Tatie Danielle (1990) Movie Script

The stewed fruit's burning!
What's happening?
You gave me a fright.
My mouth's dry,
get me some sugar water.
You'll kill me!
One of these days, you'll kill me!
That's enough, Lookout!
You silly old thing.
His table manners are better than yours.
Don't be mean.
My spoon.
- Sweetener.
- Where's my head?
You don't have a head, poor Odile.
You've got a chickpea
up there instead.
I won't eat it, anyway.
I don't feel well.
You're in great shape.
I'll die before you.
I certainly hope so.
Comb your hair.
You look like a lunatic.
I didn't have time.
No time, no time. Slattern.
See what a mess he makes.
Yes, that's right...
I'm going into town.
You've always got time for dawdling.
Cleaning the chandelier
is another story.
I forgot the meatballs at the butcher's.
I can't find them.
Meatballs again?
They're very tasty.
I'll get your medicine too,
you've run out.
We'll have to go to the bank.
Why not?
- I won't go to the bank.
- You're being mean again.
If you gave me authorisation,
you wouldn't need to go.
And let you clean me out?
I'm not blind, you know.
What a te'ble thing to say.
I've heard enough. I'm going.
Say it properly:
"What a terrible thing."
Did you find out
where the Laduries are?
They're at their son's in Cassis.
In Cassis?
He's had a house built.
They're away for two months.
They put their dog to sleep.
Its back end was paralysed.
Take Lookout with you,
he needs some fresh air.
He's been in the garden all afternoon.
You know he's as strong as a mule.
I'm not strong enough.
I'd rather take the car.
Walk. It's good for you.
All right, Lookout. Let's go.
We won't be long.
- Is there anything you'd like?
- I'd like to be able to read in peace.
Lookout, come here!
Be a good boy and don't pull.
Silly goose.
- Leave me alone.
- It's an emergency.
We have to get him out.
I won't answer!
What worries me
is your lack of self-control.
- That's enough!
- Go ahead.
What are you waiting for?
Break my arm.
He'll break her arm, you'll see.
Blasted tap.
My poor Edouard! Look at this.
I scrub and scrub...
That'll do.
Edouard, she mentioned
the bank authorisation again.
But don't worry, I won't give in.
She's really playing up today.
What do you mean, "who"?
That stupid Odile!
She steals now. That's all I need.
100 francs were missing
from my box.
She pretends to count
but I know her game.
We'd be in the bank every day.
The street's been pedestrianised now.
No cars, just flower pots.
Totally impractical.
She forgets everything.
She left the front door open.
She'll get us killed.
I'd be better off dead, anyway.
God, why won't You let me die?
So I can be with Edouard.
I'm a lonely old woman,
at the mercy of a lunatic.
Good night, Edouard.
Come and fetch me soon,
I'm very unhappy.
You were right,
she hates the dog.
Who? Odile, for heaven's sake!
Mind your feet!
Lookout, the postman!
Lookout, come here!
Be quiet.
Get away from there, go on!
This dog is impossible.
Aren't you ashamed of yourself?
We'll get into trouble some day.
Here's your paper.
And a letter from Paris.
Must be from your nephew.
It's a bit tidier now.
Let's go in, I'm worn out.
They've got money to burn.
Lookout, a spaniel.
German shepherd.
The nutcase.
Was I too long?
I feel faint.
You didn't have any lunch.
That's very naughty.
- Maybe I could have a cake?
- No.
As little sugar as possible,
Dr Millet said.
Cone on, let's go to the bank.
You need some air.
- I don't want to.
- Don't be a baby.
Everyone's looking at us.
It's always the same with you.
I won't stand idly by
while you steal my money.
- Don't talk nonsense.
- Steal an egg and you'll steal an ox.
You stay there.
You're very naughty.
I've got to die of something.
Lazy bugger.
- Screw you, you old bitch!
- How dare you insult an elderly woman!
"From Mrs Poulichet, his wife,
Mr and Mrs Breslin and daughter,
Mr and Mrs Thomas and their children..."
- Thomas from the garage?
- The Breslins have the garage.
- So Thomas is the bankrupt one.
- That's it.
- Who has the retarded child?
- The Breslins.
We all have crosses to bear.
You haven't opened your letter.
- What letter?
- The one from your nephew.
- If it's from them, it'll be bad news.
- Open it anyway.
You're dying to open it,
so why don't you?
Good heavens,
they're coming on Wednesday.
- That's tomorrow.
- I knew it was bad news.
Jean-Pierre says
they'll visit his parents' grave.
They won't be coming
this summer because...
- They're going to Greece.
- I couldn't care less.
They phoned several times
but got no reply.
They won't stay for lunch
so as not to be any trouble.
- I'll prepare a little snack.
- They're not coming for lunch.
- But he's your nephew.
- Great-nephew. Not quite the same.
They're so nice.
They always invite you to Paris.
It'll be nice to see them.
The kids must have grown.
Are they coming too?
Even better.
I'll fix a quick snack.
That's right.
I wash my hands of the whole thing.
They're delivering furniture
at the Bernots'.
I think they're getting
the kitchen done.
At their age? Ridiculous.
They must have money.
All that black market business
he did in the war.
What was I going to do?
I can't remember.
Maybe clean the chandelier?
It's starting again.
I don't feel well.
- My intestines are bunged up.
- Have a rest before dinner.
I'll close the shutters
and bring you some herb tea.
Are you sure you closed the door?
There's a draught.
Of course I did.
You're right. I forgot.
You'll get us killed one of these days.
Do you recognize the house?
- Here's Odile.
- Hello!
Be quiet, Lookout.
- He's only playing.
- Yes, of course.
Come in out of the rain.
I've made you
something nice and hot to eat.
Hello, Auntie.
The Parisians are here.
How are you, Auntie Danielle?
So-so, dear Catherine.
I was so looking forward
to seeing you.
I'm so old,
it's time I joined Edouard.
Don't say that...
It's nothing.
You're just tired,
the weather's so changeable.
Odile says it came on suddenly.
Suddenly, that's right.
Are those the children?
How nice. Thank you, my child.
- It's Jean-Christophe.
- Ah, yes. Christophe.
I'm eight years old.
Hello, young lady.
It's Jean-Marie, Auntie.
How silly of me, he's a boy.
He has a pretty girl's eyes.
I'll put those sweets away.
She isn't allowed sugar.
I hope you prepared
a snack for the children?
Go with Odile, boys.
Don't tire Auntie out.
I'll keep these. She steals everything.
It's one of her little ways.
I'll have to let her go, but...
...who'll take care of me?
No one wants an old woman.
Maybe an old folks' home?
My Edouard wouldn't have wanted it.
Poor Edouard...
Imagine dying on Armistice Day.
They beat old people in homes.
Don't worry, Auntie.
We won't abandon you.
You're our only family.
You have a good heart.
Believe me...
I've fed and lodged Odile
and she steals from me.
She doesn't come when I call
and she forgets everything.
Her cooking is disgusting.
Even the dog won't eat it.
She'll kill me with her meatballs.
And, of course...
...there's the authorisation.
What authorisation, Auntie?
She wants a bank
authorisation to rob me!
Don't say anything, she'd beat me.
Nobody will beat you. We're here.
So... You've been
to your parents' grave?
- And we pulled out the weeds, as usual.
- That's good.
They weren't around long.
They weren't very hardy.
Dying of flu, how silly.
It was the Asian flu epidemic of 1956,
it was dreadful.
- 20,000 people died.
- Wrap up warm, anyway.
- Weren't you a brunette?
- No, always a redhead.
But you dye your hair?
- Just a colouring shampoo.
- I see.
Has your sister forgotten me?
She works, she couldn't make it.
I see.
- She still hasn't married that boy?
- Not yet.
She is rather plain.
She has her style.
She'll visit you this summer.
We're off to Greece in July.
You won't be coming?
What a shame.
Your visits make me so happy.
We'll let you rest now.
It upsets me to see her like that.
She'll be as bright
as a button tomorrow.
If you could ask her to give me the
authorisation, it would be very useful.
We'll talk about it
when she's better.
Kiss her for us,
we don't want to wake her.
I'll phone tomorrow.
Please answer. Last week
I phoned at least 20 times.
I know.
- Take good care of her.
- Don't worry.
- Goodbye, Odile.
- Goodbye, children.
Drive carefully.
Mrs Ladurie!
I'm so glad you're back!
We had wonderful weather in Cassis.
Off you go. Don't be late!
Lookout, get out of the way.
I'm busy.
Behave, Lookout.
You're making me cross.
"Besides the lack of hygiene
and the bad food,
the nursing home's residents were often
tied to the bars of their beds
for days at a time."
"Manager Hector Jobic
and his common-law wife
Madeleine Joxe deny everything."
Monsters. I'd have
their heads chopped off.
So you've decided
to clean the chandelier.
About time.
Quite a fall.
What a mess, silly Odile.
You're always so clumsy.
Know what I think, Lookout?
It's Paris, here we come.
Poor Miss Damballe, what a tragedy.
What a way to die, it's unthinkable.
Imagine cleaning
a chandelier at her age.
She was very attached
to your aunt. She adored her.
She had a heart of gold.
She left everything to my aunt.
It'll be so strange without her.
We were neighbours for 52 years.
A lifetime.
Will she get used to Paris?
Lt'll be difficult at first,
but it's what she wanted.
- And it'll put our minds at rest.
- I understand.
Is she selling?
She'll split the proceeds
between my sister and me.
We'll look after her.
She'll want for nothing.
I know!
- Your sister seems very nice.
- She's very sweet.
Thank you for taking Lookout.
It would've been impossible in Paris.
It would be mad to take him to Paris.
We'll feel safe with him.
If you don't mind,
I'd rather not say goodbye.
I don't feel up to it.
And she might be upset about Lookout.
- How old is your dog?
- 14.
The same age as Jean-Marie.
Seven times more. He's 98.
That's old for a dog.
Are we going through Sens?
Through Sens?
I was going to take the motorway.
No, we'll go through Sens.
Hello, Auntie Danielle.
Don't squeeze me like that,
I'm suffocating.
Get this dog away from me.
He smells.
Go on, off you go.
- Don't you have homework?
- Tomorrow's Saturday.
- Will you play with me?
- I don't feel like it.
Want to go to the park?
Can't you see I'm reading?
Stop that, you're making me dizzy.
- I'm going to draw.
- Good idea.
That's right. Draw.
What a pest.
I want some peace,
after all the money I gave them.
I'm not the nanny.
I can see you!
What are you gawking at?
- Beauty Gardens, can I help you?
- Almost done.
There's always some
in the folds of the behind.
I'll tell your mummy.
Sorry, Mrs Lafosse.
That was Jean-Christophe.
He's home from school.
Thank you, Agathe.
There we are.
You can put your legs down.
That's better,
although my backside's on fire.
It'll pass. Can you turn over now?
So how's it all going with your aunt?
Fine. She's getting used to Paris.
- She's been here two months already.
- Time flies!
She must be happy with the kids.
Very. But I'm afraid they tire her.
- Did I hurt you?
- Just a nervous reaction.
You and your husband are very brave.
Looking after old people
is so rare these days.
It's only natural.
She's my husband's only family.
I see. Well, I admire you for it.
Are your parents still alive?
I've been an orphan since I was six.
My parents loved mountaineering.
They were killed
in a fall with my sister.
I've hated mountains ever since.
You poor thing,
that's dreadful. I had no idea.
Don't worry. You see, Auntie
is the grandma the kids never had.
That's why we spoil her.
What about your holidays?
My sister-in-law will stay
with her the whole three weeks.
That's perfect!
All done.
Turn over and I'll apply
some honeysuckle lotion.
It's alcohol-free, don't worry.
We forgot the moustache.
We'll do it next time.
It's not too bad, is it?
Don't leave it too long.
Goodbye, Agathe.
See you soon, then.
By the way, how is Mr Lafosse?
The stitches are out
but he still can't sit down.
He's on the mend though.
Have a nice weekend.
You too.
It's Mummy, Totoff.
How's my baby?
Is Jean-Marie back?
Dance class, I forgot.
How's Auntie? Did she eat her lunch?
Never mind. She'll eat tonight.
Is she in her room?
See if she needs anything,
and don't forget your homework.
That's fine, my angel. See you soon.
OK, "Mickey" or "Exterminator"?
You have "Mickey"? I won't forget.
Does my skin look dull?
It does a bit.
Your foundation hasn't settled.
Are you upset?
Foundation won't settle if you're upset.
No, I'm not upset.
The artillery fire
is targeting the Syrian positions...
Totoff, you'll ruin your eyes.
Lebanese forces on the Green Line...
I need some help.
Jean-Marie, dinner time.
Help mummy and I'll get Auntie.
Careful with the sauce.
- I made celery mash.
- My favourite.
- Did you call Auntie?
- Dad went to get her.
I don't want carrots.
- They're good for your muscles.
- And your temperament.
She'll eat later. She's reading.
- No starter?
- The avocados and shrimps didn't thaw.
Mum looks pretty in her new blouse.
It's Ted Lapidus,
from a discount shop.
My fine lady!
You're both crazy!
Let's buy Auntie's wallpaper
on Saturday. She could come along.
- She might like that.
- Why not?
I've got revision to do.
Here's Auntie!
- What's the test on?
- The sex life of bacteria.
Wouldn't it be fun to choose
your new wallpaper on Saturday?
It doesn't sound like fun,
but the one you have is so ugly...
I agree with Auntie. It's hideous.
I like my Smurfs.
Dad and I counted 4,000 of them!
It's a little boy's wallpaper.
It's not for Auntie.
- You're not eating, Auntie?
- Thank you, I'm not hungry.
What kind of meat is it?
Veal with basil sauce.
I can't abide basil.
- I'm sorry, I didn't know.
- You do now.
What's wrong with Mummy Bear?
- Auntie hates my cooking.
- No, she doesn't.
- She doesn't like me.
- What are you talking about?
You're right, I'm being unfair.
- I just want to please her.
- You do please her.
What's wrong?
Auntie accidentally
stepped on doggie's paw.
A tour of Paris will cheer you up.
I wouldn't wish
that afternoon on anyone.
We played black-jack all night.
It's true?
- Let me go!
- What's wrong?
I'm not like the others.
You can't have me just like that.
You're afraid to be a woman.
Time to grow up, young lady.
How dare you!
If you slap me,
I'll slap you back.
- You're fired! Get out.
- You can't fire me.
I own half of this club.
We're partners.
Kitty, a double Bloody Mary...
- I got your ballet shoes, Jean-Marie.
- Mauve ones, thanks. They're great.
- They're perfect.
- And some sweeties for Totoff.
- A kiss... Who's this for?
- For Auntie Danielle.
Here she is.
I won't get a minute's peace.
It's Jeanne... Jean-Pierre's sister.
Put this in the kitchen,
it's Italian food for dinner.
- Where's Auntie?
- In her room.
She comes every Wednesday
when they play tennis.
She's so stupid.
- It's me, Auntie.
- What a surprise.
The new wallpaper's lovely.
- This is for you.
- Thank you.
Don't kiss me near my ear.
It buzzes.
Sorry, Auntie.
Shall I sit down for a minute?
- It looks lovely.
- Doesn't make the room any bigger.
So, how are you, Auntie?
All right.
Did you do anything nice this week?
- I did nothing.
- But you like Paris?
No. But at my age,
it's too late to choose.
I sold my house,
you split the money.
- What's done is done.
- You don't regret it, do you?
No, I'm just sorry
I'm not up there with Edouard.
Could I finish reading my book in peace?
- You were so generous, Auntie.
- It won't happen twice.
- Your scarab is beautiful.
- A present from Edouard.
It'll go to Catherine.
- You don't wear jewels.
- No, not much.
You know,
I'm taking care of you in July,
when they're in Greece.
I'm worried.
I'm not a good cook.
- You can't be worse than Catherine.
- So that's it!
She was worried
about your appetite.
I've been eating French for 80 years.
Here, it's kiwi salads,
raw fish in lime...
...and there's worse.
In Auxerre, we eat meatballs.
Are you still engaged?
- Yes.
- How old is he?
35, coming up to 36. Why?
There's a big difference between you.
Ten years.
Well, at least you found someone.
I hope I'll get to meet him one day.
Of course.
- He's not in Paris at the moment.
- I see.
Just as I thought.
- I'll make dinner.
- Do that.
Take the hydrangea to the sitting-room.
It'll just get in my way.
I told you she was stupid.
Don't eat all the sweets
or you won't want your dinner.
Nearly ready.
He dresses like a girl now.
- Who?
- Jeanne-Marie.
Jean-Marie. That's his dance outfit.
- Dancing's a girls' sport.
- Plenty of boys do it.
- There's boys and there's boys.
- Fetch me the pepper.
- In Auxerre, the boys play football.
- On the left.
- What's this?
- A starter.
Tomatoes and mozzarella.
Stop squirming!
Cheese as a starter!
I can't wait for summer.
I like going to the park with Auntie.
I've lost my Auntie!
What's your Auntie's name?
Auntie Danielle.
"I like going to the park with Auntie."
Idiotic child!
That little walk did me good.
It was running everywhere.
- Don't be disgusting.
- Honestly!
- Hello, it's us!
- We're in my room.
Don't I get a kiss?
- What's happened?
- Totoff lost Auntie in the park.
- Where is she?
- She came back on her own.
She didn't tell me she'd lost him.
He was frightened, poor thing.
You like it, don't you, bitch?
Get a load of this, you slut!
Little tart.
You dirty girl...
Take it, you tart!
You know what, Edouard?
They're animals. Animals!
Morning, Mum.
- Answer me.
- But, Mrs...
- Miss!
- What's she yapping about?
She's pushing them up
against the wall.
- She's masculine.
- No, she's magnificent.
Look at the watch you can win!
Not bad, a bit heavy.
Who left the lid off the gherkins?
Can't you cut the cheese properly?
We're leaving in ten minutes, sweetie.
Auntie's been in the bathroom for ages.
- I think she's having a bath.
- A bath?
Why is she always
in the bathroom first thing?
She's got all day to take a bath.
Maybe it's a habit. Tell her.
No, I can't.
I don't want to hurt her feelings.
You tell her, go on.
It's Jean-Pierre.
- Are you almost done?
- No.
Catherine's going to be late.
Catherine needs her make-up bag.
"Painted ladies fade and die".
On your tummy for five
more minutes, Mrs Langman.
Have you got everything?
Our air tickets for Athens,
the boat tickets to Heraklion.
- How long's the boat journey?
- 12 hours.
But the crossing is beautiful,
especially at night.
- I've always wanted to sail at night.
- And then?
Then a bus will take us to the hotel.
Is this it? It's wonderful.
Crete looks beautiful.
"Discover Crete and its hospitality."
"Donkey trips all over the island."
That's just an option.
We'll be too tired
to move from the hotel.
Bungalows, TV, air-conditioning...
Optional, but it's a must.
Cold and hot buffet
served all day.
Perfect for children.
Sports, night clubs, shops...
And a reconstructed Cretan chapel.
You'll have such a good time.
Beauty Gardens, hello?
Hello, Mrs Lafosse.
Tomorrow's fine.
We'll do your moustache.
Bikini line, too? Bring your bikini
bottoms, you'll get a better line...
See you tomorrow, then.
Five o'clock tomorrow?
- Can I stay longer?
- You can do a good 15 minutes.
You've already got some colour.
When do you leave?
- End of the week. And you?
- I'm not taking a vacation.
- In one month.
- Not long to go.
See you tomorrow.
Bye, Mrs Langman.
Nearly time to lock up.
- What can I make for dinner?
- I made meatballs for a change.
My sister-in-law. Surprise!
- I've come to fetch you.
- On a whim?
I can't believe it.
How could Johnny do that?
He's so sweet.
Maybe he's shocked.
He'll be back.
No, it's all over. He told me.
- It's over.
- But he loves children.
Other people's.
I couldn't wait
to tell him I was pregnant.
A baby, I'm going to have my baby!
We've been trying for five years.
I had four treatments.
Fertility problems
can put pressure on a man.
- He's in denial. He's just in shock.
- What about me being shocked?
Expecting at 45, and the father
dumps me the day he finds out.
Calm down.
Get a hold of yourself.
I must look awful!
I'll fix your make-up at home.
I'm not coming up.
What will I tell Jean-Pierre?
The truth. Your brother
will never abandon you.
I don't want Auntie to see me like this.
She's always asking, "Where's Johnny?"
And "Aren't you married yet?"
Last time,
she was almost mean.
She treats me like an idiot.
I'm so ashamed.
What will happen to me?
I'm having a baby all on my own!
Calm down.
And as for Auntie...
It's just your imagination.
- We won't tell her for now, OK?
- All right.
- You're an angel.
- Dry your tears.
You'll keep the child.
Yes, Jean-Pierre.
You fought to have it,
you must keep it.
Catherine and I
will always be there for you.
With Auntie's money,
you can afford to bring up a child.
No more tears, now.
You have to be strong.
It's the smoke.
Could you put your cigarette out?
- I feel sick.
- Sorry, I'm an idiot.
- You don't want me to talk to Johnny?
- No! Not Johnny...
All right, fine.
Are you all right, Auntie?
She didn't hear you.
What would you say
to some herb tea?
- What is it?
- You can't look after Auntie in July.
- You'll come with us to Greece.
- And Auntie?
Don't worry. I have an idea.
I was worried about
spending July with Auntie.
Me too. It was
a big mistake to take her in.
I'll tell you something,
but don't mention it to Catherine.
I think she's nasty.
You're right.
She is nasty.
I've never known
anyone to be so nasty.
Wait till you hear this:
We won't be seeing Johnny.
Jeanne's got a bun in the oven.
- You're not eating.
- I can't. I feel sick.
I have a knot here.
With Jean-Marie,
I was sick for six months.
- Here's Jean-Pierre. Want to eat?
- Whatever you think.
Today's special
and some ros, please.
I've drawn up the advert.
Person to care for elderly lady."
"Three weeks in July.
References required."
"Call 47586730 daytimes
and 47474421
before 9 am or after 7 pm."
- We're monsters.
- This is all my fault.
What are you saying?
Someone will look after her.
We're not monsters.
- We need somebody responsible.
- Who'll tell Auntie?
I'll tell her.
She'll be fine, you'll see.
They're all going
to Greece, even the idiot.
An unmarried mother.
It's shameful.
They didn't waste time.
They took all my money
and they're abandoning me.
I'm getting a nurse for three weeks.
They put an ad in the paper.
How do I know?
Jean-Pierre told me.
He was so slimy,
I knew something was up.
My nephew was a leech
and his son is just the same.
It's all Catherine and the idiot's idea.
They're always all over each other.
They've got him where they want him.
The coward. Lazy swine.
They'll never have the scarab
or the pearls, never.
I've been nice up to now,
but not any more.
I should just die.
Help me get my revenge.
Come in.
- Dinner time.
- Just coming, darling.
- Wake up. Auntie's ill.
- What's wrong?
She threw up.
Help me. Call Dr Gelin.
Perfect, no temperature.
You ate too much.
I have to go back to work today.
Agathe can't cope on her own.
- Is everything OK?
- All right.
Try to get up today.
The doctor said it would do you good.
I've prepared
your food and medicine.
Don't worry about answering the phone.
- I'll try to be home early.
- You're so kind.
We've asked the Lemoines
to come over on Saturday.
- Do you mind?
- Not in the least.
I got you some magazines.
Thank you.
See you later. I'd better dash.
Off you go.
Make sure they're parallel.
- What's parallel?
- Nice and straight, next to each other.
That's good.
Auntie wouldn't eat.
She's tired, she's going to bed.
What's up with her now?
I'll see her when I finish.
We should never
have invited the Lemoines.
I heard her singing this afternoon.
I'll decorate the table, if you like.
- Thanks, darling.
- I'll go and get some flowers.
The country's beautiful.
The biggest problem is the Greeks.
- Hateful.
- Are you joking?
- No, really!
- Marc is right...
But you don't see them much.
- Just a drop.
- I hope there'll be young people.
There'll be plenty.
Especially Scandinavians.
This is delicious...
The sauce is wonderful.
Is it "Le Ntre"?
No, it's from a delicatessen
near the salon.
- Thanks for the tip.
- They hate tourists.
There's one I like...
Melina Mercouri.
You don't see her so much now.
- She's the Minister of Culture.
- That's true.
- Isn't she Joe Dassin's mother-in-law?
- That's right.
Let's drink a toast to your holiday.
To Greece!
May I introduce my aunt?
Don't let me disturb you.
I'll sit in the lounge.
You're flying Air France, I hope?
It's an excellent service.
- Do you have long in Athens?
- Four hours.
That gives you plenty of time
to visit the Plaka.
- Right, darling?
- The Plaka?
Oh, yes, it's beautiful.
We must give them
the address of that jewellers.
The one who makes
the ram-head bracelets.
Of course, I have the address somewhere.
Take plenty of Deutschmarks.
It's like the Germans never left.
If there's anything to eat...
I wouldn't say no.
Right away, Auntie.
Your aunt's peculiar.
Take care of your guests, I'll do it.
Can you believe it?
She's getting worse.
- And the ad?
- It's been a disaster. No replies.
Enough is enough.
I've had it up to here.
If I had worked...
Thank you...
I'd have done interior design.
If it were up to me,
I'd redo my flat every two years.
But Marc is so traditional.
- Sugar?
- Never with lemon tea.
I'd like another cup.
Blanchard is one of the best
in terms of exports.
- Is that enough?
- A bit more.
- His problem is that he won't delegate.
- He's been getting worse.
One should never
marry one's secretary.
That's below the belt!
I love your colour scheme.
I've always adored yellow,
it's so bright.
- No, thank you.
- It's decaf.
- All right, then.
- You see...
I've got a thing about...
Old age is terrible.
Shut up, you halfwit.
Go away.
It's me!
- Careful, I spilt oil.
- How's Auntie?
In a bad mood.
She's watching TV.
- Any replies?
- Yes, but nobody suitable.
Evening, Auntie.
Look... I bought a TV for your room.
It'll come in handy
during the holidays.
- I'll be dead next week.
- Don't say that.
The doctor says you're fine.
Your blood pressure's better than mine.
I'll set it up.
- Is there a little box?
- Of course.
They're rolling in it.
- The boys?
- Jean-Christophe is at Vincent's.
Jean-Marie and Charles
are rehearsing in his room.
- How's it going, boys?
- It's tough. It's Racine.
Agathe's taking care of everything.
She's so dynamic.
Service is slow.
- Take it easy.
- I have a client at two.
- Is Jean-Marie getting blonder?
- It's nothing, just peroxide.
- What do you mean?
- It's not a problem.
Auntie's the problem.
We only got six replies, none suitable.
She wet her bed again this morning.
- Old women always pee in bed.
- But we're leaving in one week.
I know.
There must be someone to look after her.
- I'm late.
- Two people called about the ad.
One couldn't do the dates, but
the other's coming in this afternoon.
- Is that OK?
- Thanks, Agathe.
- Did she say anything else?
- She's got references.
- Her name's Sandrine Vonnier.
- Great.
- What time?
- Four.
- Your client's here.
- What for?
I'm here to see Mrs Billard.
I'm Sandrine Vonnier.
Ready? Off it comes.
I always wear gloves,
I'm allergic to cleaning products.
Everything's very straightforward
but I'll write it all down.
I'll make a list of what Auntie eats.
She's quite fussy.
- Fine.
- I bought 50 cans of dog food.
- I'm not a very doggy person.
- You're really a life-saver.
He's very sweet,
you'll grow fond of him.
This is your room. Is the cupboard
big enough for your things?
Everything I own fits in one suitcase.
This is the toilet.
My room's on the right.
My aunt's room is at the end.
I'll introduce you.
I warn you,
she's unpredictable.
This is Miss Vonnier,
who'll be looking after you.
Jean-Pierre told you about her.
Good afternoon, Ma'am.
- "Miss". You can call her Sandrine.
- So they're dumping me on you?
She's experienced
and she'll take good care of you.
- Won't you?
- Of course.
We'll see.
We'll leave you now.
I'm showing Sandrine around.
Yes, show her around.
See you tomorrow.
Goodbye, Miss.
What do you think?
It's eight o'clock. Wake up.
- Come on, wake up.
- I don't want to get up.
You don't want to get up.
No problem.
As you wish.
See you later.
I'm late.
The shops are closed
for holidays and your dog's slow.
You don't mind a late lunch?
Even if I did, I have no choice.
And secondly, it's not my dog.
Could I have a glass of water?
You don't expect me
to eat in the kitchen?
Yes, but it's no problem
if you don't want to.
I got meatballs. Is that OK?
Couldn't be better...
I can't abide them.
I'll show her who's boss.
I'm hungry.
- Should've eaten your lunch.
- I wasn't hungry.
That's a shame.
You'll eat better tonight.
You've got a cheek.
You're paid to look after me.
But not to be driven round the bend.
You've got cakes in your room.
You can nibble on those
to pass the time.
Lazy good-for-nothing.
- Going out?
- For a little walk.
- Shall I come with you?
- No.
Your niece said
you don't go out alone.
She has no authority.
I do as I please.
Have fun.
Breakfast is ready.
I'll do your room.
Not again!
What is it this time?
I'm thirsty.
I want some sugar water.
Don't you piss enough as it is?
Look how she talks to me!
I'm going shopping.
- What are you doing?
- Nothing.
Just taking the money
you nicked from my pocket.
I need it for the shopping.
Won't be long.
She's a sow, that woman!
I don't believe it!
Get out!
It's already disgusting enough!
Have you seen the toilet?
What do you take me for?
But that's what you're paid for.
Cry and you'll piss less.
Is it swollen?
It hurts. She slapped me.
A woman of my age.
No one's ever dared to hit me.
I didn't even dirty the toilet.
No, it wasn't me.
It's after nine o'clock.
And she's not back yet.
She's a monster!
Shit, the dog.
I hate him.
Would you? You're an angel.
I'll make dinner.
I'm scared. She's brought a man back!
You're sleeping.
Do you want some dinner?
- I'm not hungry.
- Good night.
This is Michael, a friend.
- He slept over.
- I see.
I don't understand.
He wants to visit
the chateaux on the Loire.
I'll get the post.
That's not what we said.
I wouldn't have had it repaired.
Where am I going to get 7,300 francs?
My car's a clapped-out old banger!
I don't have it.
You're just a crook, that's all.
I'm not insulting you.
I'm just telling you how I see it.
That's enough! Goodbye!
- What do you want?
- I'm thirsty.
You know where the tap is.
- Why are you shouting?
- I've been done by a dodgy mechanic.
My old banger needed a small repair
and he's charging me 7,300 francs.
Where would I get that kind of money?
I just won't pick up the car.
- Any dirty laundry?
- My nightie and two hankies.
- Your sheets?
- No, not today.
That's progress.
I can pay for the repair.
Don't even think of it. It's too much.
- I have my pension.
- Pension?
- You've never worked in your life.
- I have!
- My colonel's widow's pension.
- What about your family?
It's nothing to do with them.
I do as I like with my pension.
I gave them my house.
And got no thanks.
- To "Gassot Bros. Garage".
- Double s?
That's right.
I'll go right away. It's quite far.
That's all there is, I'm afraid.
I had no time to shop.
Never mind.
- Where's the car?
- It's parked round the corner.
What you did was very kind.
- I was glad to.
- How will I pay you back?
Can you cut this up for me?
Don't worry about paying it back.
It's a gift.
It's my money.
I don't have to answer to anyone.
It's the first present I've ever had.
I can't believe it.
I was a bit rough the other day,
but you asked for it.
You were a bit rough.
Don't do it again.
I can't abide kisses,
but my heart's in it.
I can't abide them either.
Do you fancy going for a drive?
It might cheer me up.
- You don't mind if I call you Danielle?
- No, I don't mind.
Are we going for that drive, then?
- That dog is such a pea-brain!
- Just like his masters.
It's OK. She apologized.
We're going for a drive in our car!
- Who are you talking to?
- No one.
- Shall we go?
- Let's go.
That dog stinks. It's disgusting.
Go away!
Not turning the sound up?
It makes me tired.
I'd rather look at the pictures.
- Doesn't it work?
- Something's stuck.
Must be the shutter release.
It's an old camera but I love it.
- You like photography?
- I love it.
- I'll show you my photos.
- Where are they?
At my friend Nicole's.
I've done mainly portraits.
I'd like to do landscapes
but I'd have to travel.
I'll do it when I've saved some money.
A postcard.
- Greece looks nice.
- Too hot for me.
I can't abide the heat either.
You know what we should do?
Go away for a couple of days,
not too far.
Somewhere nice and cool.
But we can't, anyway.
We've got the dog.
So we have.
Out you go.
Go on. Walkies.
He's so stupid.
Go on, out you go...
- What about the collar?
- Shit, you're right!
- You didn't move?
- No.
- You sat in the car for two hours?
- Yes.
I told you to go to a caf.
You're as stubborn as a mule!
It was OK. I bought a little cake.
Little? Top marks for appetite
but you're not allowed sugar.
- I've got to die of something.
- I suppose you're right.
- Is that Michael's hotel?
- Yes.
Something wrong?
Something's wrong.
- Michael's leaving on Sunday.
- You knew he'd leave.
I'm just not over the moon about it.
- Plenty more fish in the sea.
- What do you know?
You've got an appetite.
- You're not eating?
- I've got a knot in my stomach.
He hasn't even phoned, the pig.
He'll phone.
This is for you.
You're mad, keep your jewellery.
- It's for you.
- It'll upset your family.
I want you to have it.
She's sad, but she liked the present.
It was a good idea.
The American's off. Good riddance.
I'm going to wash.
I'm going to wash.
Can I come in?
- That was my American.
- I gathered.
- When's he leaving?
- Tomorrow night.
We'd like to take the car
to spend our last night by the sea.
I'll be home tomorrow.
I've got everything ready for you.
I can even ask Nicole to come by.
I'll call you. It's only one night.
Why not?
Why not?
You're paid to stay here with me.
What's it to you? Sleep,
have breakfast, and I'll be back.
I'll call you.
You're a bitch.
You're quite capable
of taking care of yourself!
I'm not a bitch. You're a little slut!
That's the thanks I get!
I pay for your car, I give you gifts...
You said we'd go on a trip together.
I never promised anything!
You don't own me!
- I'll call my family.
- Go ahead.
No one's going to stop me
going to the seaside, no one!
Go to the seaside,
but don't bother to come back!
- You're fired!
- Don't worry, I'm leaving!
You can have
your shitty insect back!
You slut!
Give this to your family.
And here's their number.
Spit your venom out to them!
Everyone's abandoned me.
Won't be long, Edouard.
Keep back, let them through.
What happened?
A little old lady was abandoned.
Her children left
two months ago, apparently.
Two months? That's appalling.
What monsters!
What a bitch.
I don't believe this.
- Please, just one question!
- I'm too busy.
What's her family like?
The concierge is on holiday.
I just put the rubbish out.
I don't know her.
I don't get it.
Lovely people... Customers!
From the top.
I don't get it...
Charming people... Customers...
They'd been coming here for years...
I don't get it...
Customers for years, they were...
...For years, charming people...
OK, cut. That'll do.
Such monsters in the heart of Paris.
Who'd have thought it?
When's it on?
Come with me, please.
Where are they going?
In the middle of this drowsy summer,
a shocking case
to prick the nation's conscience.
An 82-year-old woman
was abandoned by her family,
locked in a flat for three weeks
in the 15th arrondissement.
She had nothing to eat but the dog food
generously left by her family.
She accidentally started a fire...
- Turn it down, it'll upset her.
- It's OK!
They're talking about you on the TV.
- You're a star.
- Really?
I'm not worth it.
- I'm all alone.
- No you're not, we're here.
Everyone's making
a great big fuss of you.
We've no more room for flowers.
You've had telegrams
from all over France, even Belgium.
People want to adopt you.
- The papers are full of you.
- The papers?
- May I see?
- The doctor's forbidden it.
Turn that television off.
Morning, Mrs Billard.
So many flowers.
- There are more outside.
- You've got some colour back.
Lend me your glasses,
I've forgotten mine.
Everything looks just fine.
You're robust, you know.
- Can I leave soon?
- Not so fast. You need rest.
We have to get you back on your feet.
You were in a bad way.
- They won't hurt my family?
- No, they won't.
It's not their fault. I was an burden.
- She's so sweet.
- She's adorable...
They should bring back
the death penalty.
I need an appointment.
Will Catherine be back?
Yes, on Monday.
- How is the poor dear?
- A little better, but it takes time.
People are such gossips.
She doesn't dare use her local shops.
- It'll be forgotten soon.
- We lost quite a few clients.
You find out
who your real customers are.
Where is the crazy old thing?
In an old folks' home.
A very nice one, apparently.
Catherine's husband
wants no more to do with her.
He's right.
That's what you get for helping people.
I didn't tell Catherine,
but after a certain age,
a home is best.
- Otherwise, they drive you crazy.
- Exactly.
It's me!
- Totoff... Where's Mummy?
- No idea.
In here, darling.
It's a relaxing mask.
I've aged 20 years.
Where do I kiss you?
- It's not the time for jokes.
- Yes, it is.
I've got good news from the lawyer.
- You didn't say you were seeing him.
- I'll explain, come on.
- Is Jeanne OK?
- She's resting.
- Tell me.
- Listen to this.
"The two charges of non-assistance
and neglect have been dropped."
After all, justice does exist.
All charges are dropped.
There, Mrs Billard.
I can't tell you what a relief that is.
- Don't cry, sweetie.
- They're tears of joy.
My aunt could have been arrested,
but they dropped
the charges because of her age.
They spoke to me about Sandrine, too.
But I'd rather draw a line
under the whole thing.
That's what you wanted.
That's all I ever think about,
I'm obsessed.
I don't understand Auntie Danielle!
What did we do
to make her hate us so much?
- Everything OK?
- Who is it?
Good night.
Why is Mrs Mauprivet crying?
I bet Mrs Billard was nasty again.
She won't let me watch her TV.
Stop tormenting Mrs Mauprivet,
it's mean.
What's she done to you?
She stinks, that's all.
You don't smell very nice,
apparently. We'll fix that.
Let's get washed.
Why are you so keen
to watch TV with her?
No one else has cable.
You're brave, coming every Sunday.
I can't abandon her. She's alone.
- How's it going?
- She was quiet yesterday.
During the week she was hell.
She makes such a mess.
- She's as bad as can be.
- She makes the old ladies cry.
Have you heard the latest?
She locked one in the shower.
I'll be going. I brought you
some flowers to say thank you.
- They're gorgeous.
- Have you got a vase?
Be brave!
45 rue du Commerce, please.
Any particular route?
- Whichever you like.
- Visiting a loved one?
Don't cry.
The old folks are happy in there.
This is it.
Come in.
Mrs Billard, this is my daughter.
Here's what you asked for.
I brought strong mustard,
Tabasco and a jar of gherkins.
They'd run out of coffee clairs.
I got chocolate ones.
Fine, thank you.
We'll leave you.
If you need anything else next time,
just tell Mother.
She's nice, my daughter, isn't she?
Terribly ugly, though.
I called you.
But you couldn't have stopped her.
You're not legally responsible.
It's a total mystery.
We're expecting a new resident.
Talk about a fuss.
What happened?
No one saw her go.
She didn't leave a note.
She didn't leave on her own.
She took everything
except the TV and the cable box.
A bit odd. We've lent them
to Mrs Mauprivet in the meantime.
Who'd kidnap an old bag like her?
It's unthinkable!
I liked her, though.
Sometimes she'd stare
out of the window for hours,
as if she was waiting for someone.
Do you want the TV back?
Let the old lady keep it.
- Is Mrs Billard coming back?
- No, never.
- Never?
- Haven't you had enough of her?
She was nice.
- Is it good?
- Yes, and it's easy to chew.
I'll take your picture.