Morning, team.
Oh, morning, boss! DS Cabbot.
Matthew Barber.
London-based, investigative journalist.
Over the last five years, he's run exposes of miscarriages of justice, official corruption, organized crime groups, financial impropriety.
This is a man with a lot of enemies.
We need to get through every investigation he's done.
OK, but it's probably something he was currently working on.
His computer and phone were taken.
The killer wanted to stop whatever he'd uncovered from getting out.
Maybe it was just robbery.
His wallet was taken.
That could be to misdirect us.
Why was Matt Barber renting a chalet in Yorkshire? I want every minute of every hour accounted for.
Where did he go? Who did he see? Ken, get everyone tasked up.
Usual avenues: friends, family, work colleagues.
Thanks, everyone.
I understand there was a motor vehicle incident last night? Yeah, there was a car fleeing the scene.
Annie and I pursued, but we didn't apprehend.
Number plate? Make? It blue-black Merc.
Brake light broken.
Left side.
I was on call, you know.
It was a foul night, Helen, and I thought Ken, Tariq, Annie and I could handle the crime scene.
You both logged onto the case at exactly the same time.
You HAVE been busy.
Yes, DI Morton.
DS Cabbot and I went to the pictures last night.
Boss? Ken? There's an Elizabeth Lester to see you? Who? Owner of the chalet Matt Barber was in.
Yes.
Annie, can you liaise with the Met.
We need to find out about Matt Barber's London life.
Helen? Miss Lester.
Thank you for agreeing to come in and see us.
It's awful.
Mr Barber being murdered like that.
What makes you think he was murdered? Martin - Mr Soames - the caretaker who found the body, he told me.
He's in a dreadful state.
We'll need a list of everyone who's been there within the last three months.
Have you been there yourself in that time? Uh, yes? Then we'll also need your prints and a DNA sample.
Liz Forbes? Yes.
I really enjoyed your first two albums.
They were really good.
I still listen to them.
Oh.
Thank you.
You haven't recorded anything since? I suppose I've outgrown the music business.
I'm sorry, this might seem inappropriate, but the last track on your first album, Dark Eyed Boy, just as it's fading out, there's a sound, an instrument that comes in.
Is it a zither? Er Well, yes.
But we played it backwards to get that feeling of - Yearning? Loss? Yes.
Miss Lester? My business name.
I have to be discreet.
Overzealous fans.
I can imagine.
Thanks, Terry.
Would you like to sit down and get your breath back? I'm sorry.
It's just That was Liz Forbes.
No, never heard of her.
Why am I not surprised? OK.
Look, she was never huge.
But she made two great albums in the '90s.
Really complex, adult stuff, folk, jazz-influenced.
More than the sum of the parts.
I don't understand.
You know that I'm passionate about music.
Everyone's passionate about something, Helen.
What are you passionate about? Punctuality? Mr Barber.
Alan.
This is my colleague - DI Helen Morton.
It's this way, sir.
OK, sir.
Sir? It's Matthew.
I last saw Matthew on Friday afternoon.
About four o'clock.
At the chalet.
He seemed fine.
Nothing was worrying him.
I didn't notice anything untoward.
Sirif you went to the chalet, then - Yes, I know.
I know.
You'll need finger prints and a DNA sample.
I'm sorry for your loss, sir.
Thank you.
Alan, there's no need to worry.
I'll not be pressurizing you for any special treatment.
OK? So far we've pulled 27 sets of prints.
We've identified some of them.
Matt Barber, cleaning lady, the caretaker, Martin Soames and Liz Forbes.
Oh, your new girlfriend! I've got a list of people who've stayed in the chalet for the past six months and I've actioned TIEs.
Helen, Jack Barber - we'll need a full statement.
Why was his son in Yorkshire? Also Matt Barber's personal life? Girlfriends? Boyfriends? Whatever.
As for his professional life? Annie, you and I are booked on the 8am to London.
I didn't just assign you to this so that we could be alone.
No-one's saying you did.
Except DI Morton.
I mean, I've never seen Spock so tickled.
Respect for your fellow police officer, please.
She's enjoying this, you know.
Enjoying what exactly? Making us squirm about something she thinks is going on, even though it's not actually going on, but it doesn't matter because people think it is going on.
Is it? Is it what? Going on? It's complicated.
Us? Or Matt Barber's life? Both.
Mr Barber's ready for you.
Well, there was the odd girlfriend, but nothing serious.
And no-one at present, as far as I'm aware.
Of course, most of his friends were in London.
And what about his professional life? Well, I'm afraid I can't help you there.
You see, Matthew was very discreet about his work.
In some ways we were in the same line of business.
Righting wrongs, serving justice.
It's the way I brought him up.
What about his mother? Would she -? He hasn't seen his mother in 30 years.
I brought him up by myself.
You see, when he was young I was really quite worried about him.
He was so littleand vulnerable.
Was that the last time you saw your son? Friday, 4pm, at the chalet? Yes, that's right.
We chatted a little: Leeds Rhinos, the state of the nation, my campaign.
Why was he in Yorkshire? Well, I live here.
Yes, but he didn't stay with you.
He came all the way from London for whatever reason and he stayed in a chalet.
Not with you.
No.
Are we done here? It's not so much a brick wall as - Too many leads.
Matt Barber was busy with a lot of different things.
We've got everything here: offshore tax evasion, legal action against the police, the John Gaunt case, health service outsourcing.
John Gaunt? Where? Here.
John Gaunt.
John Gaunt.
John Gaunt.
Yeah, here we go.
He was a guitarist with a band called The Crystal Kiss.
Never heard of 'em.
He was murdered in the late '80s.
And? And .
.
thatis Liz Forbes.
Dust and stone come crashing down Buried beneath This house, this street, this town Memories I'll not easily forget Of how we met Lost and lonely 'What drives me is the same thing that's driven me 'through 30 years of frontline service.
'I believe in fairness.
I believe in decency.
'I'm not interested in power for power's sake.
'I'm interested in power to protect us all from organised crime.
'At the moment we are using a 19th century structure 'to combat what is a 21st century problem.
' In your gaze I'm never as before My sweet and beautiful Dark-eyed boy Slippery sweet And I'm tasting defeat The subtlety The Crystal Kiss released one single, Marginal Love, in 1988.
Got to number two in the charts.
Then, while rehearsing in this house, this guy, the bassist Martin Harford, had a fight with John Gaunt, the guitarist.
Now, John took a tumble down the stairs and died.
Martin did five years for manslaughter.
Crystal Kiss's moment had gone.
Footnote in pop history.
Sorry, why is this relevant? Wasn't our victim working on many projects? But he was murdered in a chalet that he was renting from Liz Forbes.
And the lovely, fragrant Liz was the lead singer of The Crystal Kiss.
Right, so TIEs on the other two band members - Martin Harford, Ian Basset.
Harford should be easy.
But after the death of Gaunt Ian Basset left the country.
Only child and his parents died a few years ago.
Doesn't matter.
I still want to talk him, so all the stops, please, Ken.
Helen, I want you to go to Regional HQ.
Seize all the files on the John Gaunt killing.
Annie, let's go and see what Liz Forbes has to say.
Actually, I think DS Cabbot and I should interview Liz Forbes? Yeah, you should here and hold the fort.
With me, DS Cabbot.
So, you still live here? Well, I don't see it as morbid.
We recorded here and we always dreamed we'd all live and work here as a band.
Well, I did OK from my solo albums, so when this house came up for sale I had to buy it.
I've always loved it here.
Marginal Love.
Album art for the Japanese release.
Quite rare, so I'm told.
Did you know Matt Barber was an investigative journalist? Working on a story on John Gaunt.
No.
No, I didn't know that.
Liz, the day that John died, what happened? We were rehearsing.
The studio used to be up there.
I was with Ian.
Martin and John had an argument.
It got out of hand.
Martin hit him, John fell all the way to the bottom.
He died instantly.
It was an accident.
A dreadful accident.
What were they fighting about? I couldn't really tell you exactly.
I was always sort of semi-detached from the band.
You know, brought in to do the wispy ethereal vocals.
Those three boys, it was pretty intense between them.
Love, hate and testosterone.
It's a very volatile cocktail.
Ian Basset.
Do you know where he is? No.
After it happened, he disappeared.
You didn't keep in touch? No.
I've been reading a lot of background material, and I know your solo albums, obviously, but I always thought that you and Ian Well, Ian was my first proper boyfriend.
It was pretty special at the time, but it's 25 years ago.
Another life.
That's what being young's all about, isn't it? So since then you've not met anyone? No-one significant.
I think long term relationships are too complicated.
And Martin Harford? Where is he? Poor Martin.
He er Liz, is there something you want to tell us? Where's Martin? You've already met him.
There's a lot here, isn't there? 1988.
Ancient times.
Bits of paper were your database back then.
OK? How come Jack Barber's got clearance for the police archive? He's Jack Barber.
He can go where he wants.
Ken? She's still a really attractive woman, isn't she? Who's that, then? Miss Forbes.
Oh.
She's sexy in a cool, classy way.
Mm-hm.
I wouldn't blame you if you still fancied her.
I would, butwhen she's a suspect in a Cat A enquiry, that's kind of one of my turnoffs.
And in one leap he was free.
Mrs Soames? Yes? DS Annie Cabbot.
DCI Alan Banks.
May we come in, please? Yeah.
Yeah, of course.
Thank you.
You'll find him out the back with the kids.
Bloody hell.
Martin Soames is Martin Harford.
The caretaker.
One and the same.
Play it by yourself.
Mr Soames? Can we still call you Martin Harford? My name's Martin Soames.
Well, we'd like to talk to you.
About the death of John Gaunt.
No, I'm not talking about that.
I'm not talking without a lawyer.
I want to see a lawyer.
That's the rules.
Ken? Found in one of Matt Barber's jacket pockets.
Receipt from here.
14:56, Tuesday afternoon.
The day he was murdered.
Latte and a pot of tea? Who was he meeting? Already on it.
Great.
Yeah.
How could I forget? Him and the other guy had a right argument.
Practically came to blows.
I had to tell them to cool it.
This other man? Do you remember what he looked like? Yeah.
It was him.
'Jack Barber?' He lied to us about the last time he saw his son.
If he wasn't who he is, we wouldn't hesitate in making him a suspect.
All right, but Jack Barber is highly respected on this force.
Troops and senior management Exactly why we shouldn't give him special treatment.
Why would he kill his own son? I don't know.
Arguing in public? There's some issue between them.
And the crime scene.
No forced entry, the victim knew his killer, and an argument that got out of hand.
Ian Basset.
The guy who disappeared from the bad.
He got into Hull from Ostend three days ago.
Before Matt Barber was murdered.
Right, we need to find him.
Now.
OK, what we have here are two separate lines of inquiry.
Jack Barber and The Crystal Kiss.
Helen, go carefully around old man Barber.
He knows the drill and he still wields a lot of influence.
But we need answers.
What were he and Matt arguing about? And why did he lie to us? The Crystal Kiss.
Tariq, get a few pairs of eyes and go through that lot.
Annie, you're with me.
Martin Soames.
He's on his way here with his brief.
I've been thinking about you and me working together and dating.
Are we dating? I thought we were - Sunday night, you're coming round to mine for dinner.
You bring the wine.
I'll cook.
Right.
OK, I think.
I mean, I'll need to get a baby sitter.
Bring the baby.
Right.
I'll need to arrange some - And bring the travel cot.
"Bring the travel cot?" And they say romance is dead.
Let's see what the artist formerly known as Martin Harford has to say.
Yeah, let's.
DCI Alan Banks.
I'm heading the inquiry into the death of Matt Barber.
David Hornby.
DS Cabbott.
Mr Hornby.
I believe I owe you an apology.
The Olsen case? I was a bit hard on you.
Shall we? Mr Soames.
After you.
And the Olsen case? We got the result.
Always the last word.
Five years ago, my firm represented Martin Harford when he confessed to the accidental killing of John Gaunt.
He's paid his debt.
When he came out of prison, he changed his name by deed poll to Martin Soames.
He wanted to build a new life.
All above board.
And my client did not talk to Matt Barber about the death of his friend, John Gaunt.
I don't believe you, Martin.
Unless you can prove whatever it is you believe, Mr Banks, this conversation is a waste of time.
Matt Barber was an investigative journalist.
Nothing to investigate.
Martin - I got into a fight with John because he wanted to leave the band.
It got out of hand, I lost my temper and I lashed out.
Sounds like the death of Matt Barber.
What's going on here, Annie? Tuesday night you arrived at the chalet and found Matt Barber dead.
At about 9:45pm.
Is that correct? Yes.
Look, it's all in Mr Soames' statement.
Where were you when the power went down at 9:15pm? As I - We need a positional statement from your client.
Working on one of Liz's other chalets in Ellesby.
Working? At that time of night? We had guests arriving first thing.
I work for Liz, as and when she needs me.
She, erm Well, she helped me put my life back together when I came out of prison.
And this property you were working at, how far was it from Mr Barber's chalet? About eight miles.
And you drove there? No.
He took a hot air balloon.
A man is dead! This isn't a game, you prick! Matt Barber was a well known investigative journalist.
He made a lot of enemies.
You're barking up the wrong tree here.
Good to see you again, Annie.
Look, I, don't suppose you fancy a drink later? I've got to work.
Lookyou've had a run in with him in court.
It happens.
He's defence.
That's his job.
That's not the point.
What is the point, Annie? Nothing.
I'm fine.
It won't happen again.
Ian.
Thanks.
Martin I have to ask you - I didn't kill Matt Barber.
We've still got some issues here.
Sorry.
I've changed my mind.
After what happened.
That's all the more reason to go ahead.
No.
No.
I don't want to go through with it.
I killed John, OK? End of story.
Hi, Liz.
What? Eryeah, OK, I'm on my way.
Mr Barber.
You told us you last saw your son on Friday.
But we know that you and Matt actually met at 2:38pm on Tuesday.
That's the day your son was murdered.
According to the manager at the coffee shop you went to, you and your son had a row.
In fact in his statement, the manager says, "They practically came to blows.
I had to physically separate them.
" Now, Mr Barber - See? This is exactly what I'm up against.
Time-serving civil servants with colour-coded notebooks and their head in the manual.
When I'm commissioner there will be certain officers who will find themselves in dog training.
Do I make myself clear, DI Morton? You diminish yourself more than me with that, sir.
Matthew said he wanted to find his mother.
She walked out on us 30 years ago.
After I won the custody battle she never tried to get hold of him, contact with him, not one attempt.
She just abandoned him.
So Well, I know I should have been a bit more understanding.
But when he said he wanted to find his mother I lost it.
I got angry.
I got really angry.
And that was the last time I saw him.
Why didn't you tell us this before? Look, if I've broken the law, you arrest and charge me.
If not, stop pestering me.
Back in the 90s, I bought a place like this in Spain near Cadiz.
Same architect.
I suppose I was trying to recapture the past too.
But it wasn't the same.
This is wonderful Liz.
I feel like I've come home.
You can't be serious.
Reforming the band? I feel we have unfinished business.
Do you remember that night, May 10th, 1988? We sold out The Forum.
The four of us.
Remember, Martin? I'll never forget that.
None of us will.
I remember us all looking at one another.
The world was ours.
Do you remember what it felt like? To be that wanted? You haven't changed, Ian.
That was our perfect moment, Liz.
And John died.
Liz? Liz, tell him this is stupid.
I mean, you don't want to reform the band, do you? Come on, Martin.
There's a huge demand for a reunion.
Who told you that? A journalist I've been speaking to.
Matt Barber.
What? Your journalist is dead.
He was murdered.
Nearly 30 years later and he still has a grudge against Matt's mother.
He's bitter and, I've been asking around, when Jack Barber was on the force, he was not a man you wanted to cross.
He was famous for his temper.
He had high standards and when people didn't meet up to those standards - I know.
And you think he's a good and decent man.
But we have to go after him, Alan.
You know he really tried to intimidate me.
Sometimes good people do bad things.
Boss? Matt Barbers bank accounts and financial statements, going back two years.
This one sticks out.
Bertram Mellis? Names of the senior partners.
Thanks, Ken.
Alan.
'Where are you?' I'm just grabbing a coffee.
'We need you back here as soon as, please.
' OK.
Are you OK? 'Yeah.
' I'm on my way.
What exactly did Matt Barber tell you, Ian? He'd spoken to a promoter who'd sounded out demand, andwe could do really well.
He was trying to lure you back into the country.
Why would he do that? Martin? The tape.
I told him about the tape.
He got me drunk.
I let it slip.
I'm sorry.
It's OK, Martin.
I'll look after you.
I always have, haven't I, sweetheart? Sarge, Matt Barber's financial transactions.
One in particular from a local law firm - Bertram Mellis.
Barber received a payment of ã15,000 actioned by one of the senior members - David Hornby.
Who? Martin Soames' lawyer.
Boss? His prints match a set of prints found at the crime scene.
Great.
Another suspect.
Seems like David Hornby's got a lot of explaining to do.
Annie? You know him.
Annie? Annie? I need a word.
Ken, get hold of him and bring him in.
You need to take me off this case.
Why? David Hornby is the father of my baby.