ER Episode Scripts

s02e21

I didn't wanna give up fighting for her.
I'd go on forever.
I mean, little Susie's almost a year old.
She's been with me forever.
Her birthday's next week.
Did I mention that? She fell in love with our neighbors little puppy, JoBo.
So I got her this stuffed little animal, black and white, floppy ears.
Did I tell you the daycare center called? Seems I still have an outstanding bill.
Gotta love that whole insult-to-injury thing.
I kind of hate going up there, but.
It's Susie's birthday next week.
Did I mention that? I've got to remember to send her a present.
Anyway, I suppose things are okay.
Don 't have to get up twice a night, so at least I'm getting some more sleep.
Just going to work, coming home, sticking to a routine.
I guess life's getting back to normal.
Before the baby, that is.
Ma'am? - Hello.
- Hi.
I'm Father Ruiz-Anchia.
Can I help you? Yeah.
The lady that just sat down there, she dropped this outside.
Last week it was her keys.
Once she even stepped out of her shoe.
Didn't even realize it.
- Thank you.
I'll give it to her.
- Okay.
It's beautiful, isn't it? They're rehearsing for a christening tomorrow.
"Salve Mater Misericordia.
" It's based on the sequence "Salve Mater Salvatoris" by Adam of Saint Victor.
No one knows who did the translation.
Is there anything else I can do for you? Hello.
Can I help you? I don't know.
I don't know.
Turfed the chest pain to Cardiology, the chronic puker to Medicine.
I love these things.
My daughter, she left them after her last visit.
Bipolar to Psych, and say goodbye to Mr.
Barry.
The one who called you an incompetent poser? That was before his horrifying rectal revealed a horrifying case of hemorrhoids.
Sent him to the surgery clinic.
Carter's with that otitis media.
Ross isn't on yet.
Lewis is late.
She worked an extra four hours last night.
She's not due for another hour.
- You want her to be late.
- Don't be ridiculous.
"Her tardiness makes her a problematic candidate for Chief Resident"? Mark, I can't believe you think I'd keep tabs on anyone.
You're late, Jerry.
Time out.
What do you see? Oh, come on.
Al and I are engaged.
- Oh, yeah, it's gorgeous.
- Congratulations.
And the rest of the good news is paramedics are on their way in.
Some "failure to fly" suicide attempt.
GCS-3.
- Lf he's gorked, why bring him here? - Landed in the lake, which is still chilly.
- Warm him up, then pronounce him.
- Well, they can't be cold and dead.
I thought we were gonna do something fun.
- I'm having fun.
- Yeah.
Is this what you and Dad used to do every morning? If it makes you feel any better, Dad couldn't keep up if he were driving.
You're the first woman I've jogged for.
- Doug, I'm so flattered.
- Yeah.
Remind me to reward you when we go back.
Let's go back.
Come on.
Wait.
Hang on, I got you.
- My knee, my knee, my knee.
- Okay, hang on.
What, this one? - It goes out on me all the time.
- I'm a doctor, you know.
- Yeah, a pediatrician.
- Yeah, you complaining? - Not necessarily.
- Here you go.
Like this.
Is this helping at all? - Yeah? - Yeah.
I really am sorry.
I'm not saying that she-- The individual in question isn't a possible candidate for chief resident.
- Just not a probable candidate.
- Not saying that.
been down 45 minutes.
Jumped off a 75-foot crane, right into the lake.
On my count.
One, two, three.
Last epi? - Four minutes.
- I'm only saying that this candidate has had some serious personal difficulties of late.
Which were handled quite well, considering all things.
- Gave two atropine in the field.
- Pupils fixed and dilated.
I could consider supporting this individual if there were more supervision involved.
- No BP.
No pulse.
- By the new ER Attending -Morgenstern wants to bring in? - It's a possibility.
- And the candidates for that job are? - I think it's still pretty wide open.
- It's warmed up.
- He's dead.
So whoever I support for that position will support my choice for chief? - It's possible.
- Mark, excuse me.
Whenever you're done talking in code about Dr.
Lewis being Chief Resident and Dr.
Weaver becoming Attending, can we call the time of death? - Yeah, sure.
Time of death: 8:53.
- Let me know when the family gets here.
And call the Eye Bank.
Girl, that's pretty.
Finally popped the question, huh? Yep.
He really wanted me to have his mother's ring, but she's still alive.
- Oh, Susan.
Hi.
- Hi.
Where is everyone? Field trip to the park.
Spring at last, thank God.
Well, I have a bill to pay.
Well, listen.
Would you mind stopping back? They're holding the bus for me.
Of course we get there, and no one's there but an OB nurse.
And Chloe is screaming for The Beatles, "The White Album! " Carter's fumbling, can't find it anywhere.
Chloe doesn't want to breathe, but she thinks singing will help.
So there we are, like a bunch of crazies.
And there I am, in between verses, telling her: "Push, Chloe! Push! Come on.
You can do it, girl.
You can do it! " And I cut the cord and wrapped the little, warm baby all up and put it on her chest.
Oh, this brand-new life.
Chloe was crying.
I was crying.
She was so beautiful.
Our baby girl.
I told her: "You did it, Chloe.
You really did it.
" And you know what she said? She said, "No, we did it.
We did it.
" Our baby girl.
I did send the check in.
- I wouldn't say it were in the mail-- - Get off the phone.
Clear Curtain Area 3.
- Clear Curtain Area 3.
- You got it.
Okay, come on.
Don't play with that! That's really expensive, Jimmy.
- Give me back your gun.
- I was playing with that.
Annie, Jimmy, I'll take you inside.
- No, I want to stay with my mom.
- Take your brother and go with Lydia.
- Gently, here we go.
- Dr.
Greene, I don't feel well.
We've got you, Loretta.
We've got you.
Gently.
Gently.
We've got you.
- Sorry, I didn't mean to scare you.
- No, you didn't.
Not really.
- We couldn't be out of penicillin, right? - They moved the antibiotics down there.
This is adorable.
Yeah, I had to clear out some of Susie's stuff from upstairs at daycare.
Susan, if there's anything I can do, if you want to talk about anything-- You were right, here it is.
Thanks.
I'm with Pickman.
- I know.
Shep's off today.
- I'd be with Pickman even if he wasn't.
You shouldn't have filed that complaint with IAD.
- He shouldn't have slammed that kid.
- It's not what happened.
- You think he was just doing his job? - Yes, I do.
I believe the job doesn't have to be done that way.
- Who made you the voice of experience? - Raul.
That's who.
Look, I'm sorry.
I didn't mean that.
You know, Shep's been working at this job for almost eight years.
If you ever step off that high moral ground, you might learn something.
- Yeah, I already have.
- You should tell the IAD investigator.
I already have.
- Abdominal pain for how long? - A couple of days.
I feel so bloated.
It doesn't go away.
- Any vomiting? - Yeah.
Could I be--? Could I be dehydrated again? We'll get some fluids in you just in case.
D-5.
Half at 150 an hour.
- CBC, lytes, chest and abdominal series.
- Coming up.
I couldn't even get the kids to school.
They shouldn't be in here.
Don't worry.
Jerry's probably showing them educational pictures of open-heart surgery or something worse.
- I'll check back when the tests are back.
- Okay.
- Hey, there you are.
- Hi, how'd it go? Man, that guy was a real son of a bitch.
It's an interview, not a military inquest.
Yeah, but he asked 1000 questions.
He already talked to Reilly.
- I know.
- Little peckerhead.
- He hasn't seen half what I've seen.
- Calm down, it'll be fine.
You'll tell them you were there the whole time? You saw everything? Yes, I was there.
The guy stumbled into the table.
That simple.
Anyone could see it was kind of a tough situation.
Shep, you're driving me crazy.
I'm gonna speak to this investigator guy and this whole thing's gonna go away.
Will you please go away? It's my day off.
I don't really have anything else to do.
Well, it's spring, you know? Plant flowers.
Drive some golf balls.
- I don't play golf.
- Start.
Annie, will you stop? Just-- - You want me to call the cops? - Don't laugh.
Al's on the way.
By the way.
Congratulations.
We just got into town, practicing for a basketball tournament on Saturday.
I talked to her mom, said she was operated on when she was 8 weeks old.
- Something called a Kasai procedure.
- Carter.
Hepatoportoenterostomy.
Done for liver failure from bile duct obstruction.
Okay, up and in.
I can do it myself, thank you.
TC's dedicated.
I finally knew something was wrong when she didn't wanna play.
I need to be fixed now, okay? Because I have a tournament on Saturday, and it's very important.
My son's in a Pee Wee tournament next week.
- Pee Wee stops at 8.
I'm 10.
- Sit up.
- Fever's 101.
- How long has she been jaundiced? We've got a lot of kids.
I didn't really notice.
Dr.
Ross, can I speak to you for a minute? Yeah.
Her folks live in Penrose.
Penrose? Like 150 miles from here? - Yeah, soybean country.
- Yeah.
They're on their way, but I've got all these other kids at the motel and God knows what damage they're doing.
I imagine TC's gonna have to be admitted.
In the meantime, we'll keep an eye on her.
All right.
Thanks.
Come with me.
You're gonna be okay.
Cats! Burmese, Cornish Rex, Japanese Bobtail.
God, my hatred for them knows no bounds.
- Short hair, long hair, I hate them.
- I think you're allergic to them.
I never used to be.
My brother had a cat growing up, and I hated.
Sometimes your allergies get worse when you get older.
Or maybe that's completely false.
I'm shooting the Chicago Cat Show, and suddenly I'm Tippi Hedren in The Birds.
They're everywhere! Iris.
Iris.
Iris, stop.
Okay, we're just gonna get you your own room.
Russian Blue, Himalaya, Egyptian Mau, Bengal, Balinese Burmese, Cornish Rex, Japanese Bobtail.
Please, somebody help me.
It's my baby.
- Clear Trauma 1.
- What happened? She was in her crib.
She doesn't cry.
I can't wake her up.
- How old is she? - Six months.
Her name's Grace.
She's not breathing and she's cyanotic.
- What is wrong with her? - Pediatric intubation tray.
-4.
0 ET tube.
- Heart rate's only 40.
- Has she been sick, Mrs? - Ramsey.
Judith Ramsey.
A little vomiting.
Just getting over the flu.
- Any fever or seizures? - Temp's normal.
She was jerking.
I couldn't get her to stop.
- I need a 3.
5, not a 4.
0.
- Use a 4.
0.
Susan, I'll do it.
Please, just tell me what is wrong with her.
You have to wait outside so we can take care of Grace.
- I don't wanna leave.
- Susan, take her to the Waiting Room.
- No.
Please.
- Susan, now! normal saline, CBC, Chem-7 heel-stick glucose.
Get a head CT, and we may need an LP.
Come on.
Let me see.
Let me see.
- Think she'll be able to play? - I doubt it.
Let me know when the LFTs, BUN and creatinine are back.
And, Carter, she's in here alone, so stay close.
Okay.
Yuck.
What are you kids doing in the hall? Why is it that Chloe always called Mom "Cookie" and I always called Mom "Mom"? She was such a great kid that way.
Funny and fearless.
Just one big party all wrapped up and.
We'd dress up and put on these plays at the top of the stairs.
Chloe, of course, went straight for Mom's best dresses, best jewelry best shoes.
I was afraid they'd get mad, so I was the one in the bathrobe and sneakers.
But they never did.
Never.
Not once.
Chloe went for the good stuff, and I went for being the good girl.
She was such an accomplished adult by the time she was 9.
And so lousy at it by the time she was 19.
I mean, if she could just go back to some of that then if she wanted to be a mother.
What am I saying? She is a mother.
Boy, when you buy somebody lunch, you go all out.
How's your knee? If it's still bothering you, I can get you something for that.
- I heard from Ray.
- Oh, yeah.
Well, not from him actually.
About him.
- How's the good life in the Caymans? - He never went there.
He's in Mexico.
Kind of sends a message, doesn't it? Like what? Like he's not coming back? Well, what does it look like to you? Well, I'm used to him disappearing.
He doesn't tend to mention it in advance.
Yeah, I guess not, considering he took my money with him.
Well.
- Thanks for all the sympathy.
- No I'm sorry.
It's just, I'm disappointed.
Well, don't be.
It wasn't your money.
He bolted on me year after year.
But I just didn't think with you in the picture.
- What's that got to do with it? - I'd think he would want to see you.
Come back and see me.
Come back, see us.
Is that what you mean? He doesn't know about us, Karen.
Well, maybe it's your idea of fun, to watch him find out.
Is that what this is about, Doug? What we're about? Getting back at Dad, stealing his girlfriend? - That's ridiculous.
- Is it? For three weeks, you've been telling me how you can't stand the guy.
Now you're disappointed he's not coming back? That is ridiculous.
My motto is: "Think Jordan.
" I'm just saying that you can't rule out Orlando.
What do they know about basketball in Florida? - Does this hurt? - Yeah, a little.
TC's right.
Orlando's got a good record.
Push comes to shove, they'll choke.
Only one NBA leader in scoring and zip in rebounds.
Okay, I give up.
- Carter.
- Liver's enlarged and firm upon examination.
Lab tests show elevated LFTs, leukocytosis, and a prolonged PT consistent with ascending cholangitis.
Start her on one gram of cefotaxime IV Q-6.
- She on the list for a liver transplant? - Status 3.
Move her up to Status 2.
She'll have to stay hospitalized until we find a liver.
I better brush up on my basketball trivia.
You should do that anyway.
- Dr.
Benton? Al Boulet.
- How are you doing? I got some kind of flu or something.
Yeah? Well, take care.
Sorry about those kids and the camera.
I'm glad I got it back.
I'm sorry about snorting all over your hand.
That's just another adventure.
Speaking of which, I was thinking maybe.
- Bless you.
- Thank you.
- Who are you? - Lily.
- Where do you come from? - The bus stop.
What's wrong? - I can't get him off.
- Is that a hermit crab? Herman.
My dad named him.
I'm afraid we're gonna have to cut him off.
But he'd die, right? I can't kill Herman.
No, of course you can't.
Cats you can kill.
But not Herman.
It's just water, honey.
There you go.
- Thank you.
- You're welcome.
I produced this cheesy Jacques Cousteau rip-off thing a couple of months ago.
- Anything on Grace Ramsey? - She's breathing spontaneously.
- We're waiting on the CT.
- Okay, let me know.
- They're seriously backed up up there.
- Just let me know.
- Hi.
I'm Dr.
Weaver.
- Hi.
- Your name's Al Boulet? - Yeah.
We've got a Jeanie Boulet here.
Any relation? She's my wife.
Actually, we're separated.
You've been losing weight, having fevers, sweating? Yeah, I think I've got the 24-day flu instead of the 24-hour.
A lot of stuff's been going around at work.
Deep breath.
Your shortness of breath, how long's that been going on? About a month or so.
Mr.
Boulet, I'm gonna get a chest x-ray and I'll talk to you about some blood tests I'd like to order.
- Seen Dr.
Greene? - He snuck out for some lunch.
Radiology screwed up the films on Loretta Sweet.
We have to redo them.
- What happened? Are you okay? - Yeah.
I'm fine.
Teach this SOB to grapple with a soon-to-be-married man.
Let's pour a little cold peroxide on those cuts.
- You don't look so good.
- Don't worry.
Nothing will to ruin -our celebration at the Ritz-Carlton.
- Let's clean you up.
Hey, Jeanie.
- I didn't know you were here.
- Yeah.
I'm just getting a little checkup.
- What's wrong? - Nothing really.
Just a little tired lately.
Breath feels kind of short or something.
- Working too much, that's all.
- Did they say anything? No.
They just took a bunch of blood, did some x-rays.
- Look, I've got some other patients.
- Don't worry about it.
Go do your thing.
- They've got me in good hands.
- I'll try and stop by later.
Hi, this is Jeanie down in the ER.
We've been waiting on some lab tests forever.
Boulet.
Al Boulet.
Yeah.
If you could put a rush on them, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks.
- Carol Hathaway? - Yes.
Sorry to keep you waiting.
I'm David Haskell from IAD.
- That's Investigations and-- - Audit Division, yes, I know.
- Sorry to have kept you waiting.
- You said that.
Must have really meant it then.
So you saw Ahn stumble.
- Who? - Ahn Nguyen.
Vietnamese boy.
- Saw him hit his head on a coffee table? - That's right.
- Just lost his balance? - Must have.
Which would make sense, after Mr.
Shepard gave him-- What did he call it? "A light shove.
" Is that how you'd describe it? Light shove? Well, the kid wasn't falling very fast.
So, yeah, it was probably pretty light.
Mr.
Brown says you helped him unstrap a board.
He was nervous and frustrated, so I helped him do it.
Then you both took the board back into the kitchen.
No, Reilly took it.
That's right.
He says he was headed to the kitchen with the board.
That's when he saw Mr.
Shepard-- "Slam" is the word he used.
Slam Ahn Nguyen across the room.
So you must have gone back into the kitchen at pretty much the same time.
No, Reilly moved in first.
He carried the board ahead of me.
But if you both saw the incident, which obviously you did since you think it was a light shove, and Mr.
Brown thinks it was a slam then both of you had to be there the whole time.
Yes, that's right.
I was there the whole time.
No, we had a fight, and I feel like a jerk.
My dad did take her money, and I wasn't all that sympathetic.
She was accusing me of wanting him to come back.
- What is this all about? - I don't know.
- What kind of question is that? - It's not your fault he stole her money.
- Except that he gave the money to me.
- So give it back.
I can't.
I only have $ 10,000.
I gave This is way too complicated for me.
Kerry, the CT's are back.
Subdural hematoma, loud and clear.
You found retinal hemorrhages and didn't bother to tell me.
You were already upset about the intubation.
This mother's abusing her child.
I want to talk to her.
- Not yet.
- Not yet? A subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages are the hallmarks of Shaken Baby Syndrome.
She could have brain damage! - I've ordered a Neurosurgical consult.
- I wanna talk to the mother.
- She's the problem! - I called Children and Family Services.
They have 1000 cases.
Who keeps tabs? I've also notified the police.
It's the best we can do.
You know that if this mother doesn't get it and that baby starts crying she picks her up and the baby doesn't stop she's just going to start shaking her and shaking her! We can't solve this, Susan.
I wish we could, but we both know we can't.
So we're gonna take care of the child, okay? We're gonna do everything we can for the child.
They took the baby up to Pediatrics ICU.
Children and Family Services came down to talk to the mother.
The police are looking into it.
And that's the last I know.
That's the last I'm gonna know.
Sometimes that's the good thing about being an ER doc.
Treat them and street them.
Turf them upstairs.
I've gotta hand it to that Kerry Weaver, though.
She surprises you.
Just when you think she's completely clueless she hangs in there.
Stalling, arguing with me, agreeing with me-- "We can't solve the problem.
We can take care of the child.
" Until I finally let go.
Getting bored sitting in your room? Hey, your fever's down.
Come on, bounce me one.
The good news is that once you get a new liver the disease won't come back.
And you're official now.
You're all signed up on the transplant list.
We don't need it right away.
If it takes a few months, you're still gonna be fine.
Unfortunately, you're gonna have to stay here.
Well, not here.
You're gonna be upstairs.
But I'll come visit you, whenever I can.
And you can educate me on the finer points of the point guard.
Maybe we can watch the playoffs together.
That sounds pretty cool, doesn't it? But I can't play in my tournament, can I? No.
No, I'm sorry, TC.
You can't play in your tournament.
Thought I'd never get out of there.
I'm glad you didn't wait.
Tuna on whole wheat with lettuce and tomato.
You want it? I'm not hungry.
Right after I finish my cheese steak.
I know I've said this before, but you have to get Kerry Weaver off my back.
- What? - Six-month-old baby girl came in cyanotic.
Kerry thinks I can't do the intubation.
- But you did? - No! She took over.
Yes, it was a baby.
Yes, it was hard.
But I've done this 100 times.
How's everything else? You mean therapy? That is what you mean, right? Well, do I feel terrific? Not really.
Am I marginally better? Not really.
Am I happy I'm spending my money on therapy and not Gymboree or a stroller? Not really.
So everything's going okay.
- Want to walk back? - They didn't page me.
I wish there was something I could do.
Something I could say.
So do I.
It would be so much easier if this bad news were happening to some patient.
I shouldn't be drinking this.
I'll never get to sleep.
I never sleep anyway.
Yeah.
You know, we actually had a class in medical school.
A sort of "How to deliver the bad news.
" We even had to make videotapes and perform it.
"I'm very sorry, sir, but your wife was hit by a Mack truck and we did everything possible, but she died.
" Then some actor playing the husband would go into convulsions on the floor and start crying out in agony.
That's not usually how they react.
They shake.
Then they start to cry.
Yeah.
I remember the first time I had to do it.
It was this elderly man.
And his wife had just died.
No big accident, just old age.
And he looked at me for about a minute.
And then walked away.
Yeah.
I was the one left shaking.
Practice makes perfect, though.
Now I can deliver that speech in a heartbeat.
And it's not that I don't feel badly, because I do.
But I get the words out, and I move on.
The healers are always taught to move on.
And for the life of me, I can't seem to do that now.
This hurt is so strong and so present, it makes me feel her.
And to still be able to feel her.
I don't want to move on from that.
- You need something? - Your interview must have gone well.
Got a lot of work, Reilly.
Haskell called.
They dropped the investigation.
It seems your answers confirmed Shep's side of the story.
Well, now we can all get back to work.
I like you.
But whatever you said in there I don't think you're doing Shep any favors.
Maybe it's the Raul thing and he'll come through this but right now, he doesn't belong out there.
He's dangerous.
I can't keep doing this.
You can.
You made it through the last surgery, you can make it through this.
It's the kids.
They never know what's going on from one day to the next.
Where I'm gonna be, where they're gonna be.
They're gonna be at my house tonight, okay? My parental skills can use a little brushing up.
I don't know what to tell them.
I don't know what to say.
I've hardly even seen them all day.
Well, I can tell you one thing.
They've been pretty busy.
Take a look.
Look, Mom, they turned us into doctors.
Officer, I'm so sorry.
Are you kidding? He was the center of attention.
He loved it.
Are you sure you can't stay for dinner? Mom, look.
Thank you, but I can't eat dinner at 5:30 in the afternoon.
Pathetic, isn't it? How Howard comes back from the office grabs dinner, rushes back to the office.
I thought tax season was over.
What happened to April 15th? Does the word "extension" mean anything to you? As a matter of fact, I think I have one of those.
- All right.
Listen, Mom.
- So how much do you need? You can't possibly know that.
I haven't said anything about money.
- You're not here for dinner, are you? - No.
- You don't drop by a lot to play bridge.
- I don't play bridge.
My point exactly.
Doug, there are three reasons kids come back home.
One, to announce they're getting married.
Two, they're depressed and they need a place to sleep for three years.
And three, they need money.
My money's on the money.
So were you always so smart? Right up until the day I married your father.
Doug.
All those years you were growing up, not knowing about your dad I couldn't help you then.
Nothing would make me happier than to help you now.
Don't you wanna know what I need the money for? You really wanna tell me? - Bring the carrots over here.
- Okay.
- Broken tib-fib.
- Jeanie, do you have a minute? If I call Ortho now, they ought to make it down by summer.
- It's about Al, isn't it? - Yeah.
- And is it AIDS? - Yeah.
Pneumocystis pneumonia.
I saw his chart, and when he told me how he was feeling, his symptoms.
I need to give him the news.
I thought it might be easier for him-- No, I'll do it.
I'll do it.
I know you're separated.
But he may have been HIV-positive for a few years.
Have you ever been tested? How many married people get tested? I checked for you at the hotel suite.
It doesn't seem to be mine anymore.
Something about when you lose company money.
You're gonna have to let me write you something for that.
Whatever.
I've gotta say, I much prefer your place.
Whatever.
Some of what you said, I don't know if it's true or not.
But you made me think about it.
And I.
I don't know.
I realized that I want to be with you, Karen.
You don't see me kicking you out the door.
You're gonna have to let me do this because I have a very low threshold for your pain.
Up, and there you go.
- Karen.
- Doug? - I have a confession to make.
- You're not married, are you? - No, it's worse than that.
- Okay.
You know the money that my father took from you? He gave it to me.
- What? - Yeah, l-- I mean, he never gave me a dime when I was in medical school and he just handed me a bunch of cash before he took off.
Twenty-five thousand dollars.
Yeah.
I want you to have it.
Twenty-five thousand dollars? Ray stole over 250 grand.
- Two hundred and fifty grand? - You got it.
This is nothing.
- This is a drop in the bucket.
- No, it's everything.
It's the sweetest thing anybody's ever done for me.
I could get fired tomorrow, but I gotta love you for this one.
Great news, huh, baby? They dropped the whole thing! Whatever you said in there made the difference.
We are home free.
Let's celebrate.
Let's go do something.
- Shep, I got a lot of paperwork.
- You can do this later.
This can wait.
No, I really need to do this now.
Okay, we go to dinner, then.
Dinner, maybe a club.
No.
They're playing basketball outside.
I'll join you when I'm finished.
Okay.
Don't be too long.
Al, I need to talk to you.
It's cold in here tonight.
Maybe Chloe is getting it together.
Or maybe Joe can keep it together.
Sometimes I dream that they call and say: "Hey, Suze, why don't you take her again for a while?" And in my dream I say, "Yes, Chloe.
I will take her forever.
" Then I wake up, and I know it's not true because my arms hurt from feeling so empty.
I always knew you loved your children.
I just never realized how much you fell in love with them.
Little Susie was like a storybook.
One you never wanted to put down.
Every smile was some new page to be pored over.
Studied.
Touched.
Remembered.
I loved my storybook.
For the first time in a long time I didn 't feel alone.