ER Episode Scripts

N/A - s12e12

Our ice fishermen are on nebs waiting for a respiratory therapist.
Morgue picked up the nun.
Our puking boy went home with a liter of saline.
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a Compazine suppository and two very angry parents.
What about the post-op cellulitis? Surgical floor.
Lucien was feeling generous.
She threatened to hurt me.
You see that? Overnight shift has no pass-ons.
Gold stars all around.
We have no Attending for the day shift.
Clemente hasn't showed up and can't be reached.
Once again, that's a problem for the Chief of ER, and that's you.
-You can't cover until he shows up? -No, l can't.
l got physical therapy upstairs and l'm supposed to stay off my feet.
After that, l am out of here.
l could stay for a few minutes.
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if you have to leave.
-There you go.
Hey, Barnett.
What the hell are you doing here? -Uh, working.
-You quit.
-No, l didn't.
-Yes, you did.
Remember, you came to me and you gave me an ultimatum.
Said you needed time off to cut your album or you'd quit.
l have no idea what you're talking about.
Your band, Skunk Hollow.
Oh.
l'm sorry, but l'm not in a band.
l swear.
Look, Dr.
Weaver, you were pretty doped up last time we talked.
-Maybe you were just tripping a bit? -l don't trip.
Well, if you say so.
-ls she coming? -No.
-But she's watching me, isn't she? -Oh, yeah.
-Now? -Yeah.
Wait, now.
Now she's going.
Well, congratulations, Dr.
Rasgotra.
You must have impressed Albright.
How so? You've been accepted into the surgical elective.
-Really? -Oh, yeah.
Oh, my God, thank you.
Thank you very much.
l hope you feel the same way in three weeks.
Well, l'll certainly try.
l'm gonna go and phone Michael.
So you and Mikey are gonna get your own place now? Michael.
We'll be out of your hair soon.
We're looking for a place this afternoon.
Dr.
Barnett, do you know a girl named Zoe Butler? No.
Maybe.
Yeah, well maybe she's here looking for you.
Exam 2.
l-- Zoe, what are you doing? l told you not to come here.
You know l can't see you as a doctor or as anything else.
Ow, ow.
Sorry, you're gonna have some bruising.
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but at least your eye socket isn't fractured.
-Arm films are back.
-Oh, thanks, lnez.
We're gonna clean up the cuts on your face and then l'm gonna stitch you up.
Will l have scars? Well, maybe some discoloration, but it should all fade with time.
So it looks like you broke your ulna.
Which is the bone right in here.
We like to call this a nightstick fracture.
We often see it in people who try to protect themselves.
So do you wanna tell me what really happened? l told you, l fell.
l was running to catch the bus, l tripped on the curb.
lt's true.
Okay.
Okay, l'll call your father and let him know you're here.
-Wait, Ray.
-What? Don't call him.
Why not? You gotta talk to me, Zoe.
He's the one who did this.
Yo, Dr.
M.
Got your breakfast and your threads.
Thanks.
Did they get the chocolate sauce out of the tux shirt? l don't know.
But here are the magazines you asked for.
What do you think you're doing? -You talking to me? -To both of you.
You're here to work as a volunteer, not his personal assistant.
l was just going up-- Just about to give me some lame excuse and l don't want to hear it.
Get your butt over to the Admit desk and check in with Jerry.
He's a good kid.
-Bagel? -Look, man.
Stop using him as your own personal valet.
Buying your lunch and your dirty magazines.
Hey, take this and could you just pick these up.
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and put everything in the Doctor's Lounge? Thank you.
Greg, wait up.
Wait up, l need some advice.
-Stop smoking dope, slow down on porn.
-Serious.
-l am serious.
-l got a date, her name's Tamara.
l met her online.
No, it's not like that.
She's smart, beautiful, funny, black.
Sorry, African-American.
But l've never dated a sister before.
-Please don't say that.
-What, " sister" ? -Dr.
Pratt? Were you looking for me? -Yeah, Penny.
Take it easy, relax.
l just heard a good teaching case came in.
Come on.
Let's go.
-Well, are you gonna help me out or not? -You need professional help.
You sure you're gonna be all right? We got in this fight a few days ago.
He hit me so l took off.
l was staying at my friend Laura's house.
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and he was waiting for me outside my school.
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and he made me come back home.
Then he did this.
lt's not the first time.
ls there anyone else l can call? Like an aunt or an uncle or something? -No.
-Well, what about your sister? Jen lives in San Francisco.
My dad doesn't know about it, though.
l swore l'd never tell him where she is.
He beat her so bad one time, she missed her midterms.
l think-- Ow.
l think there's something really wrong with him.
Like he can't help himself.
Well, he's not gonna be beating anyone else up.
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once the cops get through with him.
Oh, no, no.
You can't call the police.
l came here because l knew you wouldn't.
He assaulted you, Zoe.
l have to call them.
No, you don't.
lt just makes it worse.
l called them once and they didn't arrest him.
lt just made him madder.
Trust me.
They'll arrest him this time.
Well, then what? What happens when he gets out? He'll come looking for me.
Zoe.
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Can l move in with you? l have nowhere else to go.
We got an open fracture in 4.
Some sort of parasitic infection in 1 and a foreign-body inhalation.
lt looks like a roach clip, according to one of the nurses.
-l'm a little busy here.
-And we're a lot backed up out there.
lt's gonna get worse unless you start signing these.
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and a half dozen discharges waiting for your John Hancock.
-All right, l'll be there in a minute.
-Okay.
No.
-Urine looks like pea soup.
Bingo.
Send off a culture.
-Heard you had a good one for Penny.
Urosepsis.
-What's the antibiotic of choice? -Levaquin.
-Ceftriaxone.
-Okay, fine.
ln vitro, ceftriaxone might give you a better gram negative coverage.
l'll mix up a gram.
Ma'am, how you doing? -Ma'am? -She had a subarachnoid three years ago.
-So this is her baseline? -Yep.
Penny, what do you know about early goal-directed therapy of sepsis? Attempts to balance oxygen delivery with oxygen demand.
And decreases mortality through a multi-pronged approach.
She doesn't seem like a candidate for therapy.
We need to review her chart.
Talk to her primary physician.
lf we pursue goal-directed therapy, where will we start? -Get her BP up? -Right, tip of the iceberg.
We want MAP above 65, the CVP over 1 0, urine output over 5 cc an hour.
most importantly the SVC O2 above 70.
-You'll need a central line.
-With an oxygen-sensing tip.
Okay, hold up.
She can be a DNR for all we know.
-l mean, look at her.
-Well, what are you suggesting, Dr.
Pratt? l'm suggesting that we treat her conservatively.
We give her a couple of liters of saline.
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antibiotics, oxygen, and see how she does.
Well, okay, fine.
And dopamine for pressure support.
-Come on.
Dopamine? -Yes.
Dopamine.
Low dose.
Okay, l'm gonna see if l can pull an old chart.
You don't have to stay here for this.
Does that go for me too? Are you awake? Barely.
l can't sleep.
lt's difficult to sleep when you talk.
-l keep thinking about stuff.
-Then stop thinking about stuff.
Don't you wanna know what l'm thinking about? -Mm? -Uh-huh.
Yeah.
l'm thinking about what everybody's gonna say when they find out.
l think they'll be happy for you.
-Us.
-Mm-hm.
But still, l don't think we should tell anybody for a couple of weeks.
Uh.
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l might have mentioned something to my father.
You might have mentioned something to your father? He's in Croatia.
Who's he gonna tell? -You mention something to your mother? -Oh, God, no.
-l need to build up to that one.
-Ah.
l'd like to wait at least until he's in high school.
-He? -Or she.
Except l think l'd be better with a boy because the mother-daughter dynamic.
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really just scares the hell out of me.
We're gonna have a baby.
l know.
lt's so crazy.
-Where you going? -l can't sleep.
-You should sleep.
You need your rest.
-l'm too wired.
-And l want something to eat.
-Again? -Just something little like a Pop-Tart.
-No.
No more Pop-Tarts.
l'll get you something.
l'll make you some breakfast or something.
Okay, l'm coming.
l'm coming.
Sats 91 on five liters.
-Change her to a non-rebreather.
-At what point would you intubate? -Never.
-Where's Clemente? -Good question.
-Hasn't shown up.
Okay, who's the Attending? -You're looking at him.
-What? What do you want? l got a battered teen who doesn't want me to call the cops on her abusive father.
Okay.
Well, call social work.
-l don't think that's a good idea either.
-Reporting is mandatory.
Dr.
Dubenko, migraine mom is banging her head against the wall.
The Alzheimer lady is missing.
There's a homeless guy in Triage that just puked up.
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something that looks like a human finger.
And her husband is here.
Okay, okay, l'll be there in a minute.
-Could somebody locate Clemente? -l'll page him.
Mr.
Venema, l'm Dr.
Dubenko.
l've been treating your wife.
-How is she? How is she doing? -Not so good.
-How long has she been like this? -Almost three years now.
We were on the Amalfi Coast in ltaly.
She got a bad headache.
l thought it was too much wine.
By the time we found a hospital.
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ahem, she couldn't talk and she couldn't move.
She bled into her brain from an aneurysm.
-A subarachnoid hemorrhage.
-Yeah.
l thought when we got her to the hospital, she'd be all right.
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but she never woke up.
Does she ever open her eyes and look at you? No, not really.
But she knows l'm here.
lt's a shame too.
Beautiful blue eyes.
That's what got me the first time.
She caught me staring at her in math class.
You've know each other a long time.
Yeah, we started dating in '49.
Fifty-second wedding anniversary coming up in March.
Wow, congratulations.
l know she's sick.
But l'm not ready to lose her.
No, uh.
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Um, l understand, Mr.
Venema.
We'll do everything we can.
-Thank you.
-Any word on Clemente? Dude's a no-show.
Okay, set me up with a cordis introducer.
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an art line and type and cross for four units.
-Excuse me? -Set me up with a cordis introducer-- No, l heard the orders.
l just-- Are you sure you wanna do that? We're pursuing early goal-directed therapy of sepsis.
-Ever put in a subclavian line? -No, l'd like to learn.
Prep the collarbone, we'll do it.
Number 8 gloves.
You should run it by Pratt.
Attendings don't run things by residents.
-Generally, you're not the ER Attending.
-Okay.
l need to identify the junction of the median and middle third of the clavicle.
What's up? How's her pressure? What are you doing? Subclavian line.
Call the lCU for an SVC O2 catheter.
-We agreed not to do invasive procedures.
-That's her husband out there.
All right, look.
You're a surgeon and you like to cut and paste everything together.
But sometimes the best thing is not what we do, but what we don't do.
You know, she's not a DNR.
He wants everything.
Did you explain to him that she's never gonna get better? Hm? Did you explain that she has no quality of life.
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and that this bacterial infection may be nature's way of saying it's time to let go? Did he use anything to hit you with? Just his fists.
Did he, at any point, threaten to kill you? Uh, maybe.
l don't really remember.
Okay, l'm gonna take a couple Polaroids of your injuries, okay? -Okay.
-Hi, l'm Liz.
l'm with the hospital's Social Services Department.
-l didn't call you.
-Dr.
Dubenko said you needed a hand.
Dr.
Dubenko is a surgical Attending who belongs in the OR.
l'll be right back.
-Her boyfriend do that? -Father.
-Sexual? -No.
Look, l've got this covered for now.
-She have other family? -l'm working on it.
lf you can't find anyone, l'll place her in a group home.
-What? They're nightmares.
-Just till foster custody can be secured.
-What's to stop him from finding her? -She's a minor, has to go somewhere.
-Like l said, l'm working on it.
Okay? -Work fast.
l'm not leaving today until she's placed somewhere.
l sent a squad car to his office.
-l'll let you know once we get him.
-Great, thanks.
Where have you been? l watched the Weather Channel.
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sorted through the mail, cleaned some dishes.
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refilled the ice-cube trays.
-You're lucky l'm in such a good mood.
-Mm.
-And why's that? -l got the surgical elective.
Are you kidding? Wow, congratulations.
My wife, the surgeon.
And you start by next week as the new R-2.
-Get out.
-Weaver told me this morning.
l say we go to the Ritz and go and celebrate with mimosas.
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and lobster eggs Benedict.
How about we go out for dinner.
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to celebrate tonight and you go home and sleep? We're supposed to go look at that apartment.
-l'm not tired.
-Of course you're not.
l promised a buddy, Rogan, that l'd stop by, visit him at the hospital.
-He'll be disappointed if l blow him off.
-Then, go.
-We can run and see him before we leave.
-No, he's at the VA hospital.
He just got transferred from Walter Reed.
-And l haven't seen him since l left lraq.
-l'll go with you.
l wanna meet your friend.
And then you and l are gonna go and celebrate.
Okay.
l can't believe you put a central line and an art line.
-Don't look at me.
Or me.
l am just trying to give her the best chance of recovery.
Did you read her chart? What's her condition, Dr.
Pratt? Chronic vegetative state with no chance of meaningful recovery.
She can't go to the medicine floor with an art line.
So pull it.
Do it, Dr.
Pratt.
-lris scissors.
-Wait.
-l said pull it.
-l said wait.
She's not going upstairs, Dubenko.
We have limited resources in the lCU.
We treat the sickest patients who have a chance for recovery.
We don't flog people who are going to die.
-l never have enough beds as it is.
-All right, all right, fine.
l'll do it.
Dr.
Pratt, the cops brought in some guy who is asking for you.
Yo, Greg.
-What are you doing here? -Said l ran a red, but it was yellow.
He almost ran over a traffic cop and he smells like a brewery.
A bag of groceries fell off the front seat and beer bottles broke.
l can't get the smell out of my floor mats.
l need you to draw a blood alcohol for a suspected DUl.
DUl? Come-- Would you talk to him? -Look, l can vouch for this guy.
-That's great.
But l don't need you to vouch for him.
l need you to draw a BA.
ls K.
J.
around? l can't let him see me like this.
Should've thought before you started drinking and driving.
l only had two beers, l swear to God.
But what if l don't pass this? They'll bust me.
l'll lose my license.
l'll lose my job.
You gotta help me, Greg.
l've been trying damn hard.
For me, for K.
J.
lnez.
-l need you to take Darnell and Officer-- -Hollis.
Hollis, to the Suture Room for a blood draw.
Sure.
This way.
Morris.
You seen K.
J.
around? That a trick question to see if l have him washing my car? Which was one time only, okay? lt's not like he detailed it or anything, just hand wash, hand wax.
You're gonna take a Porsche through a machine service? l still gotta talk to you about my date.
What's that? A list of things l need to do before the baby comes.
-What have you got to list? -There's a lot of stuff to do.
-There's a ton of things to get.
-Baby monitor? Yeah, so you can hear the baby when you're not in the same room.
l know what it is.
This apartment isn't that big.
lf that baby's awake, you'll know it.
-Maybe it's not for this apartment.
-Well, yours is even smaller.
Sorry, but it is.
How's your breakfast? Thank God the human species has a nine-month gestation period.
Can you imagine if we were rats, and l was gonna pump this out in six weeks? -lsn't that scary? -No.
But you're scaring me.
Really? -No, come on, don't you dare.
-Don't l dare? Are you daring me? -What is it with you? -l don't know.
l don't know.
lt's like a hormonal surge.
l can't sleep, l can't stop eating, l.
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Maybe l'm nesting.
Do you think l'm.
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? No, l just think l need to get ready.
-We still have plenty of time.
-You say that, but it's gonna go fast.
l think, l don't want to jinx anything, but maybe we should look at some things.
Not to buy, but to do some comparison shopping.
-Wanna go shop? -l wanna go looking.
-Baby monitors? -Yes.
Monitors, cribs, car seats.
Maybe a little mobile of famous Croatian diplomats.
lt's a joke.
Stat D-5.
Half at 1 25 an hour.
-You took out her tubes.
-Yes.
That's a good sign.
We pulled out the invasive monitoring lines.
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because she's not going to the lntensive Care Unit.
She's getting better? The medicine must-- No, no.
She is not getting better.
Why'd you unhook her? lf she's not getting better-- The hospital has limited resources for our sickest patients.
-Resources.
-Beds, doctors, nurses-- You're talking about money.
lt can cost up to $20,000 a day to keep a patient in the lCU.
The most difficult decision we make as doctors.
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is deciding who will benefit from critical care and who will not.
And you've decided my wife won't? No, we will continue to care for your wife-- She's not worth $20,000 a day.
She will be admitted and given antibiotics.
Even though she needs a lot more than that? We will provide your wife with the care that's best for her.
But not the best care, huh? Hey, doc.
-Are you playing me here? -What? You stalling so your buddy's BA drops low enough to squeeze by? Because l can demand another doctor.
Hell, l could get a nurse to do this.
lt's nothing like that.
Like l told you, l know this guy.
Yeah, yeah.
We've established that.
Okay, look.
His son works here as a volunteer.
He's a good kid, trying to make something of himself.
How many teenage boys you know volunteer at the hospital? l don't want him seeing his father like this.
Give me a few minutes to get rid of him, then l'll do the blood draw myself.
Now, you got five minutes before l grab a nurse.
All right, deal.
All right, let's do this.
Hey, thanks for waiting, man.
l really appreciate it.
-Did you see K.
J.
? -Yeah, l sent him on a run.
All right.
All right, man.
You're gonna feel a little stick here.
-Okay.
-You need to initial the vial.
Could you hand me my pen? Thanks.
l think you're gonna like Rogan.
Crazy dude from Chicago.
Talks a mile a minute and knows more dirty jokes than anybody.
-What happened to him? -A little roadside bomb.
Took some shrapnel.
He was one of our supply-truck drivers.
Although he'd tell the female nurses that he was a terrain transport pilot.
And what did you tell the nurses? -l told them l had a girl back at home.
-Good answer.
Take it up to 3.
So where's the party, man? Mike.
l figured you'd have a nurse on each knee by now.
What, you're losing your touch? -Ahem, this is my wife, Neela.
-Hello.
l got married.
Can you believe it? And what, we did it in a day? They won't let me go back.
You're a doctor.
Can you talk to them, Mike? Can you tell them l need to go back? l need you to help me.
Yeah, man.
Whatever you need.
Whatever you need.
Okay, we have Jell-O, yogurt, soup, french fries.
-Wow.
-And ice cream.
Looks like it comes from the bottom of the healthy food pyramid.
-More like the basement.
-l'll stick with the ice cream.
Okay.
Now, l got you vanilla because the chocolate dispenser is broken so.
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That's okay.
Chocolate gives me zits.
Yeah.
lt used to be french fries for me.
Listen, Zoe.
Your father's not at work.
And the police are out looking for him.
So are you in touch with your sister? Um, yeah, we send e-mails.
l'd call her from Donna's house sometimes.
-Do you think you could stay with her? -l have no way of getting out there.
You let me deal with that.
Now, let's call Jen.
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and ask her if you can live with her, okay? You probably wish you never met me, right? No.
Although it would have been easier if l met you four or five years from now.
So crib, cradle, changing table.
Do you really need a special table for changing a baby? Why can't we change him in the crib? What? -Stroller, we need two car seats.
-Two? -Yes, one for your car, one for mine.
-Oh, right.
Oh, wait.
We need two of everything.
We need a crib for your place and a crib for my place.
-And a changing table for your place-- -l can still change him in the crib.
Yes, but what if she pees while you're changing her and soaks the mattress? Okay.
So if we have twins, we're gonna need to have four of everything? l'm not having twins.
Uh, identical twins run in my family.
-Are you kidding me? -Well, l mean, chances are really small.
lf your mutant Croatian seed causes me to have twins-- Look at the sunny side.
lf we have a custody fight.
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each one of us is gonna take a kid.
ldentical twins.
Hey, exactly the same? Got it, yeah.
Morris says he needs help with an LP.
Disimpaction is still waiting in 3.
l swear the kid in Curtain 2 looks like measles.
-My dislocated shoulder is still in the-- -Wait, wait, stop, stop, stop.
At the very least, you have to prioritize for me when it's this insane in here.
You're kidding.
lt's dead in here.
We haven't had a single trauma.
Dr.
Dubenko.
-Mr.
Venema? What's this? -lt's for my wife.
-We'll see if Morris can do some of this.
But he's not an Attending.
No, Mr.
Venema.
This isn't exactly what l meant.
You said $20,000 a day for the lCU, right? That's a check for $87,000.
lt's all l have, but it'll buy my wife four days, right? -l can't take this.
-Why not? lt's a cashier's check.
lt's not just about the money.
We can't put your wife in the lCU.
There are patients who need the lCU more than she does.
What are you saying? There's not enough money to save my wife? l'm terribly sorry, l can't take your money and there's nothing more l can do.
l need you to sign off on a diverticular abscess.
What was that all about? Nothing.
So, what's the verdict? -His blood alcohol came back negative.
-That's what l've been telling you.
l've been doing this a long time.
l'm not usually wrong about these things.
Make sure you pay that ticket.
-Thanks, man, l owe you.
-You need some help.
You did help me, man.
l appreciate it.
lt won't happen again, l promise.
lt won't because you're gonna stop drinking and get yourself in a program.
-A program? -You need some help, D.
-Look, you almost hit a cop.
-Hey, l got your truffles.
-What you doing here? -l was in the neighborhood.
-Doing what? -l asked him to stop by.
-You get something while you were out? -Yeah, l stopped by the food court.
Check in at the Admit desk.
See if they need you to make any lab runs.
l'll take that.
-l'll pick you up after work, okay? All right.
There's an AA meeting every night at the community center where Olivia works.
-Just go down there, okay? Promise me.
-All right, l will.
-All right? All right.
-Yeah.
Yo, Pratt.
Please, man, l need this.
l haven't been with a woman in months.
l'm not giving you tips on dating black chicks.
l'm not asking you because you're black.
You're the coolest guy l know.
-And you're my friend and-- -And what? lt's just not easy for me when it comes to women.
Especially once it gets going, because of my condition.
What condition? Stupidity? -l have supernumerary thelium.
-What? Morris.
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Wait.
What are you doing, man? -You got extra nipples.
-Yes.
Shh.
Red hair, porcelain skin and four nipples.
You know what gym class was like for me growing up? " Hey, Nipple Boy.
Here, here, little piggy.
Look, it's the Ugly Suckling.
" l heard them all.
-What, we don't knock? -On a curtain? -What are you doing with my patient? -Nothing.
Morris was showing me his extra nipples.
Oh, my God, l can't believe you just violated my doctor-patient privilege.
l'm not your doctor and you sure as hell ain't my patient.
Whoa, look at those.
That is freaky.
You should get them all pierced.
Wear them like chain mail.
Guys, l need your help.
l need some money.
-How much? -Whatever you got.
l'll cover it.
l walk into the supply tent one night, right? And he's filling an inflatable sex doll with helium.
l look up and there's a bunch of them already floating on the ceiling.
How or where he got them into the country, l don't even know.
But in true Rogan fashion, he recruits me.
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and we let them launch at the first light.
A dozen naked sex dolls floating out over the desert at dawn.
We're supposed to be at the apartment at 3.
Hey, man, listen.
l gotta get going, okay? Okay, Rogan? l'll swing by in a couple of days.
Why do l have to do this? Why can't you try it yourself? Here, turn around.
Just play with your toy.
Can l help you? -Oh, no, we're just looking.
-That's really cute, isn't it? Yeah.
So are you looking for a gift, or is this for you? lt's for me.
Us.
We're having a baby.
Together.
ls this going to be your first? Yeah.
lt's got two bedrooms, two underground parking spaces.
.
.
.
.
.
washer-dryer, storage facilities, and there's a workout room in the building.
You don't like it? How can l not like it? l haven't even seen it yet.
-Are you all right? -Yeah.
lf you don't think Rogan's getting the best care.
.
.
.
.
.
maybe you could arrange for one of the county neurologists to see him.
Yeah.
Um.
.
.
.
lt's not Rogan.
lt's me.
l wanna go back.
To the hospital? To lraq.
What? You're joking, right? Michael, l know it's difficult seeing your friend and those soldiers like that.
.
.
.
.
.
but going back is not gonna change what happened to them.
No, but l can help prevent other guys from ending up like that.
-Or worse.
-Okay.
We'll talk about this after you think about it.
l've already been thinking about it for weeks, Neela.
Well, without bothering to tell me? Listen, l left people over there, okay? People who need me.
Well, l need you.
Not like they do.
Oh, my God, Michael, l can't believe we're having this conversation.
-Mr.
and Mrs.
Gallant, right? -Yep.
l'm Dorothy.
Come in, come in.
You're going to love this place.
lt's perfect for newlyweds.
l understand your wife is a doctor, Michael.
That's exciting.
-What do you do? -l'm a doctor as well.
-ln the Army.
-The Army? Really? This place won't last long.
So, what do you think? Why don't you kids take your time and call me after you've talked it over? Just close the door behind you when you leave.
Wow, look at these.
lf l get this big, l think l'm gonna, like, kill myself.
Women look their most beautiful when they're pregnant.
-You're such a liar.
-No, l'm serious.
Crap.
What? lt's Debbie Dockins from the pharmacy.
Who? -Don't look.
lf she spots the two of us in a baby store.
.
.
.
.
.
holding bags, she's gonna tell everybody.
-l don't know who she is.
-She knows you.
l don't think so.
Every woman that works in the hospital knows who you are, trust me.
Okay.
Let's go.
l'm trying these on.
Her back is bothering her.
-How long are we gonna stay in here? -Just until she leaves.
When will that be? l don't know.
Shh.
-Don't " shh" me.
-Shh.
-Don't " shh" me.
We're hiding here.
-Shh.
Mmm.
-We should stop.
-No.
You started this.
-Hey, wait a minute.
Hold it.
-No, no, no.
-What are you doing? -lt's okay, Mr.
Venema.
No, it's not.
l told you not to do this.
lt's okay.
We're moving her to St.
Rafe's.
lt's a private hospital.
They've agreed to treat her sepsis.
-ln the lCU? -Yes, yes.
They have an excellent reputation and l've spoken with the Attending there.
-Who do l give my check to? -They'll bill you.
Really? Ahem.
How can l thank you? l-- Enjoy the time you have left with your wife.
You're a good doctor and a good man.
Okay, well, you should go because they're.
.
.
.
They're gonna have a lot of forms for you to fill out there.
-l hope that's homework.
-lt's not.
-You need a ride home? -No, my dad's coming to pick me up.
He said he may be running a little bit late.
He's got some meeting.
Good.
Well, it's good that he called to tell you he's gonna be late.
Thanks for helping him out today.
l saw him with the cops.
Whoa, K.
J.
, wait.
lt was a misunderstanding.
Always is.
You look like you need some help.
-l'm looking for Archie.
Oh.
Well, what was he brought in for? No, he works here.
l think he's in charge of everything.
Tamara? Hey.
-Hey.
-l'm sorry, l know l'm way early.
-No, no, it's okay.
lt's nice to finally meet you in person.
Wow, you're tall.
But, no, it's cool.
l like tall.
l'm sorry, this is my dog, Pratt.
What? lt's Greg.
Nice to meet you, Greg.
So you wanna hang out in the Doctor's Lounge while l finish up? Or l can take you on a tour of the place? -A tour would be nice.
MORRlS: Great.
Yeah but, Archie, l mean, what about your supernumerary thelium? Sounds serious.
You know? l can come back later if you've got surgery or something.
Um, no, no, it's not a patient.
lt's, uh.
.
.
.
lt's me.
l'm sorry, l don't wanna waste your time.
l should have said something earlier.
.
.
.
.
.
but l didn't wanna scare you off and it's always awkward.
What the hell.
You know, l have extra nipples.
-Okay? There, l said it.
Excuse me? Yeah.
One, two, three, four.
There you go.
Really? Yeah.
l have six toes on my left foot.
Get out.
-Let me see.
-You gonna show me your nipples? MORRlS: Ohh.
l like the way you think.
lf you need to remove your cast, any ER can do that.
There's an electronic ticket waiting for you at the airport.
lt's an Alaskan Airways flight that leaves at 7:30.
What about my clothes? What about my school? -You have the keys to your house? -Yeah.
Give them to me.
l'll pack up and send them to your sister.
Once you get to San Francisco.
.
.
.
.
.
contact your school so they can transfer your grades and stuff.
But won't my dad be able to find me? Have everything sent to me and l'll forward it.
Here's some cash for the cab.
.
.
.
.
.
and something to get you started.
-Ray, l can't take your money.
-Sure, you can.
Besides, it's nothing.
Not all of it's mine.
l convinced some of the richer docs to pitch in.
Hey, hey, hey, it's gonna be okay.
You're going to live with your sister, and Frisco is a great city.
Come with me.
Zoe, you know l can't do that.
l'll be 1 8 in three years.
Yeah, and you'll have forgotten all about me.
-No, l won't.
Zoe.
-Zoe, get in the cab.
-Zoe.
Honey, no, no, no, wait.
l just wanna talk to you.
Zoe, l just.
.
.
.
-Come on.
Open the door, l wanna talk-- -Come on, man.
-Zoe! Zoe, wait! Zoe! -She's gone.
-l'm gonna kill you.
-l don't think so.
The first one was free, pal.
Your daughter's gone and she ain't ever coming back.
lf you bother me or her again.
.
.
.
.
.
l'll have to use my extensive medical knowledge to mess you up real bad.
You got that? l thought you joined the Army so that they'd pay for medical school.
l did.
l did.
And you put your time in.
Yes, l put my time in, but there's more to it.
More to what? Look, Neela, l don't expect you to understand-- Then explain it to me, Michael, because l really want to understand this.
Something happens over there.
l just-- l had a purpose over there.
My life had some clarity.
-l just cannot abandon those guys.
-But you can abandon me? Look, l understand there's a camaraderie with those you serve with.
And l respect that, l do.
lf you still feel the need to experience that.
.
.
.
.
.
you can volunteer at the VA hospital.
lt's not the same thing.
Neela, there is a war going on.
People might like to forget that, but l can't.
And l can't live with myself if l don't go back.
Well, then we'll both go.
l'll volunteer with an NGO or something.
Neela, it is too dangerous over there.
lt's too dangerous for me, but it's okay for you? -What a load of crap.
-l am a soldier, remember? And you're also a husband, remember that? You asked me to marry you.
You looked into my eyes and asked me to be your wife.
.
.
.
.
.
and to share a life together.
We took vows, Michael.
l mean, what the hell was all that? A whim? That was not a whim.
l thought l could do this, Neela.
l thought of nothing else but coming home and making a life with you.
And l have tried to make it work, but l just.
.
.
.
l just can't stay here, knowing what's going on over there.
Neela, l am sorry.
And you.
.
.
.
You know how much that l love you.
You know, if you did.
.
.
.
.
.
you wouldn't do this.
And if you loved me, you would understand that l have to.
Yeah, well, maybe that's the problem.
l love you, but l still don't know you.