ER Episode Scripts

s02e09

Doug? - Doug? - He's not here.
- I need you to take a look at little Susie.
- I'm not on yet, am I? You're a pediatrician.
You're always on.
Yes, but I'm not your pediatrician.
What time is it? Six a.
m.
She was up half the night coughing.
All right.
Hey there, little one.
What's going on? Let's see.
She's pretty agreeable.
That's because I kept her company for the last five hours.
What's the matter? I got elbowed in the Mommy and Me class yesterday.
- Sounds vicious.
- Oh, yeah.
It was.
I had the blue end of the parachute, and little Susie was underneath and this yuppie mother came by and yanked it and shoved me! I'm telling you, this mother thing is not easy.
You wouldn't know it by her.
No temperature.
Lungs are clear.
No sore throat.
This is the healthiest, happiest baby that I have ever seen.
Oh, God, I'm never gonna make Gymboree tonight.
Doug, paramedics are at the back door with an infant, unresponsive.
- You need a hand? - Always.
- Bye-bye.
Can you hold her for a sec? - Sure.
Hey, little Susie.
- What do you got? - Two-month-old male unconscious and cyanotic in his crib.
- What is it? What's wrong? - He was fine last night.
Unresponsive at scene.
Gave him two rounds of epi and atropine in the field.
- Got nothing.
- He just had a little bit of a cold.
I just took him to a pediatrician yesterday.
Tube him.
Number four uncuffed.
Hook up a compression, will you? - Number one, straight laryngoscope.
- I need tape on the tube.
Here you go.
- Temperature? - It's 93.
It wasn't a bad cold, not even a fever.
Deep tendon reflexes absent.
He's unresponsive to pain.
Try a high-dose epi.
- What's he weigh? Ten pounds? - Twelve.
- Asystole.
- Point five.
- Did our doctor miss something? - What's your name? - Kenway.
- Okay, we need you to wait outside.
What's wrong with him? Haleh.
- We need to let the doctors work.
- I want to stay with my baby, please.
- That's okay.
I'll get that.
- Anything on the monitor yet? - No petechiae or ecchymosis.
- Another dose of epi? - What's his down time? - Forty-five minutes.
- Any pulse? - No.
- Pupils fixed and dilated.
No rhythm.
I'm gonna shock him.
Charging.
Susan.
Susan, it's over.
Susan, it's over.
It's over.
I'll mark the chart.
- SIDS.
- Lydia, take him off the monitor.
I'll get his parents back in here.
Will you stay with him? You gotta look at that face.
She was fast asleep.
Weren't you? - Thank you, Conni.
- You're welcome.
Here you go.
Yeah.
What? Yeah.
You're my little girl.
My little girl.
Yeah.
I love you.
Yeah, I love you.
Yeah, I love you.
Yeah.
- Hi! - Hi.
- You look awful.
- Post-op.
Two hours' sleep.
- How does tonight look? - Good, if Benton ever lets me out.
- It's been, like, two days.
- It's been, like, over two days.
I have a couple of hours tonight between 6 and 8.
Your place? - Dr.
Wolverton.
- Hi.
- Come with me.
- Where? This way.
Hold the elevator.
Where are the films on the Spencer kid? - Radiology's backed up.
- Damn.
Four West again.
- Gabriel's calcium back yet? - Normal.
It's on his chart.
Neuro's consulting on Weingast.
The films are? - Yeah, in the reading room.
- Next time leave it bedside.
This way.
Haleh, sorry.
- Hey, I could use some help here.
- Now? - No, next Labor Day.
- We'll send somebody.
- We'll clean it up.
- Later.
- When we get back from.
- Radiology.
Conni? Oh, hi.
Dropped the lateral decubitus.
Could you hand me those charts? - We came looking for the films on.
- Smith, John.
- They don't appear to be here, so.
- We'll be back.
Close call.
- Could you give me a hand? - Sure.
No problem.
- Right here okay? - Great.
- You want a bite? - No.
Oh, God, I do.
I missed breakfast.
- What's in the boxes? - Something for me? It's for the children's Christmas drive.
Oh, yeah, there's gonna be one lucky 4-year-old who gets this.
- I haven't sorted through it yet.
- Is it secret Santa time already? Almost.
And I arranged for you to get me, so make it good.
My mom sold the house.
- Helen's moving? - Yeah, to the 'burbs.
She's been storing this stuff in her basement for years.
Now Carol is pawning it off on some unsuspecting 4-year-old.
- No, I'm gonna toss half of it.
- You never throw away this stuff.
- My mom's a saver, not me.
- KC and the Sunshine Band? Yeah, you could toss that.
- Whoa, this.
- Come on, now.
- You never twirled a baton.
- No, I did.
I did.
I did.
Something like this.
Okay.
Scalp lac in 3.
- Anyone seen Carter? - No.
What is it? You're not a Catholic, are you? - Said good-bye to the old homestead? - Yep.
- Must be hard.
- No, not really.
When my folks sold their place I went back there, and I carved my name into every closet.
- It's just a house.
- It's a home, Hathaway! It's got little height measurements on the kitchen door.
It's got a banister where I fell and broke my collarbone.
It's got this cool crawl space where my brothers and I used to hide our Playboys.
- Playboys? - Yeah, when we were kids.
- So no ID on this patient? - Nope, nothing.
We found him at the Goodman.
He's been sitting there for a while.
Shepard, you gotta move your rig.
- I need someone to cover a shift.
- Not tonight.
I'm sorry.
- Bet she'd take a rain check.
- Sorry, it's something I can't move.
Hit-and-run's here.
- You need a hand? - Yeah.
- What's open? - Trauma 1.
- Doris? -35-year-old male.
Auto versus pedestrian.
BP 110/65.
Pulse tachy at 120.
Possible mandible fracture.
Five hundred cc bolus normal saline.
O-210 liters, and hare traction on the left leg.
On my count one, two, three.
Back to the slopes.
See you.
- What's his name? - Ethan Brown.
Mr.
Brown, you're in the ER.
You were hit by a car.
Need a cross-table C-spine.
Here you go.
Chest.
Pelvis, left femur, mandible.
CBC, type and cross four units -Chem-7.
- My wife! Don't talk.
Your jaw might be broken.
We'll contact your wife.
I'll get a Foley in.
Pressure's good, 125/80.
Midshaft fractured femur.
- Good distal pulses.
- Abdomen's benign.
Droperidol 2.
5, slow IV push.
And let's watch his pressure.
- What happened? - Someone ran him down.
Interviewing witnesses now.
TMs are clear, no Battles Sign.
Clear CT.
No, no, no, Mr.
Brown.
Mr.
Brown, leave the mask on.
Okay, calm down, calm down.
Hi.
I'm Carol.
What's your name? Why do you ask that? Just curious.
Mr.
Sullivan.
Can't smoke in here, Mr.
Sullivan.
Suture kit.
Thanks.
Can you hang out? I'm not sure he's gonna need any.
Can you hand me that saline? May I borrow a pencil, please? Why is your arm bleeding, Mr.
Sullivan? I work for the committee.
I'm an architect.
This is a pen.
Here you go.
How's this? Is there someone we can call to take you home? Why do you ask? I mean, I know where it is.
He's not gonna need any stitches, but call Psych and Social Services.
- Get Matthews.
- He's got the interview.
- Well, then get Jones to do it.
- They all got interviews.
Vucelich is never gonna pick a third-year.
You ought to apply.
It'd be great for your career.
And yours.
You have a hematoma on your neck.
- What do we have? - Hit-and-run, moderate velocity.
Left femur fracture, head trauma.
- What is he on? - Droperidol for agitation.
- We couldn't control him.
- Got Mr.
Brown's films.
There's a shadow in the right base.
Carter, hemothorax.
- Pulse up 120.
- I'll set up a Thora-Seal.
Sats falling.
- Number 32 French.
- I know.
Curved Kelly.
- I'm in! - Anyone call CT? Yeah.
They're ready for him.
Suction.
It's draining.
His real name is Joshua Shem.
A diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic.
Ran away from his residential home.
They faxed us this.
Prolixin, Thorazine, Trilafon, even Clozaril.
Won't stay on any of them.
- It's the third time he ran away? - They won't take him back.
Three strikes and you're out.
Any family? - I'm still trying to track his mother down.
- Okay, thanks.
Randi, could you find me the number to Campanelli's? You don't wanna go there, Dr.
Ross.
Excuse me? Drafty, stuffy, and the pasta is kind of iffy.
- Anyone we know? - What's this? - You said you couldn't work tonight.
- Personal obligation.
We got failure to fly in 3.
A kid fell off his bunk bed.
- You care to join me? - Okay.
Ethan! Oh, my God! Is he hurt? Is he gonna die? No, he's not gonna die, but you can't.
- You can't go with him! - I'm his wife.
Mrs.
Brown, your husband has been in a serious accident.
We're taking him up for a head CT but his injuries do not appear to be life-threatening.
- Then he's not gonna die? - No, he'll be fine.
Come with me.
I'll show you.
- My sister is unconscious.
- What happened? She had a skating accident.
They took care of her at St.
Anne's sent her home.
But in the car she started shaking all over.
- Sounds like a seizure.
What's her name? - Reba.
I couldn't wake her up.
Reba! Reba, can you hear me? She's postictal.
Let's start a line.
- Does she have a history of seizures? - No.
We were at the skating rink, and a boy ran into her.
- Her legs were cut badly.
- Pupils equal, round, reactive.
- Did she hit her head? - I think so.
She had a headache.
- Were x-rays taken? - I don't know.
They stitched up her legs.
Responsive to pain.
BP 120/70, pulse 56.
- We need a head CT.
- What's going on? Your sister had a seizure, which can happen after a head injury.
We'll take an x-ray of her brain to make sure there's no bleeding, okay? Okay.
A small gold pendant would be nice.
Earrings.
Ford Explorer.
Thank you, Lydia.
I'll keep those in mind.
How serious? Seizure after head trauma.
They saw her at St.
Anne's.
Barkley's the chief there.
You want me to call? - They didn't even do a CT.
- Hey, doctor.
- We wrapped up that hit-and-run.
- That quick? Witness ID'd the plates.
Get this, it was his wife.
Come on.
- Lydia, where's Brown? - Who? - Ethan Brown who got hit by a car.
- Exam 4.
Call Security.
Die! You bastard! - I hate you! I'm gonna kill you! - Get her out of here! - Let go of me! - Cyanotic.
Pulse ox's down to 70.
Hyperventilate him.
Blood gas? - What was that about? - Marital bliss.
After dinner, power Christmas shopping.
Everything for everyone in under three hours.
You could shop for Jennifer and Rachel.
Rachel's getting a bike.
Jennifer already has her present.
I agreed to spend four, count them, four wintry days with her folks in Sheboygan.
Four days with the Reverend? Go with God.
- How's she doing? - She's coming around.
Hi, Reba.
I'm Dr.
Lewis.
Do you know where you are? Hospital.
- Do you remember what happened? - No.
It's normal to be confused after a seizure.
We wanna keep her in the hospital for a while under-- Valium, five.
- What's happening? - Valium, five! - Pulse ox 85.
- Put her back on the mask.
Help her, please! Dr.
Vucelich.
Carter.
John Carter.
Carter, yes.
I'm gonna see your Dr.
Matthews at 5, right? No, actually, I'm Dr.
Benton's student.
In that case, I look forward to seeing him later, then.
No, actually, he's not signed up.
He wanted to be, but I believe your list was full.
You don't have to cover for him.
If the man isn't interested.
No, he is definitely interested.
To be honest, I forgot to sign him up.
And he was pretty upset about it.
I see.
I guess I'm gonna have to cover for you then.
Why don't you send him in at 6.
I think it's a hickey you have on your neck, Carter.
Yeah, yeah.
That makes 20 of Valium.
- How long has she been seizing? -10 minutes.
Load her with Dilantin, She's probably tearing her sutures out.
- Is she on any drugs? - No.
- Diabetic? - No.
- Is she allergic to lidocaine? - Lidocaine? Like Novocain.
They'd give it to her before the sutures.
I don't know.
They were injecting her with a lot of stuff.
Hold the Dilantin.
Eight hundred phenobarb.
Could be lidocaine toxicity.
- Get a level.
- One hundred in.
Conni, get a hold of Dr.
Barkley at St.
Anne's and have him fax her chart.
- I know I gave you nights off this week.
- Thank you.
Not that it did any good.
Hudson pleaded with me to cover for him tonight.
- You couldn't cover for Bowers? - I'm good, but not that good.
Reba Siburry's seizures.
St.
Anne's gave her a toxic dose of lidocaine? - Her level was nine.
- I missed all the fun.
This'll make a terrific case report.
Morgenstern wants someone to present a paper at the SAEM conference.
- I could use the credit.
- The hospital pays for the trip.
- Trip? - It's in Miami.
It sounds like a terrific opportunity.
- I can't write and present a paper.
- Sure you can.
- And take care of Susie? - I thought your dad was gonna help.
I still barely have time to get dressed in the morning.
I could help you with your schedule here.
That's great, but I can't spend my days off in the library doing research.
- And a trip? - Okay.
- Are you disappointed? - Of course not.
- Do you think I should do it? - It's your decision.
Do your voices tell you to harm yourself? - Harm anyone else? - Voice, voices, voices.
I don't-- I don't hear voices.
You wanna stay in the hospital? I'm not crazy or whatever you think.
You might wanna try new medicines, fewer side effects-- Thank you.
No.
I have work to.
May I? Here, Josh.
- How you gonna eat, Josh? - The Colonel makes me chicken.
- And sleep? - I'm building a house.
- It's cold outside.
- I know! I have a jacket! I know how to take care of myself.
- I'm a man.
- Okay.
Josh, it was nice meeting you.
Come on, let's go.
- Can you hold him? - Nope.
Not even for a day? I can place him in a halfway house.
He's in no danger to himself or anyone else.
There's nothing I can do.
Can he take care of himself on the street? - He claims he can.
- And you take his word for it? I didn't write the law.
He's an adult.
If he wants to go, he goes.
Guess Joshua is off his checklist for the day.
He must get 30 cases like this a month.
He does what he can.
- So, what do we do? - Well, we try and stall him.
Hope that a home comes through, wait for the mother to show.
I got Benton that interview at 6.
It's 15 minutes to your house.
That gives us an hour and 20 minutes before study group, which is nothing.
- Look what you did to my neck.
- You're an incurable romantic.
- Only one problem, though.
- Carter! Oh, man.
I haven't told him yet.
See you later.
- Hi.
- I got a patient for you.
Great.
I was wondering, do you have plans this evening? I'm asking because I bumped into Dr.
Vucelich.
- And? - What? Nothing.
- You signed me up? - No, not really.
You better not have.
He requested you.
He thinks you'd be great for this study.
And he wants to talk to you about it in his office at 6.
Tonight.
Today.
Do a two percent block, irrigate.
Pull the nail.
No stitches.
Hi, Josh.
I have to go.
But we're not finished yet.
What? Hey, Josh.
This is really good.
I just draw what they tell me to.
I have to go home.
I have to.
- Where is your home? - I just bought one.
- Where? - Wicker Park, on Hoyne Street.
Oh, yeah.
Jugendstil, Proto-Modern.
I guess, maybe.
It's nice.
Very solid.
Turn of the century.
Living room.
Fireplace.
Copper inlay.
Tile.
No fireplace.
Just plaster walls.
No, you go behind.
It's there.
You'll see that it's there.
Thanks.
I didn't know I bought a Juggen, Joggan thing.
Stop it, stop it, stop it! - Hey, Josh, are you hungry? - I.
You should eat something.
I'll let you keep the pencil.
Okay? Okay? Okay.
Your Psych patient still here? - Consult been down? - Yep.
- Not admitted? - Nope.
Why hasn't he been discharged? I'd like to put a sterile dressing on his abrasion, antibiotic ointment.
As long as we have a bed, let's get him fed, cleaned up.
- Good idea.
- Okay, 7:00? You look beautiful whatever you wear.
I love you too.
Bye.
Your personal obligation? ER.
Hang on.
Dr.
Greene it's for you.
Willsborough Community Hospital.
Where's that? Milwaukee.
Hello? What happened? Oh, God! Is she all right? Rachel? My daughter? Of course.
I'll be there as soon as I can.
Mark? Jen and Rachel.
They're at a hospital.
I gotta catch a train.
- What happened? - Car accident.
- Is Rachel okay? - It's only Jen.
- Take my car.
Here you go.
- Thanks.
- Greene.
Jennifer Greene.
- Any news? No, they won't tell me anything.
Yeah.
Okay.
Thank you.
- Are we this bad when people call? - No.
I give complete and accurate information.
- Anyone know anyone over there? - I used to date one of their O.
R.
Techs.
- I haven't talked to him in six years.
- Dial.
- That's cool.
- A patient gave it to me.
Which patient's doing a drawing of the Sullivan Arch? Sullivan? Joshua calls himself Sullivan.
Louis, Lewis, something like that.
It's over at the Art Institute.
He says it's his home.
Unfortunately it's about to be true.
- Shep, no, no, no, give me that back.
- Oh, no.
Come on.
Is that you? - You were cute.
Stop, stop, stop! - Come on, give it back! - "To the coolest girl in the class.
" - Okay.
Very funny.
"I'll never forget what you did for me last summer at the lake.
Love, P.
J.
" Oh, yeah? What did you do to make him so grateful? It's a "her," not a "him.
" I was calming her down because she broke up with her boy-- - I don't need to be telling you this.
- This is great.
This is trash.
No.
This is going home.
You're gonna thank me one day.
This is good stuff.
Food poisoning in 4.
And Morgenstern wants to see you.
No, it's good news.
About presenting the lidocaine toxicity.
Mark told Morgenstern about the case? No, I did.
He was very excited.
This is a great opportunity.
- Finally got rid of that migraine in 5.
- Good.
Food poisoning in 4.
I can make that window of opportunity.
- My place at 6? - You got it.
Carter.
Harper.
I need to pull the drains on some post-ops.
- Your interview's at 6.
- Which is why you're gonna do it.
Harper, scalp lac in the Suture Room.
- I have food poisoning in 4.
- Well, after the food poisoning in 4.
Shem, Joshua.
He's 28.
Diagnosed schizophrenic.
- There's nothing.
- You gotta be kidding.
Six months? No.
I checked there too.
They don't have any beds.
Okay.
I'll try Carnegie House.
Okay, thanks.
Bye.
Doctor--? I see you've found all my patients.
And they're all grateful to still be with us.
Endarterectomies? Thanks, Claire.
Tell my wife I'll meet her at the restaurant.
You can't believe the Christmas presents.
- Must be hundreds.
- At least.
Why don't you come with me, Benton? I think you're gonna find this interesting.
- What about the interview? - This is it.
Excuse me.
I'm Madeline Shem.
Joshua's mother.
Hi.
I'm Carol Hathaway.
I'm glad you came.
- Was he hurt? - No, just a small abrasion on his arm.
We spoke to the residential home.
But they won't take him back, I know.
He's run away so much.
We've had no luck getting him into another.
Took us nine months to get him into that one.
- Could you take him home? - I wish.
Joshua's let go of everything.
His past, his family, our home.
None of it means anything to him anymore.
He'd never stay.
Hard to believe he was gonna be an architect.
Had a breakdown in college.
Hi, Josh.
I brought your pencils, sharpened just the way you like.
Thanks very much.
We've been waiting for these to arrive.
I give him money, which makes me feel better and his pencils, which makes him feel better.
It's really the only thing he still cares about.
Still.
I love you, Josh.
- Radial and ulnar pulses are strong.
- He's gonna need a tetanus.
Give him five of morphine, slow IV push.
- Give me the bullet.
- Impaled foreign body.
Fell off a ladder onto a Christmas reindeer display.
They're gonna fire me.
Through and through left deltoid.
Distal neuro and vascular intact.
- I crushed Rudolph.
- Darned expensive, those displays.
- Your last meal? - Breakfast.
No, no, lunch-- I don't know.
- Feel this? - Yeah.
BP is 140/85.
Pulse 110.
- O.
R.
Been notified? This? - It's killing me.
- O.
R.
's ready.
- Gram of Ancef.
Spectacular case earlier, Susan.
It's a shoo-in for presentation at the SAEM conference.
Might even make it in the Annals.
Doctors forget that a benign anesthetic has the potential for cardiac and neurological toxicity.
Let's get this puppy up to the O.
R.
Call upstairs.
Tell them we're en route.
I presented at the conference when I was a Resident.
Terrific case, terrific opportunity.
I left the visual aids on the plane.
I have to decline your offer, Dr.
Morgenstern.
Personal reasons.
You do realize, don't you, you're a candidate for Chief Resident next year? I know I need to start presenting and publishing but now is not a very good time.
There is never a good time.
I just hate to see the personal overwhelm the job.
I'm not overwhelmed, and I'm doing my job.
Yes, but to build a career, you've got to take on more responsibility.
I've taken on plenty of responsibility.
So you'll have to forgive me if I don't stay after school these days to work for extra credit.
Where's Emergency? My wife and daughter were in an accident.
- Where's Emergency? - Over there.
Dr.
Connors, report to Station 7.
- Where is the ER? - This is the ER.
- Jennifer and Rachel Greene? - Sorry? I'm Mark Greene.
My wife and daughter have been in an accident.
- Just sent up to O.
R.
- What floor? Second.
Take the stairs.
It's faster.
Jen! Jen! I'm here.
I'm okay, Mark.
Rachel's okay.
Where's Rachel? Where's my daughter? - Probably in the waiting area.
- She's okay.
- I wanna stay with my wife.
- You can't right now.
- I'm a doctor.
- I'm Dr.
Shreiger.
- What are you, a Resident? - Yes.
I'll be working under Dr.
Musgrave.
- You can't be in here, Dr.
Greene.
- I'd like to talk to the Attending.
She has multiple injuries from being broadsided.
She's stable, but she's got a compound right tib-fib fracture.
- The films? - Abdominal CT showed free blood.
We're gonna do an exploratory laparotomy.
And we'll have an orthopod in to fix the fracture.
Have a seat in the waiting room.
Dr.
Musgrave will find you when we're through.
Susan! This came for you.
I had to sign for it.
Secret admirer? - Is it from Chloe? - The one and only.
Might as well open it.
These are $ 100 bills.
It's, like, 20 of them.
- Thirty of them, she says.
- Three thousand dollars? Are they marked in sequential? - What'd she write? - You read it.
"Ho, ho, ho, little Susie.
Aren't you surprised your mommy is so rich? Give this green stuff to Aunt Susie for helping out and doing so much for you.
Do you remember me? Loves and kisses, your crazy mom.
" - She must have been stoned.
- That's a holiday thing, you know.
Brings out the ghosts of deadbeat relatives.
I come from a long line of them.
I don't want her money.
My advice, you take what you can get and do not expect more.
Hey.
Hi.
- Daddy, Daddy! - Hi, how are you, baby? All right? - This is Craig, Daddy.
- Craig Simon.
This is my daughter, Amanda.
We were all in the accident.
- Hello.
- Hi.
We've spoken on the phone before.
Right, the appeals court.
The kids are fine.
Jennifer's got a bad break to her leg.
It's a.
Compound fracture, yeah.
I talked to the doctor.
We were going to a staff Christmas party.
A guy came out of nowhere.
Yeah, she's a terrible driver.
But I was driving.
Our car was squished, Daddy.
- Your head's all right? - Yeah.
It's nothing.
I wanna make sure that Jennifer's gonna be okay.
If it's all right with you, I think we'll stick around for a while.
Sure.
Randi! Randi! It's gonna be hard for people to see through that.
- They can walk around.
- I'm out of here.
If you hear anything about Mark, will you call my machine? Bad news for Joshua.
St.
Joe's, Lacey Street, Carnegie House.
All the residential homes have a wait list of 600 years.
It's too late anyway.
He left an hour ago.
- He's too sick to be out there.
- He's not sick enough to stay in here.
Maybe I'm not cut out for this.
In Rehab, I feel like I'm giving the patients something.
- We give them something.
- A Band-Aid -and send them back to the front.
- Treat them and street them.
We do the best we can.
And when that's not good enough? Most days it has to be.
You're familiar with endarterectomy for the prevention of stroke? I've done some reading.
And you also know that symptomatic patients with stenotic lesions do better with surgery than with medical care alone.
- Not all studies agree.
- True.
When do doctors ever agree? You're familiar with the CASANOVA trials? Carotid artery stenosis with asymptomatic narrowing.
- Operation versus aspirin.
- Right.
And what did they find? No benefit from endarterectomy.
Well, I'm about to prove them wrong.
I really wasn't planning on hiring third-years for my studies.
- They don't have the skills.
- I've got the skills.
Really? You're arrogant as hell.
I like that.
Let's see those skills, doctor.
Scrub in.
Jennifer Greene? - I'm her husband, Dr.
Mark Greene.
- Doctor, I'm Dr.
Musgrave.
- Everything went well.
- Thank God.
I took a look at the spleen.
No rupture.
No lacerations.
Ortho did an internal fixation of a fracture of the right tib-fib.
No complications.
You can see her soon.
- How long the screws gonna stay in? - About six months.
You can hold on to it.
It's a copy.
Thank you.
Do you wanna translate for me? Hey.
How are you? Let me look at you.
Still ugly as sin.
Let's get a drink.
So, what about this fancy dinner? Something wrong? Can't I just take you to a nice restaurant? I would've thrown something together at home.
Mom, just let me do this.
- Well, suit yourself.
- Thank you.
What do you want? Champagne cocktail.
Mot, please.
I'll have a Manhattan, straight up.
Thanks.
So how's my famous son doing? I'm still fixing kids for a living.
How's Howard? I never see him.
Year-end tax deadline.
I'm a CPA widow.
What can I say? Have you heard from anyone? Besides the Tribune calling about you? - Anyone else? - What's up, Douglas? Nothing is up.
Now, don't even start.
I know you.
Dad called.
What does he want? He saw me on TV, and he just wanted to touch base.
So, what did you say? I told him to get lost.
- He wants money.
- He's not gonna get any money, so.
Does he think he can just waltz into our lives any damn time he wants to? I didn't tell you this to upset you.
- He's up to something, Doug.
- Just forget about him.
Hey, he can't touch us ever again.
Hi, Josh.
- How are you doing? - Why do you ask that? It's beautiful.
They destroyed this in nineteen seventy-something.
We're gonna go and rebuild, side part.
Look, you forgot these.
Thank you very much.
We've been expecting these in.
Is there anything else you need? We can always use-- If you have pencils.
Good night, Josh.
Try and stay warm, okay? - What did she say? - She said, "Okay, hon.
Let's go home.
" The beauty of codependency.
Hey.
Hi.
Jeanie and I are just drowning our bad day.
Over root beer.
- How was surgery? - Slow.
I held a clamp.
- Sorry about tonight.
- Did you guys have a date? A date? During med school? What, are you kidding? - How many more years? - Counting the Air Force? Air Force? She felt like she needed a little more direction in her life.
Did a lot of drugs.
Didn't do well in high school.
- Fifteenth in a class of 2000.
- Could have done better.
And in college I knew I wanted more.
- Be a fighter pilot.
- And a doctor.
So one semester-- This really good-Iooking recruiter comes by-- And I signed up.
You have been listening? - Yeah, I've been listening.
- They're paying for med school and after residency, I give them four years of service.
My husband thought I was an overachiever.
She hasn't even gotten to the astronaut part.
Sorry.
Ride's over.
- Forgot my soap.
- Hi, Mrs.
Bassett.
Your baby's getting so big.
Oh, well, actually she's.
Oh, and beautiful.
Just like your mama.
- Thank you.
- She's really cute.
Yes, you are.
- Good night.
- Good night.
I used to love this.
There better not be anybody behind this wall.
Watch out! Fireplace? It's beautiful.
- How did you know about this? - I met an architect today.
He knew about my house.
An architect? Dance with me.
To this? Oh, you don't know how? Okay.
Now you've gone too far.
Hi, baby.
Mark.
I spoke with the doctor.
Everything went really well.
- Rachel? - She's fine.
In the waiting room.
Is Craig still here? Yeah, he is.
Oh, Mark.
I know.
We don't have to talk now.
When you come home.
I didn't wanna tell you before Christmas.
I know.
I know, Jen.
You fell in love with him? I didn't mean to.