Anne (2017) s01e01 Episode Script

Your Will Shall Decide Your Destiny

1 [soft music] [percussive music] [grunting] Yah! [train whistle blowing] First thing we climb a tree And maybe then we'd talk Or sit silently And listen to our thoughts With illusions of someday Casting a golden light No dress rehearsal This is our life You are ahead by a century You are ahead by a century [soft music] You'll want to hurry and eat if you're to meet the train on time.
[sighing] I pray this isn't foolishness but it's too late now.
We made a practical decision; we'll just have to hope for the best.
With any luck, Mrs.
Spencer will have picked out a good one; a hard worker and obedient like we asked for.
I couldn't tolerate a lazy boy or a sullen boy.
No, I couldn't abide it and I wouldn't.
In spite of all the worry, I'm relieved to know that you'll have a regular hand about the place.
You can't buy loyalty.
You coming in sometime today? Matthew Cuthbert, you must be in a state.
Since when do you sit at the table without washing your hands? Let's not forget you were the one convinced of this plan.
You've been set on it since winter, so there's no point fretting now.
Not that I disagree, because I don't.
Will you be ready to set off as soon as you're finished here? I will.
You can bet it won't take long for Rachel to come a-knocking.
Lord knows she's got a hunger for gossip like a person starved.
[soft music] [soft music] [baby crying] [baby crying] I told you to have their supper on the table a half hour ago.
She needs her diaper changed, Mrs.
Hammond.
The stew is almost ready.
- Did you milk the cow? - No.
Not yet, but I Give her to me! You want these children to starve to death? Do something right for a change! You're more trouble than you're worth.
Nothing but a miserable piece of trash! [exclaiming] Hurry up! We'll see what Mr.
Hammond has to say about this when he gets home.
[barking] Are you quite all right, dear? I like imagining better than remembering.
Why are the worst memories the most insistent? I wouldn't know.
Try to rest.
"If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, but your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.
" I love Jane Eyre, don't you? - I never met her.
- I'm glad you've woken.
I have so many more questions for you about Green Gables.
I'm sure you do.
Why do you suppose neither of the Cuthberts ever married? Did either of them have a tragical romance? - It's none of our business.
- But I'm bursting with curiosity! Uh Shhh.
[train whistle blowing] [soft music] [bird peeping] [birdsong] - [background chatter] - Whoa.
Whoa, whoa, whoa.
Afternoon.
Sir.
I wonder if you can help me.
Is there a Little girl? You didn't see her? She's just outside.
Wouldn't come in.
Darndest thing.
- But - Said she preferred to sit outside, because there was What was it now? "More scope for the imagination.
" That was it.
She's a case, I should say.
I heard her talkin' to herself out there.
But I'm not expecting a girl.
It's a boy that I have come for.
Mrs.
Spencer was to bring him over from the asylum for us.
Mrs.
Spencer got off the train with that strange snippet, gave her over to my charge.
Said you'd be along for her presently.
Well, that's all I know about it.
I haven't got any more orphans concealed hereabouts.
I, uh I don't understand.
Well, I'm sure the girl will be only too happy to tell you every little detail of what happened.
She's got a tongue of her own, that's for certain.
[chuckling] Good day to you.
I suppose you are Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables? I'm very glad to see you.
I was beginning to be afraid that you weren't coming and I was imagining all the things that might have happened to prevent you.
I'd made up my mind that if you didn't come for me, I'd go down the tracks to that big wild cherry tree and climb up into it and stay all night.
I wouldn't be a bit afraid, and it would be lovely to sleep in a tree all white with bloom in the moonshine, don't you think? I can also imagine that I'm already a disappointment to you.
I'm aware that I'm not much to look at, but even though I'm thin, I'm very strong.
I want you to know that I'm forever grateful that you're adopting me.
You're a sight for sore eyes, Mr.
Cuthbert.
You best come along.
Uh - ahem - I'll take your bag.
Oh, I can carry it.
It isn't heavy.
I've got all my worldly goods in it, but it isn't heavy.
And if it isn't carried a certain way, it falls right open, so I better keep it.
I've come to know the exact knack of it.
I am ecstatic beyond measure that I'm going to belong to you and your sister.
Ecstatic! I've never belonged to anybody before.
I mean, you and your sister are practically the stuff of fiction.
Two hard-working, decent people, lonely all their lives in their silent house, longing for the love of a child.
And I will strive to be just the best daughter that anybody could ever have.
I'm sure that I can do it.
To be honest, I haven't had much experience at it.
I'm not usually brought into a house to be a daughter, so you can well imagine what a blessing this is and how much my heart is lifted.
And I've given it a lot of thought, and I am determined that I shall be obedient, and dutiful and yet lively enough so as to lighten up the place after you've lived for so many years without the delights of a happy child and the scope of her imagination.
Have you always wanted a daughter? Always in your heart of hearts? I read once that "a daughter is a little girl" who grows up to be a friend.
" And it gives my heart a thrill to even say it aloud.
Oh, isn't she lovely? - What's her name? - Uh that's, uh the mare.
She doesn't have a name? But the right name is so important.
She looks to me like her name is Belle.
Hello, Belle.
You are a beauty, and I am sure we'll be great friends.
- Mare.
- [clucking] Bye, tree! That cherry tree is my first friend here on the Island.
What did that cherry tree, all white and lacy, make you think of? Well, now, um, I dunno.
Why, a bride, of course! A bride all in white with a misty veil.
I've never seen one, but I imagine what she would look like.
I never expect to be a bride myself.
I'm so homely, nobody would ever want to marry me.
Unless he was a foreign missionary.
I suppose a foreign missionary mightn't be very particular.
But I do hope someday I shall have a white dress, with beautiful puff sleeves.
That is my highest ideal of earthly bliss.
Am I talking too much? People are always telling me that I do, and it seems to cause no end of aggravation.
Would you rather I didn't talk? If you say so, I'll stop.
I can stop when I make up my mind to it, although it's difficult.
I don't mind.
I'm so glad.
I know you and I are going to get along together just fine.
It's such a relief to talk when one wants to and not be told that children should be seen and not heard.
I've had that said to me a million times if I have once.
People would laugh at me because I use big words.
But they're exciting and descriptive words, like like "enraptured" and "glorious"! If you have big ideas, you have to use big words to express them, haven't you? Well, uh I suppose so.
For example: I am enraptured by this glorious landscape! Careful now.
Careful.
[knocking] Afternoon, Rachel.
I've put the kettle on.
Won't you sit down? I don't want to interrupt if you're expecting company.
Oh, we've got plenty of time.
Matthew won't be back for several hours.
I took quite a fright when I saw Matthew starting off today.
- I can imagine.
- Well I couldn't imagine what might cause him to leave his crop in the middle of the afternoon.
I was fearful he'd gone to call for the doctor.
- Oh, I'm quite well.
- Oh! What a relief.
Oh, my, my, my.
[sighing] Of course, now that I have time to think, it wouldn't make sense for Matthew to take the time to put on his best set of clothes had there been an emergency.
No it wouldn't.
No indeed.
Oh, for heaven's sake, Marilla.
Matthew's gone to the train station at Bright River.
Ah.
Well, well.
Bright River.
He's fetching a hired hand.
Yes and no.
We're adopting a boy from the orphan asylum in Nova Scotia, and he's arriving today.
Matthew's gone to fetch him.
Marilla Cuthbert, if you had told me that Matthew was meeting a kangaroo from Australia, I couldn't be more surprised.
An orphan boy?! What on earth put such a notion into your head? Because I'm gonna tell you plain: you're doing a mighty foolish thing a risky thing, that's what.
[soft music] [squawking] I cannot believe that I'm going to get to live somewhere so beautiful.
Dreams don't often come true, do they? But just now I feel pretty nearly perfectly happy.
Although I can't feel exactly perfectly happy, because, well what colour would you call this? It's red isn't it? Yes, it's red.
Now you see why I can't be perfectly happy.
Nobody could who has red hair.
It's my lifelong sorrow.
You don't know what you're getting.
You're letting a strange child into your house and you don't know a single thing about him! Why, only last week I was reading in the paper how a man and his wife up west of the Island took an orphan boy out of the asylum and he set fire to their home at night! Set it on purpose, Marilla! And they nearly burned to a crisp in their beds! Now, if you would've asked for my advice on this matter, - which you didn't do - Sugar? I would've told you, for mercy's sake, not to think of such a thing, that's what! I don't deny there's something in what you say, Rachel.
I've I've had some qualms myself.
How could you not? Matthew is getting on in years and his heart's been bothering him.
A boy will be a great help.
And it isn't as if he's coming from overseas or the States.
He's from Nova Scotia.
He can't be much different than ourselves.
Well, there is some comfort in that, knowing he's not some London street Arab or some French ruffian.
An orphan, Marilla? Matthew's been terrible set on it.
Well, I hope and pray it works all right.
Only, don't say I didn't warn you if he burns Green Gables down or puts strychnine in the well.
I heard of a case over in New Brunswick where an orphan-asylum child did just that, and the whole family died in fearful agonies.
Only, it was a girl in that instance.
Well, we're not getting a girl.
Oh, Mr.
Cuthbert! What do they call this place? The Avenue.
I suppose it is kind of pretty.
Pretty doesn't seem the right word to use, nor beautiful, either.
They don't go far enough.
It's wonderful.
Wonderful.
It's the first thing I ever saw that couldn't be improved upon by the imagination.
Other people may call it The Avenue, but I shall always call it the White Way of Delight.
[soft music] This here's Barry's Pond.
Oh, I don't like that name, either.
I shall call it let me see the Lake of Shining Waters.
Yes, that's the right name for it.
I know because of the thrill.
Do things ever give you a thrill? Well, I don't rightly know.
There has to be something.
Well, now, um I suppose it kind of gives me a thrill to see those ugly white grubs that spade up in the cucumber beds.
I suppose I can imagine that.
I hate the look of them.
I'd like to be rid of them.
I suppose I gave Mrs.
Hammond a thrill, then.
She was happy to be rid of me after her husband died.
Who's Mrs.
Hammond? I worked for her family, taking care of the children for a few years.
She had eight.
It sure seems to make some people angry when they have so many children.
Mr.
and Mrs.
Hammond were certainly vexed all the time.
[Mr.
Hammond]: Move, you little scarecrow! [Anne]: Please, please, I - This'll teach ya.
- [crying] [screaming] - Ah! - Mr.
Hammond?! - [barking] - [groaning] - Mrs.
Hammond!!! Mrs.
Hammond!!! - [groaning] - [panting] - [barking] [squawking] Is anything the matter? No.
Nothing.
I was startled by the geese, is all.
Don't you just love them? The geese? I do.
They're a very romantical species of bird.
Well, I wouldn't know about that.
Did you know they mate for life? They choose each other out of all the geese in the world, and they stay together until death do they part.
Well, now.
We're pretty near home.
Just another mile or so.
Home.
What a wonderful word.
Green Gables.
Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa.
I've pinched myself so many times today.
Every little while, this horrible, sickening feeling would come over me, and I'd be so afraid that this was all a dream.
But I just had to one more time.
This is real.
Green Gables is real and we're home.
- Mare.
- [clucking] [soft music] Matthew Cuthbert, who's that? Where is the boy? There wasn't any boy.
There was only her.
No boy? But there must've been a boy.
We sent word to Mrs.
Spencer to bring us a boy.
Well, she didn't.
She brought her.
I asked the stationmaster.
I had to bring her home.
She couldn't be left there, no matter where the mistake had come in.
Well, this is a pretty piece of business.
She's got to go back.
You don't want me.
I should've expected it.
I might've known nobody would really want me.
Oh, for heaven's sake, child, what are you doing on the ground? Now, you listen here and stand up.
- What do you make of this? - I, uh I figure she's traveled a long way to be disappointed.
Well, she shouldn't be here.
You should never have brought her home.
[distantly]: She's had a shock.
[distantly]: She's not the only one.
Enough of this foolishness.
[distantly]: Come along inside.
I'm speaking to you, child.
Little girl, that's enough now.
Little girl.
Little girl! Little girl? I wish I was anything but.
There's no point in crying.
There's been a mistake, is all.
We're not going to turn you out-of-doors tonight.
What is your name? What does it matter? I won't be here long enough for you to remember.
You will mind your manners and answer the question.
Please call me Cordelia.
Call you Cordelia? Is that your name? Or Penelope.
Penelope has a very tragical ring to it.
What is your name, child? Couldn't you call me either of those? My name is Anne.
Plain Anne.
Anne is a fine name.
A sensible name.
Could you please spell it with an E when you speak it? Anne with an E looks much more distinguished.
Very well, then, Anne with an E, it's time to come inside.
Get yourself up now.
[birdsong] I knew it.
This is a lovely home.
Why didn't you tell me at the train station that you didn't want me? Why didn't you just leave me there? If I hadn't seen the White Way of Delight or the Lake of Shining Waters, this wouldn't be so hard.
What on earth does she mean? It's just a conversation we had on the road.
I'll put the mare in.
[Marilla sighing] Take off your hat.
Lay it and your bag on the bench.
I simply don't understand.
Were there no boys at the asylum? There was an abundance of them.
But Mrs.
Spencer said distinctly that you wanted a girl about my age, and the matron thought that I would do.
This is what comes of sending word and not going ourselves.
Follow me.
Don't dally.
I'm sorry to disappoint you, but there's nothing to be done.
We want a boy to help Matthew with the farm work.
A girl would be of no use to us.
Do you understand? - I can't say that I do.
- I beg your pardon? I don't mean any disrespect, but couldn't I do the farm chores even though I'm a girl? That's not the way of things and you know it.
But couldn't I? I'm as strong as a boy, and I prefer to be outdoors instead of cooped up in a kitchen.
I don't understand the conundrum.
For example, what if, suddenly, there were no boys in the world, none at all Fiddlesticks.
It doesn't make sense that girls aren't allowed to do farm work when girls can do anything a boy can do and more! Do you consider yourself to be delicate and incapable? Because I certainly don't.
Anyway, since I'm here now, couldn't you consider it? I could not.
And put those fool notions out of your head.
Now come along.
Let's get you washed up for supper.
Oh, good gracious, child, what's happened here? I was pinching myself a lot today, to prove that this was all true.
You're not eating at all.
I can't.
I'm sorry.
I'm in the depths of despair.
Can you eat when you're in the depths of despair? I've never been in the depths of despair, so I can't say.
Well, did you ever imagine that you were in the depths of despair? No, I didn't.
It's a very uncomfortable feeling indeed.
When you try to eat, a big lump comes right up into your throat, and you can't swallow anything, not even if it was a chocolate caramel.
I had chocolate caramel once, two years ago, and it was simply delicious.
I hope you won't be offended that I can't eat.
Everything is extremely nice.
I guess she's just tired.
Best put her to bed.
Fetch your bag and follow me.
[sighing] [door creaking] [soft music] Undress, quick as you can, get to bed.
I'll come back in a few minutes for the candle.
[panting and sniffling] [crying] [sobbing] [sobbing] Good night.
How can you call it a good night when you know this must be the very worst night I've ever had? [sobbing] Oh, that is a filthy habit.
I dare say a man's got a right to smoke when his mind's burdened.
I dare say yours is, too.
Yes, this is certainly a fine kettle of fish.
One of us will have to drive over and see Mrs.
Spencer tomorrow, that's for certain.
The girl will have to be sent back.
Yup, I suppose so.
You suppose so? Don't you know it? Well, it seems a pity to send her back.
She's so set on staying.
Matthew Cuthbert, do you mean to say you think we ought to keep her?! No, no, I-I-I-I No, I suppose not.
I should say not.
What good would she be to us? We might be some good to her.
I believe that child has bewitched you.
I can see it plain as plain you want to keep her.
She's a real interesting kind of person.
That's one way to put it.
You should've heard her talk coming from the station.
She can talk fast enough and it's nothing in her favour.
I don't mind the conversation.
I don't like children who have so much to say.
There's something I don't understand about her.
No, she's got to be dispatched straight way back where she came from.
I could hire a boy to help me and, uh she could be company for you.
I'm not suffering for company.
And I'm not gonna keep her.
Well, now, it's just as you say of course.
I'm going to bed.
[Anne crying] [crickets chirring] [trilling] [sobbing] [birdsong] [rooster crowing] [birdsong] [soft music] Dearest Snow Queen, I accept your token offering.
Had I a book, I would press these sacred blossoms between its pages so that I could forever be reminded of this treasured moment.
Nevertheless I Princess Cordelia shall cherish this gift always.
Let my kiss prove my devotion - [door opens] - What are you doing? It's time you were dressed.
I was imagining that this morning was different than what it is.
I was making believe that I was a beautiful princess and this was my sacred chamber, high in a tall stone spire Never mind your chatter.
I'm sorry.
It's just that your gable room and your lovely old cherry tree provide such scope for the imagination.
I've also been wishing with all my might that you'd tell me that you'd decided that I could stay.
Pack that inside and come downstairs.
We'll be driving to see Mrs.
Spencer after breakfast.
[soft music] Put that down at once! - Did you take anything? - No! I was only memorizing.
Let me see.
Stop your snooping and come to breakfast.
I'm pretty hungry this morning.
The world doesn't seem such a howling wilderness as it did last night.
I'm glad it's a pretty morning so we won't be driving back in the rain.
That would be extremely difficult to bear.
It's all very well to read sorrowful stories and imagine yourself living through them heroically, but it's not so easy when you're actually woeful, is it? For pity's sake, hold your tongue.
You talk entirely too much.
Yes, ma'am.
Just so's you know, I sent word to see if that French boy is available through harvest.
- Gracious me! - I can milk a cow and split wood! I can wash clothes, iron, dust, sweep and so many other things! There's no end to what I could accomplish given the chance.
I'll take care of these dishes for you, Miss Cuthbert.
You will see, I'll do them right.
Be careful with the kettle.
It's very hot.
Use both hands.
I see it clear now: this very idea was folly.
You can't make up a family.
Only kin is kin.
[thunder rumbling] Surely you'll be needing Anne more than ever since your husband's passing.
I don't want her.
I'm moving to mysister's and I got no reason to take her.
I'm sorry, but we're overcrowded as it is.
- I don't need another mouth to feed.
- [Anne]: But I can help you.
Haven't I been of help to you? Please don't leave me here.
You're not kin.
I got enough kin.
You're taking her back and that's final.
[thunder] [utensils falling] I'm so sorry! Nothing's broken.
Oh, you'll never keep me now.
I was never going to keep you.
I'll be back in time for tea.
Anne Goodbye, Mr.
Cuthbert.
I, uh didn't say I'd hire a boy to be rid of you.
It was in hopes that you could stay.
Thank you.
I'll never forget you.
You take care now Anne with an E.
Oh, for heaven's sake.
[clucking] My brother is a ridiculous man.
I think he's lovely.
He's ever so sympathetic, and he didn't seem to mind how much I talked.
In fact, he seemed to like it.
I felt he was a kindred spirit as soon as ever I saw him.
You're both queer enough, that's for sure and certain.
I've made up my mind to enjoy this drive.
It's been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy something if you make up your mind firmly that you will.
Of course, you must make up your mind firmly.
I believe this is something you and I have in common.
[seagulls squawking] I wish I was a seagull.
They're the most carefree of all the birds, don't you think? Look.
Wild roses! Isn't pink just the most bewitching colour? I love it, but I can't wear it.
Redheaded people can't wear pink, not even in the imagination.
Do you know of anybody whose hair was red when she was young, but got to be another colour when she grew up? I shouldn't think it likely.
There's another hope gone.
"My life is a perfect graveyard of buried hopes.
" I read that sentence in a book once, and I say it to comfort myself whenever I'm disappointed in anything.
Don't see where the comforting comes in, myself.
Because it sounds so romantic, as if I were a heroine in a storybook.
- You must've gone to school.
- Not a great deal, although I went recently when I was back at the asylum.
I love school, but when I'm in a household with so much to attend to, the children and the cooking and the chores, it just wasn't an option.
Is there a reason why Green Gables is so secluded? A reason? My family wasn't inclined toward idle chatter.
Do you miss your parents terribly? They lived good, Christian lives.
You can't begrudge God for bringing them home.
I suppose not.
You suppose not?! Why is it you find yourself an orphan? It happened when I was an infant.
I'd like to know the circumstances, if you've a mind to tell them.
I don't mind telling stories.
"Somewhere in a far-off land, in a place whose name I do not care to remember, a gentleman lived not long ago, one of those with a lance and ancient shield on a shelf who keeps a skinny nag and a greyhound for racing" How dare you? - What? - Do you take me for a fool? It's just it's a much better story than mine.
I didn't ask for any story, I asked for yours.
If you can't tell the truth, then I have no time for you.
If you'll let me tell you what I imagine about myself, you'll find it ever so much more interesting.
Wishing something is different than it is will not make it so.
Truer words were never spoken.
My parents were Walter and Bertha Shirley.
They were newlyweds, and they were poor as church mice.
They died of a fever when I was three months old.
So I've been earning my keep for as long as I can remember.
And I suppose I was lucky that I was placed out instead of staying in the asylum.
I never understood it.
If children are such a burden, then why do people have so many of them? Nevertheless it's a shame I'll never have the opportunity.
What do you mean? To be one.
- [neighing] - Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa! - Ah! - [barking] Anne! No! Go home! Go home! [whimpering] Oh, my Lord! Are you all right? - Shhh.
- Oh, dear Lord! - I'm fine.
Here you are.
- Oh, oh, oh, oh.
Shhh.
It's all right.
It's all right, Belle.
There's no need to worry anymore, Belle.
- Belle? - That's her name.
Wasn't that an adventure? Wasn't it just.
[Anne laughing] - You're sure you're all right? - Mm-hmm.
Oh.
You were very level-headed.
I'm used to a ruckus.
[clicking] - Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa.
- [Belle chuffing] My, my, you're the last folks I was looking for today, but I'm real glad to see you.
And how are you doing, dear Anne? I'm well enough, thank you.
What brings you by, Miss Cuthbert? The fact is, Mrs.
Spencer, there's been a queer mistake somewhere and I've come over to see where it is.
Matthew and I sent word for you to bring us a boy from the asylum.
We told your brother Robert to tell you we wanted a boy.
Marilla Cuthbert, you don't say so.
Why, Robert sent word through his daughter Nancy that you wanted a girl.
Oh, that Nancy is a terrible flighty thing.
I've often had to scold her for her heedlessness.
I'm dreadfully sorry about this.
It was our own fault.
We should've come to you ourselves, and not left an important message to be handed along by word of mouth.
However, the mistake has been made and the only thing to do is to set it right.
I suppose the asylum will take her back, won't they? I suppose.
But it might not be necessary to return her.
My neighbour, Mrs.
Blewett, was just saying to me she's overburdened by her large family and she wishes she'd sent for a girl to help.
Anne will do nicely.
I call this positively providential.
We'll call on her and see.
I'm sure she'll agree.
[crying] How old are you and what's your name? Anne Shirley.
I'm just 13.
Hmm.
You don't look as if there's much to you.
But you're wiry.
I dunno, but the wiry ones are the best after all.
If I take you, you'll do as I say and speak when spoken to.
I don't suffer no backtalk, and if I find you lacking, you'll know the toe of my boot.
I expect you to earn your keep, and no mistake.
I'm at my wits' end with this one.
He'll be the death of me.
[wailing] That's a colic cry.
What? He'll do better if you swaddle him.
And gripe water helps.
Anne has worked for large families before.
And work she will.
This ain't no charity house.
Well, I suppose I can take her off your hands, Miss Cuthbert.
If you like, I can take her right now.
Well, I I don't know.
I I didn't say Matthew and I had absolutely decided we wouldn't keep her.
I just came over to find out how the mistake had occurred.
I'd better take her home again and talk it over with my brother.
I ought not to decide on anything without consulting him.
If we make up our minds not to keep her, we'll send her over to you.
Otherwise, you can assume that she'll be staying with us.
Will that suit you, Mrs.
Blewett? - I suppose it'll have to.
- Very well.
- [baby crying] - Good day.
- [crying] - [barking] Oh, Miss Cuthbert, did you really just say that perhaps you'd let me stay at Green Gables, or did I only imagine that you did? Yes, I did say that and no more.
But it isn't decided yet and perhaps we'll conclude that Mrs.
Blewett should take you after all.
I'd rather go back to the asylum than live with her.
I keep expecting her to chase after us on a broomstick.
I would like you to hold your tongue on the ride home.
I've got plenty to think about.
[whinnying] [soft music] I'll thank you to keep your questions to yourself until we can speak in private.
Run along inside.
Put your bag upstairs and put the kettle on.
Yes, Miss Cuthbert.
Wipe that silly grin off your face.
I wouldn't give a dog I liked to that Blewett woman.
Trouble is, I don't know about keeping her.
She's an interesting little thing.
More to the point if she was a useful little thing.
I propose we give her a one-week trial to see how she behaves.
She has five days.
I'll need a lot of convincing, that's for certain.
[cow lowing] Oh, for Heaven's sake.
- [crickets chirring] - [owl hooting] I noticed last night that you threw your clothes all about the floor when you took them off.
That is a very untidy habit and I can't allow it.
You must fold your clothing neatly and place it on the chair.
I haven't any use for little girls who aren't neat.
I was so harrowed up in my mind last night, I didn't think about my clothes at all.
I'll fold them nicely tonight.
Although I have been known to forget.
I'm usually in such a hurry to finally get to bed.
Well, you'll have to remember if you're going to stay here.
You understand that you're on trial, yes? Yes.
A decision will be made in one week.
Now say your prayers and get into bed.
I never say any prayers.
What?! I said them at the asylum Sunday school.
I liked the catechism.
There's something splendid about some of the words, "infinite and unchangeable.
" It's not quite poetry, but it sounds a lot like it, doesn't it? We're not talking about poetry, Anne, we're talking about prayers! Don't you know it's a terrible wicked thing not to say your prayers every night? I'm sorry, I was never taught to say them.
You must say your prayers while you're under my roof.
Of course, if you want me to.
I'd do anything to oblige you.
But you'll have to tell me how to say them for just this once.
You must kneel down.
Why must people kneel down to pray? If I really wanted to pray, I'll tell you what I'd do.
I'd go into a great big field, all alone, or into the deep, deep woods, and I'd look up into the sky, up-up-up, into that lovely blue sky without end, and I would just feel a prayer.
Well, I'm ready.
What am I to say? You're old enough to pray for yourself.
Just thank God for your blessings and ask Him humbly for the things that you want.
I'll do my best.
[sighing] Gracious heavenly Father That's what ministers say in church, so I suppose it's all right for private prayer? Gracious heavenly Father I thank Thee for the White Way of Delight and the Lake of Shining Waters, and for dear Belle, and the lovely Snow Queen.
I'm really extremely grateful for them.
And that's all the blessings I can think of just now to thank Thee for.
And as for things I want, they're so numerous that it would take me a great deal of time to name them all, so I shall only mention the two most important.
Please let me stay at Green Gables, please let me be good-looking when I grow up.
Yours respectfully, Anne Shirley.
There.
Did I do it all right? That'll do for now.
Get into bed, child.
Oh! I just realized I should've said "Amen" in place of "yours respectfully" the way ministers do? Do you suppose it'll make any difference? - I don't suppose it will.
- As God is my witness, I will do everything in my earthly power to make you want to keep me.
Good night.
God, give me strength to succeed in my quest! - That will do.
- Sorry.
I quite like praying.
Well, it's time to say good night.
Good night.
[sighing] That girl's next door to a perfect heathen.
God only knows what we're getting ourselves into.
[rooster crowing] [cattle lowing] Anne?! Anne! She's gone! - Gone? - I'll check the silverware.
[clucking] Eggs! That's one chore done! Now I've met all the chickens, so you don't need to make any introductions! I've been up since before the sun.
I was too excited to sleep.
And I wanted to start proving to you that I should stay.
It's so easy to love Green Gables, isn't it? I'll let the milkers out to graze.
I'll have breakfast on soon.
May I take these blossoms up to my room? No.
You don't want your room or your person cluttered up with flowers.
You should've left them on the tree in the first place.
I felt a little that way, too.
I felt I shouldn't shorten their lovely lives by picking them.
I mean, I wouldn't want to be picked if I were a blossom.
Wouldn't it be lovely to be a blossom? Yesterday, you wanted to be a seagull.
And the power and the glory forever.
Amen.
[laughing] I like this prayer.
It's lovely.
Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name! It's like a line of music.
Just get on with the business of learning it.
"Our Father, who art in heaven" Regardless of the outcome here, you should have something to wear besides that flimsy bit of business.
I have a leftover piece of cotton on a bolt that may do nicely.
You're going to make me a dress? You need something suitable that fits you.
A new dress! I've never had a new dress.
Not ever.
I can't wait to have puff sleeves and ever so many flounces! Do you think you can adorn it with lace at the cuff and neckline, too? I don't believe in frills or flounces.
But surely you don't mind puff sleeves? All the girls are wearing them.
Puff sleeves are divine.
Waste of fabric.
Oh.
Well, I'm sure if it's a lovely azure blue or willow green, I'm sure I won't mind if it's plain.
You're a vain one and no mistake.
Brown is a very sensible colour.
I'll need your dress so I can use it for a pattern.
Let's take these things off now.
Thank you, Miss Cuthbert.
I'm very grateful to have something new, really I am.
I'm sure I can imagine it's fashionable.
It shouldn't take me about a day or two.
If it looks just like this one, it shouldn't take you any time at all.
You run along now, and learn the prayer.
Yes, Miss Cuthbert.
"Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be" Puff sleeves! Good morning, Marilla.
Good morning, Rachel.
I brought you some scones.
I felt sure you wouldn't have time for baking, - what with all the hubbub.
- Thank you.
I'll just come in and sit a spell, shall I? Catch my breath.
I've been hearing some surprising things about you and Matthew.
I don't suppose you're any more surprised than I am myself.
What an incredible mistake.
The mind reels.
Couldn't you have just sent her back? We may yet, but for now, she's here on trial.
Trial? One week.
Matthew is quite set on keeping her.
And I'll admit she's a bright little thing.
But I'll need a great deal more convincing.
I know it by heart, Miss Cuthbert! Anne, this is our neighbour, Mrs.
Lynde.
Well, they didn't pick you for your looks, that's sure and certain.
She's terribly skinny and homely, Marilla.
[Rachel chuckling] All elbows and knees.
[laughing] And did you ever see such freckles? And hair as red as carrots.
Dear, dear me.
I hate you.
- Anne.
- I hate you.
I hate you, I hate you!! - Anne! - How dare you call me skinny and ugly?! How dare you call me freckled and redheaded?! - You are a rude, unfeeling woman! - Well! How would you like to have such things said about you?! How would you like to be told that you're fat and clumsy and probably hadn't a spark of imagination in you?! And I don't care if I hurt your feelings by saying so.
I hope I hurt them! Because you have hurt my feelings worse than they have ever been hurt before, and I will never forgive you for this! Never, never!!! Anne! Come back here! Anne! Well I never.
It's a good thing you can send her back.
I wouldn't envy you the job of bringing that up.
You shouldn't have twitted her about her looks, Rachel.
Marilla Cuthbert you don't mean to tell me that you are upholding her in such a terrible display of temper as we've just seen? I am not trying to excuse her.
She has been very naughty, and I'll have to give her a talking-to about it.
But we must make allowances for her.
She's never been taught what is right.
And you were too hard on her, Rachel.
Well I can see now I'm going to have to be very careful what I say after this since the fine feelings of orphans, brought from goodness knows where, have to be considered before anything else.
- Now, now - Oh, no, no.
I'm not vexed.
Don't worry yourself.
I feel too sorry for you to have any anger left in my mind.
But if you will take my advice you will have that "talking-to" with a fair-sized birch switch, and get her on the next train out.
Goodbye, Marilla.
[panting] [seagulls squawking] It's been quite a swell.
She'll make her own way home.
I could go She's in her under things, so she's gotta come back.
The girl needs to learn some sense.
I'm sorry.
I shouldn't have lost my temper and embarrassed you in front of Mrs.
Lynde.
- I hope you can forgive me.
- Are you all right? - Yes.
- I'm sorry for worrying you.
I needed time to ponder.
If you let me stay, I'll do my very best not to fly into another temper ever again.
I appreciate that you're contrite, Anne, but the person that you owe the apology to is Mrs.
Lynde.
But she hadn't any right to call me ugly and redheaded! You say it yourself often enough.
But there's such a difference between saying a thing yourself and hearing other people say it! You need to learn discipline.
Just magine how you would feel if someone told you to your face that you were skinny and ugly.
Remember when we were young, Marilla, and old lady Adams said - Yes.
- You were gawky Yes.
Thank you.
I recall you suffered from it.
I don't say that Mrs.
Lynde was exactly right in saying what she did to you, Anne.
- She's too outspoken - She's a bully.
But that is no excuse for such behaviour on your part.
You were rude and saucy and you must go to Mrs.
Lynde and tell her that you're sorry and ask her to forgive you.
I could never do that.
Punish me any way you like.
Shut me up in a dark, damp dungeon and I shan't complain, but I cannot ask Mrs.
Lynde to forgive me! We're not in the habit of shutting people up in dungeons.
But apologize to Mrs.
Lynde you must.
And you'll stay up in your room until you can tell me that you're willing to do it.
I'll have to stay up there forever, then, because I can't tell Mrs.
Lynde I'm sorry I said those things to her.
How can I? I'm not sorry.
I'm sorry I vexed you, but I'm glad I told her just what I did.
It was a great satisfaction.
In fact, I can't even imagine that I'm sorry.
Well, let's hope your imagination is in better working order by morning.
You can't send her back over this.
Don't be so sure.
Oh, it's it's good that, uh Rachel got a calling-down.
Wish I'd been there.
Matthew Cuthbert, I'm astonished at you.
And you'll take her up a meal? When did you ever hear of me starving people into good behaviour? But she'll stay up there until she's willing to apologize and that is final! [crickets chirring] [soft music] [seagulls squawking] [crickets chirring] [soft music] How's by you, Anne? I'm fairly well, thank you.
I imagine a good deal, so that helps pass the time.
Don't you think you'd better say it and just have it over with? If I apologize, I'll be fibbing.
Hmm.
It'll have to be done sooner or later, for Marilla's a a dreadful determined woman.
Dreadful determined.
So am I.
It's, uh it's terrible lonesome downstairs without you.
I'm not used to the quiet anymore.
The trouble is, the prospect seems humiliating.
And unfair.
But you're smart enough to find the right words, I'm sure of it.
But why should the apology have to come from me when it was Mrs.
Lynde who caused the entire situation? Well, you know I like to think that that one fine day, it won't matter a whit to you what anybody says sideways.
You have a good imagination.
I suppose it would be true enough to say I'm sorry.
I am sorry I upset Miss Marilla.
And you.
So go and smooth things over, can't you? Very well.
I'll attempt it.
For you.
Now, that's good news.
Don't tell Marilla we had a conversation, on account of we decided raising you was her department.
I shall carry our secret to my grave.
[birdsong] Whatever are you thinking, Anne, I hope you're taking this seriously.
Oh, I am.
I'm imagining out what I must say to Mrs.
Lynde.
Oh, Mrs.
Lynde, I am so extremely sorry! I could never express my sorrow, no, not even if I used up a whole dictionary.
I behaved terribly to you, and I've disgraced my dear friends the Cuthberts, who may let me stay at Green Gables even though I'm not a boy! I am a dreadfully wicked and ungrateful girl, and I deserve to be punished and cast out by respectable society forever! It was awful of me to fly into a temper because you told me the truth.
And it was the truth.
Every word you said was true.
My hair is red and I am freckled and skinny and ugly! Now, what I said to you was true, too, but I shouldn't have said it! Oh, Mrs.
Lynde, please, please say you can forgive me! If you refuse, oh, it'll be a lifelong sorrow on a poor little orphan girl.
Please say you forgive me, Mrs.
Lynde! There, there.
Get up, child.
Of course I forgive you.
I guess I was a little hard on you, but I'm just an outspoken person.
You mustn't mind me, that's what I say.
Thank you for your kind consideration.
I look forward to never minding what you say again.
Indeed.
Although it can't be denied your hair is terrible red.
But there may be hope for it.
There was a girl in our class who had hair every bit as red as yours.
Do you recall, Marilla? But when she grew up, it darkened to a real handsome auburn.
I wouldn't be a mite surprised if yours did, too.
Oh, Mrs.
Lynde, you've given me hope! I shall always remember that you are a benefactor We should run along, Rachel.
Thank you for your graciousness.
Of course.
She has a queer way of expressing herself.
Forcible-like.
I apologized pretty well, didn't I? I thought since I had to do it, I might as well do it thoroughly.
You did it thoroughly, all right.
I hope you'll try to control your temper better in the future.
I will.
I absolutely will.
Although apologizing is my new favourite thing.
[laughing] I'm going to prove myself worthy of staying, Miss Cuthbert.
I've been making a list in my head of all the ways I might be useful to you both.
And in addition to the indoor chores, I'm sure I can help with the outdoor chores, too.
I'm much stronger than I look.
It isn't too You hired a boy? But I haven't even finished my trial yet.
There's work needs to be done either way.
How long will you be here? Allô.
You must be Anne.
- With an E.
- Je m'appelle Jerry.
Jerry Baynard.
Nice to meet you.
Baynard.
Foolhardy.
Pardon? Your surname means reckless or foolhardy.
Charlemagne even named his impossible horse Baynard.
I don't know him Charlemagne.
Of course you don't.
He died hundreds of years ago.
- So you living here now? - Yes.
Probably.
I I don't know! Pretty here.
You're lucky.
I don't remember you from the orphanage No, no, I live in town.
Big family.
We have a small shop, but with so many some of us must work.
Well, if you come from such a large family, it may trouble your conscience to know that you are displacing my own position in my very first potential family.
I am hired through harvest, so I don't think the Cuthberts will need you if I stay.
In fact, if you hand me your pitchfork, I'll be happy to finish your task.
- What's your problem? - You.
You're my problem.
All I'm doing is my job.
What are you supposed to be doing? [coughing] My apology was an unmitigated success.
Mrs.
Lynde was very pleased.
It's not Rachel Lynde that you need to worry about.
Well, Miss Cuthbert seemed pleased, too.
Now you're talking.
It'll ease Marilla's mind that I've got help.
Matthew are you sure you still want me to stay? The thing of it is, and Marilla won't admit this, but she's getting older, too.
I'll go right in! That's a good idea.
Hey, hey.
- Good day to you, Matthew.
- William.
Checking the perimeter? Anything I should know about? I wanted to talk to you about your new acquisition.
New? The orphan girl from Nova Scotia.
Word in town has it that you're keeping the girl.
Well we're pretty well decided, that's true enough.
I wonder if Marilla and the girl could come to call.
Her name's Anne.
The girl.
And that's that's real neighbourly of you.
Uh, I'm guessing that she and your Diana they're about the same age.
Before we permit our children to associate with your "Anne," my wife and I need to assure ourselves that she won't corrupt their good natures or exert any negative influence.
I'm sure you can understand.
Oh, I I understand.
Very good.
- Afternoon tea tomorrow? - Tea tomorrow.
Excellent.
Good day to you.
You've got an invitation to tea tomorrow afternoon.
Barry's.
They want to meet Anne.
I haven't finished the dress.
She can't go wearing that.
Oh, my heavens.
Who are the Barrys and why do they want to meet me? Our neighbours.
A very respectable family.
Hem.
Buttons.
You'll want to be on your best behaviour.
But why? They have two little girls who are very well-mannered.
Do they need help? Diana is the girl - nearest your age.
- If you stay here, perhaps you two will become friends.
A real friend.
Let go! Let go of me! - Shut it! I mean it.
- [panting] [whimpering] Go get it.
- Hold her down.
- Please don't! Don't! Stop talking.
Guess what, Princess Cordelia.
We're sick of you and your stupid stories! - Stupid stories! - Liar! [squealing] This little mousey made too much noise.
- Squeak squeak squeak - Squeak squeak squeak But then it got caught in a trap.
So now no more squeaking.
So shut your face from now on.
- Let's go.
- [laughter] I'm so sorry.
Speak only when spoken to.
No startling speeches.
Anne? What's wrong? Are you ill? No, Miss Cuthbert.
I'm fine.
Don't worry.
I'll be quiet as a mouse.
Um, I don't feel nearly as squashed in it as I did in my old one.
High praise indeed.
You've got room to grow.
It's so nice to be wearing something new, I don't even mind not having puff sleeves.
This was mine as a girl, so it's far from new but it'll do nicely.
Thank you.
It's so pretty.
You look clean and tidy, and that's what counts.
- Isn't this lovely.
- Hand it here.
- May I try it on? - That is not a toy.
This is a treasured possession.
- Do you understand? - I completely understand.
Amethyst is my favourite.
I think diamonds pale in comparison.
Do you now? Amethysts are so much more romantic.
This was my grandmother's.
My mother bequeathed it to me.
Well, it's perfectly elegant.
Are you ready to go? - I'm not sure.
- What do you mean? It's just this is a meeting of great auspiciousness.
What if she doesn't like me? It's her mother you've got to reckon with.
If Mrs.
Barry doesn't like you, it won't matter a wit how much Diana does.
Whatever is the matter with you, child? You haven't said a word since we left.
You're not yourself.
Perfect.
Good afternoon, Miss Cuthbert.
Afternoon, Mrs.
Barry.
Please, call me Eliza.
And this must be Anne.
Good afternoon.
Good afternoon.
Afternoon.
Thank you for having us, Eliza.
Marilla, Anne, please come in.
I don't believe you said two words during tea.
You didn't even remark on the cake.
Mother let me help her bake it special.
You enjoyed it didn't you? The cake was scrumptious.
Scrumptious.
[chuckling] Have you always been shy, or does it come from being an orphan? I'm less shy than reticent.
Goodness, there's another 25-cent word.
It's just Yes? I like to read.
When I can.
I like reading, too, but Mother prefers that I do needlepoint.
Does needlepoint provide much scope for the imagination? I don't think imagination is my strong suit.
Really? I don't know what I'd do without mine.
Life would be an agony.
An utter agony.
Agony.
[chuckling] I make up stories all the time.
I could never do that.
I like to imagine that I am a princess in a tower.
Or Joan of Arc riding into battle! Or a forlorn bride who lives by the sea but never speaks to anyone, because her one true love was lost when his ship went down and disappeared beneath the waves! [Anne laughing] Wonderful.
Could you tell me a story now? - I could tell you 12! - [laughter] Diana do you think you could like me just a little? I already do.
Shall we swear to be best friends forever and ever? It's dreadfully wicked to swear.
No, it's not my kind of swearing.
There are two kinds.
I know because I have a worldly outlook.
This kind isn't wicked at all.
It means vowing and promising solemnly.
I swear it does.
See? - How do you do it? - Well This ought to be done by moonlight or over running water, but we'll just imagine that it's night time and that this path is a stream.
Hold this and twist your pinky finger around mine.
I'll repeat the oath first.
I solemnly swear to be faithful to my bosom friend, Diana Barry, for as long as the sun and moon shall endure.
And then she said it and put my name in.
And then we sent our oath into the world.
Not in the - [Marilla sighing.
] - Sorry.
I'll collect them.
It was a wonderful afternoon! I'm so relieved! It seems you made a favorable impression with the Barrys.
And Diana didn't mind my stories at all.
In fact, I told her two, and we promised to make up another the next time we're together.
Diana says she doesn't have much imagination, but I don't think it matters, since I have enough for both of us.
They're hosting a church picnic next week at the Lake of Shining Waters.
I've never been to a picnic.
Can we go, Miss Cuthbert? [sighing] We'll see.
Diana and I are kindred spirits.
And I think she'd be struck quite sad if I were to be sent away.
Please take my shawl upstairs and lay it neatly on my chair.
May I go outside after and help Matthew with the cattle? I can't wait to tell him everything! As long as you're helping and not just flapping your gums.
[soft, enchanting music] I'm sorry to arrive so late to the ball, dear Prince Wisteria.
One of my squires returned on horseback after a harrowing journey and handed me a letter that required my urgent attention.
So please, do not doubt my love.
and please, please let the Cuthberts decide to keep me.
I realize now it's the only thing I truly want, so you don't have to worry yourself about my red hair.
[chuckling] Amen.
Where is my brooch? - It should be there on your shawl.
- It is not.
Nor is it in my jewellery box.
Did you take it? I was playing with it, but I didn't take it.
- You were told not to touch it.
- I'm sorry.
It's just it's so beautiful, I couldn't resist.
You were told to set the shawl on the chair.
I did.
I've looked everywhere and the brooch is nowhere to be found.
[sighing] Give it back.
Right now.
But I didn't take it, Miss Cuthbert.
Honest, I didn't.
I don't believe you.
Where else would it be? Confess at once.
But I I'm not going to live with a thief under my roof.
You confess to stealing the brooch, or you have no future here at Green Gables.
- But I didn't take it.
- Confess.
Or I'll send you right back to the asylum.
If I don't confess you'll send me back? Confess to what you have done.
If I do, can I stay here at Green Gables? Did you, or did you not, take the brooch? I lost it.
I I was I was playing Lady Cordelia when I took the brooch outside with me.
As I was drawing water from the well, I leaned over to make a wish and it fell in.
I heard it make a splash as it disappeared down into the depths.
I'm ever so sorry, Miss Cuthbert.
Pack your things.
But you said if I confessed I could stay! I told you that brooch meant a great deal to me.
No, b-b-but I made it up! None of that was real! I didn't take your brooch! I don't know where it is! Please, Miss Cuthbert, you have to believe me! I don't have to do anything.
Please, Miss Cuthbert I can't trust one word out of your mouth.
- Please - Enough.
You're not to leave this room tonight.
Tomorrow, you will go at first light.
[soft music] Matthew! Matthew! Yah! Yah! Yah! Giddy-up! [soft, dramatic music] Yah! Yah! [whistle blowing] [soft, dramatic music] [whinnying] Did I miss it? Did I miss the train? Not to worry, your girl got on all right.
[train whistle in the distance] [mournful music] [soft music] [music fading] [train whistle blowing] Announcer: On the next brand-new episode of Anne She's no longer in residence.
She has to be here.
So if you wouldn't mind conveying me towards my new life.
What if something horrible has happened and it's my fault? I am my own family now.
I am all I need.
Announcer: Anne, Sunday April 2nd at 8:00 on CBC.
Narrator: James Wolfe is set to storm the city of Quebec.
Announcer: Canada: The Story of Us, special two hour series premier, Sunday, March 26th at 8:00 on CBC.