DCI Banks Aftermath Episode Scripts

N/A - Buried (Part 1)

Ah! Nearly.
Not bad for an oldie.
Less of the old, thank you very much.
Remember who's buying you lunch.
Again.
Don't take forever in the shower if you want to get that dress.
Yeah, yeah.
~ Is dad busy? ~ He's expecting you.
Wow, that is beautiful.
And it looks scarily expensive.
Best not to ask.
~ Don't be late.
~ Course I won't.
~ See you later, honey.
~ I'll see you later.
Thanks, Mum.
~ I'm gonna have to meet you at the concert.
~ Oh? I've got a meeting this afternoon.
Love you.
Holly, did my wife say anything to you about a meeting this afternoon? No, me neither.
No reason.
Thank you.
Goodbye.
This is Anaan Kamel.
Please leave a message.
If your call is urgent, please contact my secretary on 0113 496 0632.
I've been going through your mother's stuff and well, I thought that Tracey might like this.
~ Dad, are you sure? ~ She would be pleased to know that her granddaughter had got it.
Tracey will be thrilled.
It's a lovely thought.
~ It might be nice to think that it's going to get used again one day.
~ Yeah.
After all, it's not going to be much use for you, is it? Sewerage workers found her this morning.
Any idea how she got here? She clearly had been in the water but the level dropped overnight, so she could have been thrown in anywhere.
~ Are we looking at all the relevant CCTV? ~ Tariq's on it.
~ Any ID? ~ Nothing on her.
That's a nice watch.
If it's genuine it will have a serial number.
Let's start with that.
Mr Kamel, I'm DCI Banks, this is DI Morton.
May we come in, please? Oh, God, no.
Thank you.
Anaan was supposed to join me at Nafeesah's concert last night.
She didn't show.
I was worried.
I just assumed she had been delayed.
And you tried calling her? Yes, of course,but she wasn't ans- I told myself there was any number of good reasons why she wasn't answering.
And then eventually that's when I reported it.
Can you think of a reason why anyone would want to hurt your wife? No.
No, of course not.
Single gunshot wound.
It exited here, just below the collarbone.
So, she was shot in the back? ~ Running away? ~ That's what killed her? She didn't drown? There's no sign of haemorrhaging in the middle ear and no water or debris in her stomach.
Was she dead before she went into the water? ~ It looks like it.
~ There was no bullet found at the scene.
~ Probably in the river.
~ How long do you think she'd been in there? Not wrong.
A few hours.
No genital bruising so it doesn't look like rape.
As to whether or not she'd had consensual sex, ~ no traces of semen but then she had been in the water.
~ OK.
I found these though.
Small bruises here on her jaw and cheek.
Old, from a couple of weeks ago.
It's possible someone hit her.
Thank you.
Dad? The police are here.
Sorry if we are disturbing anything.
No.
No, you're not.
This is Bilal, my wife's brother.
Hiya.
I came to pay my respects.
And now he's leaving.
Actually, since you're here I'd like a word, if I may.
~ Yes, yes, of course.
~ Thank you.
~ I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions.
~ Yeah.
Were you very close to your sister? Er, not as much as I'd have liked.
Why was that? I think I made her .
.
uncomfortable.
She was not ~ devout.
~ You felt she didn't take her faith seriously enough? My sister didn't take her faith seriously at all.
I work for a charity.
For the last eight years I have lived in Pakistan.
It was only when I came back, I saw the extent to which she had, er .
.
lost her way.
How would you describe her marriage? Oh, you'd have to ask Raheel, but I don't think she was happy.
Why? Because I think my sister was being disloyal to her husband.
Why do you say that? I saw her with a man in a cafe.
They were talking, their heads very close.
I asked her about it afterwards.
She told me I was mistaken.
But I wasn't.
I know what I saw.
So, your wife had some bruising on her face.
She fell a couple of weeks ago.
Can you tell me exactly what happened? No, I wasn't here.
I was in court in Sheffield.
I had to stay over.
You were here though, weren't you, darling? Mum fell on the stairs.
She hit her head.
~ Could you show me? ~ What? ~ Where she fell.
~ Is this completely necessary? It would be very useful for me to see.
Thank you.
She was there.
She caught her heel in the carpet.
And then she fell all the way down? Yeah.
So, what did they say at A and E? We didn't go.
~ Why was that? ~ Mum was a bit shaken, that's all.
Nothing broken.
That was lucky.
I don't buy it.
A fall like that should have left Anaan Kamel with bruises on her legs and arms but there weren't any.
Well, maybe someone did take a swing at her.
The brother thinks that Anaan was having an affair.
What, thinks or knows? It is easy to look at a marriage from the outside and think you know what's going on.
But if she was having an affair and Raheel found out Even if he did beat her up, doesn't mean that he was the person that killed her.
But if he did, it suggests that he knew.
~ It gives him motive.
~ What, to shoot her? Maybe not pull the trigger himself but to pay someone else to do it.
Ken, Raheel Kamel said he was in Sheffield on the 21st.
~ Can you get it checked out? ~ Yeah.
I've got Anaan Kamel on camera from yesterday.
3:32, she leaves Chambers, heads up Park Row.
And then we pick her up here, where she has a coffee and waits.
Well, who for? Watch.
The car's registered to a Marcus Leyton, address in Burley.
Here's where it gets interesting.
He works at Anaan's Chambers.
Good work.
Go to the Chambers, find out all you can about him.
Helen, you and I will head to Burley.
Well, it should be in the airing cupboard, James.
Yeah, with the other clean stuff.
I don't know, you'll just have to ask Dad.
Yeah, and did you give a message to Jake? Oh.
That - Don't worry.
It's fine.
(No, it doesn't matter.
) All right.
Yeah.
Bye then, bye.
~ OK? ~ Yeah.
I checked with the neighbours.
No-one's seen him since yesterday lunchtime.
And no one ever saw him bring anyone back so if Marcus was having an affair with Anaan Kamel it doesn't look like they met here.
Boss.
Wow.
Beats stuffing it under a mattress, I suppose.
Frozen assets.
Yes, Annie, what is it? OK.
Find out what you can.
It seems that Marcus Leyton was sacked by his chambers two and a half weeks ago.
Mr Kamel did it in person, came down to the accounts office himself.
Do you know why he was sacked? Something about messing up the tax returns, I think.
Anyway, Marcus went ballistic.
Said all sorts of things, threatening Mr Kamel and that, said he'd be sorry, that he'd pay for this.
Did Mrs Kamel have much to do with Marcus? Not really.
Sometimes she'd stay late and they'd go through the expenses.
What was it like, the Kamels being married and working in the same office? They were pretty good, I think.
If there was a problem at home, they tried to leave it there.
Didn't always succeed, of course.
~ What, they had rows here? ~ No.
Just you know, looks.
~ Recently? ~ Nothing you could put your finger on.
But plenty of silence, you know what I mean? OK.
So, where did this money in the freezer come from? Was Marcus Leyton into drugs? Did he bet? Was he stealing from chambers? Maybe that's what Raheel found out and that's why he sacked him.
But if Marcus was stealing, Raheel didn't report it.
I'll look into it, find out exactly why he was sacked.
So, Marcus, what, kidnaps Anaan and shoots her as revenge? Well, why not kill Raheel? That's who his argument was with.
Raheel Kamel was where he said he was when his wife got the bruises on her face.
He checked into the Astine hotel in Sheffield at 6:37 PM.
So his daughter wasn't covering for him.
I think she's covering for someone.
I think we need to talk about your mother's fall, Nafeesah.
I don't want to.
You don't know what he's like.
Who? You know who hurt your mother.
No more covering up.
Tell us who did this.
Bilal.
My uncle.
Boss.
Bilal Suleman's done time.
Two years as a young offender.
~ For what? ~ Possession of firearms.
I'm gonna go over and see him right now.
Mr Suleman? ~ DI Morton.
~ DC Lang.
We'd like to ask you a few questions down at the station.
~ About? ~ It's in connection with the death of your sister.
I didn't attack her.
We argued, she fell.
What were you arguing about? I disapproved of what she was doing.
~ I wanted her to change her ways.
~ You accused her of having an affair.
Yes.
Of treating her marriage with disrespect.
~ Which she didn't like.
~ Facing the truth can sometimes be painful.
And she had bruises to prove it, didn't she? My sister told me to mind my own business.
I told her I couldn't do that.
She was angry.
She pushed me.
~ I - ~ Pushed her back.
She caught her foot on the curb and fell.
It was an accident.
Why didn't you stay to help her? She told me to get out of her sight.
So you ran away, leaving your sister lying injured in the street? ~ I'm not proud of that.
~ But you are proud of confronting her in the first place? Possession of a firearm.
I was looking after the gun for a friend.
I was young, stupid, but I am grateful for my time in prison because being there, I saw how far I'd strayed, how wrong my values had been.
And did you share these insights with your sister? My faith's very important to me.
It used to be for Anaan.
~ Until she married.
~ You blame Raheel? He's a shallow man.
He doesn't believe in God.
The day my sister married him was the day she started to lose her sense of what's right.
Where were you yesterday? At prayers.
You can check with the imam.
Thanks.
We will.
We tracked Marcus Leyton's car after he picked up Anaan.
He headed out of town and joined the M1 ~ but we lost him at junction 47.
~ How come? The camera is out on the exit.
~ He could have gone anywhere.
~ His photo's with every news outlet and we've got a locate-and-trace on the car.
Anything in his profile? Not much, except there's no records before 2009.
~ Could have been abroad.
~ A 32-year-old man with only five years of records.
Keep digging.
You think Marcus is our killer? Well, he was the last person to see Anaan alive and now he's missing.
What about the brother? Wouldn't be the first person to kill a relative.
~ Honour killing? ~ It's possible.
~ It's a bit convenient, isn't it? ~ He admits to hurting her in the street, plus he has a history with firearms.
Most honour killings are done in the home with weapons to hand.
Knives, suffocation, strangulation, not bullets.
~ So, do you think he's innocent? ~ I'm not saying that.
Just it's too easy to see a dead Muslim woman and shout honour killing.
It's a fair point, Tariq, but I'm not ruling him out yet.
Anything on Anaan Kamel's profile? I've looked through her financial records.
Nothing out of the ordinary.
Cash withdrawals, gym membership, bills.
She swam at the gym the day she was murdered.
~ OK? ~ Thank you.
We got these off the phone.
~ And they are all to Marcus Leyton? ~ To and from, calls, texts, their own private phone.
No need to wonder if they were having an affair.
Not sure it lasted.
What? 'Secrets cost.
2K.
Tomorrow.
' ~ He was blackmailing her? ~ Yeah.
I've never seen this phone before.
We found it in your wife's gym locker.
Why would she have kept it there? Mr Kamel, we believe that Marcus Leyton was blackmailing your wife.
What do you mean? ~ It seems they were having a relationship.
~ What? And he threatened to reveal it.
Where were you the day your wife was killed? You can't possibly think that Please, answer the question, Mr Kamel.
I was in Chambers until the early afternoon and then I went to a meeting with a client and their solicitor and then I was at Nafeesah's concert.
You sacked Marcus Leyton suddenly a few weeks ago.
~ Had you found out about the affair? ~ No.
Was he stealing money from the business? I don't think so, no.
Can you think why he would have thousands of pounds in cash hidden in his home? I don't have the faintest idea.
Marcus Leyton worked in the accounts department.
He screwed up the annual return.
Beyond that I had nothing to do with him.
Forensic report on Anaan Kamel is in.
Minute traces of hippuris vulgaris were found in the roof of her mouth.
It's mare's tail and it's a weed and it only grows upstream from where she was found.
~ And you've located where upstream? ~ Yeah.
There's three distinct locations.
Calbeck, Rosmell Bridge, and Calverley.
~ And one of those is where she was killed? ~ Yeah, I reckon.
~ Is it Marcus Leyton? ~ Yeah, got his driving licence.
There's one shot through the windscreen.
There's a bullet here, lodged in the headrest.
So, it's definitely not a murder-suicide.
Good, old-fashioned murder murder.
Yeah.
So from the tracks, it looks like the killer drove past them here and parked up.
We're getting tyre impressions done now.
From the angle, I'd say that the killer was shorter than me.
Because Marcus is still sitting, I'd say he was shot first, Anaan panics and just makes a run for it.
The killer follows her, shoots her once in the back, she falls, the killer must have picked the body up, tipped her into the water, and she floated downstream until she fetched up in the city.
~ Murder weapon? ~ No.
~ Boss? Whoever was down there obviously had a clear eye line and something made them abandon the fishing gear.
I think we may have ourselves a witness.
~ Maggots.
~ Sorry? Our fishermen left these at the scene.
No usable prints on the box but you're gonna get the maggots tested for DNA traces.
~ How come? ~ Fishermen sometimes put maggots in their mouths to warm them up.
~ Sorry I asked.
~ Nice bit of lean protein in there for you, Tariq.
You are gross.
Even if we get a trace, it might not match anything on the database.
So we also chase these fishing flies.
They belong to our witness.
Who makes them, who sells them, who do they sell them to? Thanks.
I think I'd rather be on maggots.
He was killed by a single 9 mm bullet.
Death would have been instantaneous.
Anything else? He had spaghetti bolognese for lunch and a glass of wine.
Had he had sex? No traces of semen on his clothes or in the car.
So whatever the two of them were doing in that car, it wasn't sexual.
Unless their coitus got very interruptus.
What else? He'd had a significant injury in the past.
A broken leg, a nasty one.
~ He needed a couple of pins.
~ How long ago? ~ Six, seven years, I'd say.
~ Well, those pins are traceable then.
Can you find out when they were put in? ~ I can try.
Why? ~ Because according to the records, he didn't exist until five years ago.
Nafeesah.
The police arrested me.
I know you told them about what happened with your mother.
I just want to explain.
~ Dad's waiting for me at home.
~ Well, let me take you.
We can talk on the way.
I loved your mother.
I love you.
Please.
Our main suspect is now Raheel Kamel.
Did he know about his wife's affair? He seemed genuinely shocked when we told him.
His alibi for the shooting stack up.
He was in a meeting.
We're trying to track down the solicitor that he was with.
It doesn't stop him from arranging the murders though.
I know that we've treated him with kid gloves so far, grieving widower and all that, but I want to push him further.
Full profile, known associates, bank details, the works.
Maybe there's another motive, any recent life-insurance policies.
We've discovered one secret about their marriage, let's see if there's any more.
Your mother made some very bad choices.
Is that why you hurt her? Do you honestly think I could kill my own sister, Nafeesah? I don't know what to think.
The police keep asking questions.
They say Mum was seeing someone behind Dad's back.
And Dad's stopped eating.
I heard him crying himself to sleep last night.
Your father is the reason all this is happening.
~ How can you say that? ~ Your mother lost her way because of him.
Forgot who she was.
~ That's rubbish.
~ And the same thing is happening to you.
~ What? ~ I saw you just now.
With that boy.
I'd like to get out.
You have to listen to me.
Why? Don't you see? I You have to be true to your faith.
Because you say so? Because I don't want what happened to your mother to happen to you.
Argh! Nafeesah! Naf- Urgh! Nafeesah! Nafeesah! Nafeesah! We traced one of the flies and this one's rare.
Made in America and it's only available over here online.
Find out who they sold it to in the last six months.
We're already on it.
Nafeesah! ~ Just keep away from me.
~ I just want to talk! Dad? Open the door! Dad! Leave me alone! Dad! Forensics are back on tyre impressions left at the scene.
~ What are we looking at? ~ According to the wheel base, estimated turning radius and vehicle stance, a sixth generation Golf, pre-2013.
Great, because there aren't many of those out there (!) Assuming the shooter is still driving it.
Thanks, Tariq.
~ Come on, there's been a report of a domestic called in by a neighbour.
~ What? It's at Raheel Kamel's.
He just went for me.
He kept saying it was all my fault.
~ What was? ~ What happened to Anaan.
He said I was responsible.
It was crazy.
Saying awful things about Mum.
That if Dad had loved her - I tried to get him to leave but he wouldn't stop so ~ I pushed him.
~ He grabbed Dad and then pushed him in here and they both fell and I - I couldn't stand it.
~ I was very afraid.
I thought he was - ~ So you hit him with that? No.
I did.
I was afraid.
So, it was your niece that struck you? Yes.
I know what she thinks.
What you think.
But I fear for Nafeesah.
Like I feared for her mother.
I know you don't believe this because your mind is already made up But I loved my sister with all my heart.
I would never hurt her.
I just want her back.
Helen? That was the pathologist.
We were right.
The serial number on the metal pin shows it was inserted into the leg of a Steven Cadley at Nottingham University Hospital.
So, Marcus Leyton was really Steven Cadley.
Right up to the moment that he entered witness protection.
The reason there's no record of Marcus Leyton before 2009 is because he was actually Steven Cadley.
Lived on the Carswell estate in Nottingham.
A bit flash, by all accounts.
Liked spending money, even when he didn't have it, which got him into trouble, mostly with this guy, Lewis Hargreaves, loan shark and money-launderer.
Between 2006 and 2009, Hargreaves' money-lending business had a turnover of just under three million quid.
I am so in the wrong job.
You only just realised? So why didn't they just bang this Hargreaves up? Because no one would give evidence against him.
Not only would he hand out the routine beatings, he'd also threaten to rape wives, daughters, sons, he's not picky.
No one until Steven Cadley, that is.
Steven had agreed to give evidence against Hargreaves in return for a new identity.
Hargreaves got five years.
Steven became Marcus Leyton.
He got a new ID and moved an hour and a half away? They moved him to Edinburgh but he slipped the leash after a few months.
WPU lost him.
~ So why did he come here? ~ We don't know but we have a new prime suspect.
Helen, you and I are going to Nottingham.
Annie and Ken, you need to find that witness.
We've narrowed it down.
11 blokes in the greater Leeds area ~ bought that fly in the last six months.
~ Good.
Sounds like you've both got some doors to knock on.
~ Tariq, brief the rest of the team, please.
~ Yeah.
Lewis Hargreaves had Steven Cadley's leg broken with a hammer.
Explains the pins.
~ Do you know how much Steven had borrowed? ~ Go on.
200 quid.
And Hargreaves was charging 1,437% interest.
Don't you just love the free market economy (!) I thought my credit card rate was steep.
Who does that? You know, you rob a bank, jewellery store, I can, sort of, understand that but targeting people who don't have anything to begin with, who are so desperate that they have to go to a loan shark ~ and then to squeeze them ~ Without ever quite cutting off the revenue stream.
It's quite a business model.
You think Hargreaves looks in the mirror at night and says, that was a day well spent? Do you? Not as often as I'd like.
~ How many more? ~ Two more after this.
Are you sure this is the right address? Maybe he's gone away.
~ Who is it? ~ Police.
Can we have a word, Mr Dwyer? ~ Come in.
~ Thanks.
Thank you.
Someone's been spending some money.
Do you think anyone's in? I think that constitutes repeated knocking, don't you, DI Morton? I believe it does, DCI Banks, according to the terms of this search warrant.
Gentlemen.
Police officers! Police! Right, Helen, you organise down here.
~ We'll start upstairs.
~ All right, boss.
It had been a crap day, to be honest.
Not a single bite.
I was think about changing spot when the BMW arrived.
On its own? Other side of the bridge.
Just tell us exactly what happened.
Then this other car suddenly drove up.
Bloke got out, went over to the BMW.
He had this gun.
And he just fired.
Then the passenger door opened, this woman got out, was screaming, trying to get away.
The bloke shot her too then pushed her in the river.
I must have made a noise then because he looked, he looked right at me.
So he saw you? ~ I legged it.
~ You really should have reported it.
He saw me.
I was shitting myself.
Did you get a good look at him? Of course I did.
He was a few yards away, pointing a bloody gun at me.
Was it him? No.
Can you describe him? I'm not about to forget.
We're gonna need you to come to the station and put together an e-fit.
Ah, I dunno.
I mean, he's still out there.
We need your help, Mr Dwyer.
So does this mean I'll have to give evidence? ~ One thing at a time, eh? ~ Tariq here's gonna look after you.
Sarge, you might want to catch this one while the DCI isn't here.
He was brought in an hour ago.
Pushed a traffic warden.
If you'd like to follow me.
Well, somebody owes me 200 bloody quid for my front door.
That would be me, Mr Hargreaves.
They're saying you pushed the warden.
Oh.
Jobsworth.
~ Mr Banks - ~ Anne.
~ Arthur.
~ Arthur.
You can't do that.
I'm sorry, I didn't know I'd parked in the wrong place.
I wasn't paying attention.
You didn't see the sign? I can't remember.
Ever since Ida passed, huge chunks of the day just go by.
I can't remember what happened or how I got there.
Without Ida, you see, I'm lost.
Steven Cadley.
~ What about him? ~ He's dead.
That's what you wanted, isn't it? I didn't give him a moment's thought.
The man who put you away? Come on.
I got out about a year ago.
Why would I still be worried about Steven? Because I'm guessing that you like to play the big man.
You get off on people being scared of you.
And little Steven Cadley brought you down.
~ No.
~ You wanted to send out a message, cross me and this is what happens.
And I glad someone popped him? Yeah.
Did I do it myself? No.
No, because you have people to do that sort of thing for you.
Even if you are right, and I did harbour some burning desire for revenge, I couldn't do much about it, could I? I didn't even know where he was.
Really? That's funny because I've just found this, over there in your bin.
That's Steven Cadley in Leeds.
You knew where he was.
You knew he'd changed his name to Marcus Leyton.
You had a score to settle and you sent someone to do it.
Lewis Hargreaves, I'm arresting you for conspiracy to murder Steven Cadley.
You do not have to say anything but it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court.
Anything you do say may be given in evidence.
~ Do you understand? ~ Come on, son.
Don't worry.
I know a man who knows a man at the council.
I'm sure I can convince them not to get too heavy-handed.
Thanks.
And the ticket? Make sure you pay it within 30 days.
It goes up after that.
What's he like? Alan? What's he like as a boss? Not too shabby.
You should be proud.
I am.
Why don't you tell him? Sarge? We've got the e-fit.
Great.
Circulate it, get it over to Nottingham, see if anyone recognises him.
Let him stew overnight.
Yeah, we'll start on him in the morning.
Boss? Nottingham police just got back to us on the e-fit.
They know exactly who it is.
Jacky Mullen.
We already know that he's done muscle work for Lewis Hargreaves.
He's ex-army, served in Afghanistan.
I spoke to his old commanding officer.
Mullen was discharged after being diagnosed with PTSD.
I want to see his face on every TV bulletin, every newspaper.
Is he still driving the same Golf? If not, what's he driving now? He's out there, he's dangerous, he's already killed two people.
We've got to find him.
A-ha.
Room service.
Recognise him? ~ You know I do.
~ You sent him to kill Steven Cadley.
~ No.
~ Only Steven had someone with him.
Jacky Mullen killed them too.
That's two murders, Lewis, even if you didn't pull the trigger.
But don't worry, I'll send someone to turn your bed down.
~ Problem? ~ Yeah, I left the lights on.
The battery is flat.
~ I'll give you a lift.
~ No, it's fine.
~ It's no trouble.
~ I can get the bus, honestly.
Don't be daft.
Michael and the kids will be worried.
Come on.
Yeah.
(Stupid.
) (Thank you.
) ~ OK, see you tomorrow.
~ Yep.
~ Are you OK? ~ Yeah, fine, just tired.
Yeah.
Good lad.
Socks on the right.
Pants on the left.
The council aren't gonna press charges.
Annie spoke to them this evening.
I liked her.
She got oomph.
Yes, she has.
Too good for you, mind.
Probably.
The thing is, Dad, you can't go around shoving people.
Ah, now we're onto it.
~ What? ~ That's why you're here.
Waggle your finger, tell me what a naughty boy I've been.
No.
You were lucky this time.
~ If Annie hadn't been there - ~ What right does he have, that warden? The copper? While I've while I just I just miss her so much.
Me too, Dad.
Me too.
~ Boss? ~ Annie, listen, thanks for looking after Dad.
~ I owe you one.
~ 'Is he all right?' ~ Yeah.
~ 'Listen, where are you?' ~ Why? What is it? ~ 'Our witness, Geoff Dwyer, something's happened.
' Geoff Dwyer's daughter found it when she got home.
~ Her boyfriend gave her a lift.
~ That? Whoever did it got in at the back.
No one saw anything.