11.22.63 (2016) s01e01 Episode Script

The Rabbit Hole

1 [mysterious music.]
The day that changed my life.
The day that changed my life wasn't a day but a night.
It was Halloween night.
I was Buffalo Bob, and I had the real cowhide vest.
It was 1960, and I lived in Holden, Kentucky.
I loved Zagnut bars, and my sister Ellen loved Baby Ruth bars.
My brother Tuggah loved everything.
I don't love Halloween anymore.
It was the night my mom, my brother, and my sister was murdered [screams.]
With a hammer.
[woman screams.]
I remember the blood smelled like pennies.
[breathing heavily.]
My father killed everyone but me.
I don't like to remember it, but I can't forget it.
The end.
I know it isn't very long.
Harry, that that's a powerful story.
Thank you for sharing that with us.
Now, why was this good? Because when we heard it, we knew him.
It was honest.
What Harry wrote was very painful.
The truths probably made us all feel a little uncomfortable.
Because of that, it was It was very powerful.
Let me see that.
Boom.
- [applause.]
- Good job.
- Good job.
- [indistinct chatter.]
Thanks.
Bye.
See you.
Harry, hey, that was That was something.
I never got an A+ before.
Well, congratulations.
Can I ask you a question? Yeah.
I'm going for a promotion.
Can you write a letter to the principal? Only if you promise to give me a raise as soon as you're running this place.
- Yeah.
- All right, see you.
Bet you got it all planned right Bet you never worry Never even feel a fright Bet you got it all planned right Never fit to worry Never even feel a fright.
Single sleeps alone [sizzling.]
[music continues in background.]
There's not a Pilates class in the world is going to help you if you keep eating like that.
- Thanks for worrying about my ass.
- [laughs.]
Why don't you put a diet burger on the menu? I do make a diet burger.
It's called a salad.
Right.
"His eyes were like two round, blue circles with another black circle in the middle"? Well, you know, every once in a while, you get a young Ernest Hemingway, don't you? Every once in a while, someone gives me a $10 tip.
Hmm.
We both have a lot to look forward to.
- Hey, Christy.
- Hi.
How are you? You look good.
Thank you, Al.
- Want a bite? - It's $1.
25.
That can't be real beef.
You're missing out.
I wrote to Helene when I heard about your dad.
Did you get a chance to talk to him before? He died when I was on the plane to see him.
I'm sorry.
There's three sets to sign.
One for you, one for me, and one for the lawyer.
Need a pen? I signed already.
Right.
Always prepared.
You doing any writing these days? Nope.
I always loved your writing.
There you go.
Believe it or not, I wish you all the best.
Christy.
I wish you the best too.
[door opens.]
[footsteps departing.]
[door closes.]
[coughing.]
Al? Get out of here.
[coughs.]
Al, you all right? Just go home.
Are you okay? [grunts.]
Jesus Christ.
What happened to you? [coughing.]
I'm fine.
You're not fine.
You look like crap.
Go on.
[coughs.]
What the hell's going on? What happened to you? Ah, shit.
Al, Al, Al! [coughing.]
Maybe you should take one of those pills the doctor gave you so you can get some sleep.
I'll start calling the numbers on that list of in-home nurses.
Just forget it.
I don't need a nurse.
[coughs and sighs.]
I don't get it.
One minute you're okay; the next minute you're not.
I Why didn't you tell me? Just leave everything.
I'm fine.
[coughing.]
You sound fine.
Now, you want to tell me what the fuck is going on? You heard what's going on.
It's cancer.
Al, you got You got cancer in five minutes? Oh, I'm tired.
Do me a favor.
[coughs.]
Close the door on your way out.
[mysterious music.]
Come over tomorrow, and I'll explain.
I'll explain everything.
[music continues.]
Go home.
[coughs.]
Male Narrator: In the 1930s, researchers began experimenting with a number of so-called shock therapies meant to reroute the circuitry of the diseased brain [laughs.]
Narrator: Patients were brought to the breach of death Cody.
What the fuck? Narrator: Through an intentional overdose of the hormone insulin.
Others were given All right, real quick.
Why do we think the filmmakers chose to document these conditions? Narrator: If you look at the patient writings after this People tend to think the important stories are wars, elections, political movements, but these people matter.
Little things matter.
[bell rings.]
All right, I'll see you tomorrow.
Bye, Carrie.
Bye.
- Cody? - Yeah? What's holding your attention on this little screen? Uh, here, look.
I don't care, I love it I don't care I could send you the clip if you want it.
Yeah, you do that.
On the summer day when you were gone I crashed my car into [coughs.]
All right, here we are.
[coughs.]
How long have we known each other? 10, 12 years.
Yeah, yeah, yeah.
[coughs.]
You trust me? Not really.
Well, I'm gonna tell you something that's gonna seem crazy.
Okay.
But before I do, I need you to go in this closet.
Just go in there and take a look around.
Stay as long as you need, and then come back.
Then I'll tell you everything.
You want me to go in the closet, look around, spend as much time as I need? - I know I sound batshit, okay? - Yeah.
But I thought about this, and it'll just be simpler if you go in, like I'm asking.
Go in the closet? Can you do me a goddamn favor and just walk into the fucking closet? - Fine.
- [coughing.]
I'm going, okay? Relax.
All right, going in the closet.
Better not be any spiders in here.
Take a few steps forward.
Yeah.
If I feel any cobwebs on my face Just keep on.
I can't see anything.
Just go a few more steps.
You want me to keep going? Yep.
Whoa! [grunts.]
[indistinct chatter.]
I got it! - [grunts.]
- [groans.]
Man! [chatter continues.]
[train whistle blows.]
Oh, for the love of Mike.
["Stay Just a Little Bit Longer" by Maurice Williams.]
[laughter.]
Just a little bit longer [indistinct chatter.]
You shouldn't be here.
You shouldn't be here.
Do you hear me? Huh? You shouldn't be here! What the fuck was that? That was October 21, 1960.
No, it wasn't.
Now you understand why I needed you to go in there.
What are you saying? What are you saying, this is a Hard to find the right words, I know.
But you go through there, and it's 1960.
You're saying this is a time portal? I call it a rabbit hole.
How long has it been there? Since I had the diner.
Who else knows about it? Just you.
If I told anyone else about it, they might try to stop me.
They'd try to stop you? What are you talking about? Al, why did you show this to me? I need you to do what I couldn't.
I need you to go back there to prevent the assassination of John F.
Kennedy.
You heard about the butterfly effect? - Yeah.
- All right.
Do you think that if JFK lived, Robert Kennedy would've run for president, seriously? It's doubtful.
So, if Bobby doesn't run, that means no Sirhan Sirhan at the Ambassador Hotel in 1968.
Save JFK, save his brother.
And that's what I mean about the butterfly effect.
Then there's Vietnam.
Uh, okay, so if you save JFK, then there's no Vietnam? Johnson was the one who escalated everything in Nam.
If Kennedy had survived, no way does that escalation continue.
Those boys would've lived.
Al, I get it, but changing the past to make it how you think it should be just seems You think Vietnam unfolded exactly as it should have, that recent American history was just hunky-dory? Saving JFK is a theory.
You don't know what it's gonna change! You know what I know? You save Kennedy's life, you make the world a better place.
God damn it! Al.
Don't you want to do any fucking thing that matters? I'm just saying you don't have any proof.
You don't know that what you do in the past is gonna change anything here.
Go see.
You check for yourself.
What do you want Y-you want me to go stab someone? No, Jake.
There's a tree out there.
Carve something in it.
Jesus Christ.
Oh, God damn.
Fucking Goddamn [groans.]
Stupid thing.
I hate the fucking dark.
[indistinct chatter.]
Hey, batter, batter! [grunts.]
[train whistle blows.]
[chatter continues.]
Oh, for the love of Mike.
[girls laughing.]
You shouldn't be here.
[mysterious music.]
- I want to tell you something.
- Back off, okay? [dramatic music.]
Next time you go through, that carving won't be there.
Why? Each time you go in, everything resets.
It's always 11:58 on October 21, 1960.
You saw how everything looked exactly the same? Yeah.
No matter how long you stay Three weeks, three years When you come back, only two minutes will have passed here.
Two minutes? Who makes up these rules? I'm just explaining that, if you want to change something forever, you can't ever go back.
Going back erases what you did before.
All right, who's the guy with the hat and the yellow card? He's some bum.
Well, he got up in my face.
I mean, he seemed to be the only one that noticed me come and go.
Just forget the yellow card man.
He's not important.
What's important is that we have a chance here.
A chance to change people's lives.
I saw you sitting there with Christy, and I knew you could do this.
What are you talking about? That's the last time I went through.
Stayed about About two years.
Two years? While I signed my divorce papers? - That was - Two minutes, yeah.
It doesn't make any sense.
It doesn't make any sense.
Jake, the way the world is now doesn't make any sense.
Just think about it, eh? You know how to think, don't you? [chuckles, coughs.]
Marisol Breslin.
[applause.]
Congratulations, Marisol.
Hector de la Fuente.
[applause.]
That idiot always schedules these goddamn things on a Friday.
Maureen Kelly.
We can't send diplomas in the mail? [chuckles.]
How long have you worked here, Alice? I went here.
Wow.
Harry Dunning! Harry! All right.
Harry! - [announces name.]
- He's a great writer.
I'll look for his work in "The New Yorker.
" Did you get my recommendation? Listen, you love Harry.
I love Harry.
We all love Harry.
He's great at pushing a broom, but at management, making a schedule, signing time sheets, no way.
All these graduates are starting new lives! Yeah! [applause.]
That's it.
I'm off the clock.
Let's hear it for all our adult education graduates for all their hard work.
[poignant music.]
[knock on door.]
[stirring music.]
All right.
Tell me more.
[chuckles.]
Come here.
Holy shit.
I thought you didn't have any hobbies.
Who do you think killed Kennedy? People seem to think it was Lee Harvey Oswald.
Yeah.
You know, in a conspiracy with the mafia, CIA, FBI, the Russians, babushka lady on the grassy knoll.
Lot of books written about it.
Most of them written about Lee Harvey Oswald.
Guy doesn't make sense.
U.
S.
Marine, defected to Russia, came back, but everyone who wrote about Oswald studied him after the assassination.
I saw him before.
I saw him when he came back from Russia.
In 1962.
What the hell are you staring at? - Nothing.
- Yeah, well, mind your own.
Why didn't you shoot him right there? I don't know whether Oswald was the man who did it, and I still don't know.
Not gonna shoot someone because of maybe.
There are hundreds of questions that haven't been answered concerning Oswald and that day.
This is a this is a big one.
Who's this? Walker.
Ran for Texas governor.
You know that in 1963, six months before Kennedy was shot, there was an assassination attempt on this man? Okay.
Bullet came from a 6.
5 caliber Carcano rifle.
Same exact make of gun that killed Kennedy.
Well, did you go back and see Oswald shoot at Walker? - That's what I want you to do.
- How? I want you to make it to April 10th, 1963.
And if Oswald fires that gun alone, you got to take him out.
Hold on, what are we even talking about here? We're talking about seeing if Oswald took a shot at Walker.
I go back through the rabbit hole, I come out in 1960.
You want me to hang out for three years? - Two minutes here.
- What am I gonna do in 1960? I'm nothing there.
How am I gonna How am I gonna live? I'm glad you asked.
[grunts.]
What's this? Treasure chest? James Amberson? See, you can still answer to Jake if you want.
This is for me? You're welcome.
Social security card, birth certificate, charge cards.
Everything you need to hold a job, blend in.
Al, when did you do this? I got diagnosed in 1962.
You made all this when you were back there? Here's the most important thing.
[sighs.]
Sports stats? Yeah, baseball and boxing mostly.
This is how you survived? You spent all your time back there gambling? That, and there was a butcher I liked on Main Street.
How do you think I keep my prices here so low? That's what you've been feeding me? I've been eating hamburgers from 1960? Yeah.
[laughs.]
[coughing.]
Al [sighs.]
I don't know who you think I am.
I just don't think I'm the right guy for this.
I know you are.
That's about all I know.
You'll figure out the rest when you get there.
Let's let's go.
Go where? To the diner.
I'll watch you go through.
I can wait two minutes.
Two minutes to get a better world.
[chuckles.]
I have to think about all this.
What's there to think about? [sighs.]
Okay? Hm.
Yeah.
Oh, yeah.
And what a waste of fucking time.
What? I can see how this is gonna go.
"Oh, my car needs an oil change.
" "Got to give a Give a big test.
" "Got to go take a nap.
" Anything to avoid doing something real in your life.
Al, this is I've been up all night listening to fucking crazy I thought maybe for once This is fucking crazy! You might do something, not just talk about it.
Just because you wasted your life on this, it doesn't mean that I have to.
You little shit.
Get the fuck out of my house.
Get out.
[engine starts.]
[dark music.]
[sighs.]
[dark music.]
[sighs.]
Al? Al? Sorry about last night.
Couldn't sleep.
Al? [solemn music.]
Shit.
[sighs.]
[solemn music.]
Okay, buddy.
I'll see you in two minutes.
[suspenseful music.]
[alarm chirps.]
[suspenseful music.]
Here I go.
[chatter.]
[whistle blows.]
[chatter continues.]
Careful.
["Stay Just a Little Bit Longer" by Maurice Williams.]
[girls laughing.]
Shouldn't be here.
Keep telling you, you shouldn't be here.
Well, I'm here.
Stay with me Whoa-oh-oh, yeah Just a little bit longer Please! Please, please, please, please Tell me you're going to Come on, come on, come on, and - Stay! - Yeah, yeah, yeah Come on, come on, come on, stay whoop! La-de-dah, come on, come on, come on and stay ['60s garage rock.]
[children chattering.]
La la la la La la la la la La la la la la la la la la la La la la la La la la la la La la la la la la la When I saw her on the corner You'll need to blend in, so get your hair cut and get rid of the stuff on your face.
It's not gonna work.
Looks like you're overdue.
Yeah, I guess so.
From out of town? Uh, yes.
James Amberson.
- Amberson? - Mm-hmm.
Are those the Ambersons over in Castle Rock? No.
You know, my wife's cousin married an Amberson, but he was from New Hampshire.
Those are your people? Actually, I was adopted.
Huh.
['60s garage rock continues.]
La la la la La la la la la La la la la Get the right clothes.
Back then grown men wore suits and hats.
When I vote, it comes down to character.
- Mm-hmm? - Richard Nixon has it.
You look at him, you think "that's a good man.
" Yeah.
Perfect.
Cash or credit, sir? Oh, uh, cash.
Can I have a hat too, please? Certainly.
Thanks.
La la la la La la la la la La la la la la la la la la la La la la la La la la la la La la la la la la la Hey, food tastes better.
Man, everything tastes better.
Mmm.
['60s garage rock continues.]
[laughs softly.]
I guess you liked it.
That is the best pie that I've ever had.
[laughs.]
It's insane.
Um I hope that's a good thing.
Yeah, yeah, insanely good.
That'll be $0.
60.
$0.
60? Okay, of course.
[chuckles.]
Hey, keep the change.
Oh, thank you.
I'll tell my mother you liked her pie, mister Mr.
Amberson.
Yeah, thank you, uh Alice.
You're Alice.
Oh, my God.
Something the matter? Do you go to South Lisbon High? Yeah, I just graduated.
And you're gonna teach there, right? Heck no.
After this summer I'm moving to Bangor.
- Oh.
- And then after that? - New York.
- Hmm.
My mother doesn't know yet.
Right, well, good luck with that.
Thank you.
Do me a favor, just try to stay sweet.
Okay.
Maybe I'll see you around.
["Happy Go Lucky Me" by Paul Evans.]
I can laugh When things ain't funny Ha-ha-ha-happy go lucky me Yeah, I can smile When I ain't got no money Ha-ha-ha-happy go lucky me Get a neutral, reliable, boring car.
There's a lot on Maple Street.
I got a deal on a '54 Chevy.
Need to make your money last.
Me and my filly Well, we both share [whistles.]
A slappy-go-happy, happy go lucky love Well, life is sweet, whoa-oh-oh You a buyer or a looker? Looker.
Honey of a car.
Oh, yeah.
You want to know, this thing drives like a horse afire.
Oh, I bet.
Bought it from Arlene Keagan over in Durham after her husband died.
- From out of town, am I right? - Yeah.
Andy Carson.
Jake Amberson.
- So, how much? - $750.
$750? [laughs.]
What would you say if I said $650 cash? Mr.
Amberson, make it $700 you got yourself a deal.
Deal.
Young lady in the office will write the sale up for you.
I'll put on a sticker and a 14-day plate.
Sticker'll be another $5.
All right, you got me.
Yeah.
Uh, hey, Andy? Kind of cleans me out.
You happen to know any place around here a guy might place a bet? A little more than a friendly wager? ["Happy Go Lucky" continues.]
[laughs.]
[laughs.]
It may sound silly But I don't care I got the moonlight, I got the sun I've got the stars above Me and my filly Well, we both share A slappy-go-happy, happy go lucky love Well, life is sweet, whoa-oh-oh, yeah Sweet as honey Ha-ha-ha-happy go lucky me [laughs.]
Ha-ha-ha-happy go lucky me There you go, chicken.
It's on the house.
Hey, guy down at the car lot said this was a place somebody could make a wager.
Not from around here, are you? No, uh James Amberson.
I'm in town on a little business.
I'm gonna be here for a while.
What are you looking to make a bet on? Fight of the week, Sanchez versus Jofre.
Jofre to win.
3 to 1 odds.
3 to 1? That's it? Yeah, that's it.
Want to make it interesting? Name the round.
Okay.
What if I said Jofre'll knock him out in sixth round? Ah, I'd say 35 to 1.
Wow.
35 to 1? Hell, I'll make that bet.
Hey.
You want to take 35 to 1? Do it, Sam.
Okay.
You got a bet.
- Oh, yeah? - Yeah.
Well, great.
Uh How about $100? $100? Or you know, whatever.
I'll cover that bet.
You will? What's the name? James Amberson.
My friends call me Little Eddie.
Little Eddie? Let me buy you a drink.
We can listen together.
Male announcer: Buster Henderson yelling instructions from Jofre's camp, but Jofre can't seem to get up.
- 30 seconds to go - You got him, you got him.
- Come on, buddy.
- Come on.
Announcer: Grazing shot, Jofre's still walking, stalking forward.
Jofre still game, still carries the big bomb, still can unleash that heavy leather, but Sanchez is tossing Doesn't look too good for your man Jofre.
- Yeah, I can hear.
- Announcer: Ladies and gentlemen, we are seeing Jofre turn it around.
- A flurry of uppercuts.
- What? Beautiful shots all the way.
- What are you doing? - Here he comes.
Come on, buddy.
Come on, Jofre! - Sanchez is stunned! - Get up! - Get up! - Get up off the canvas.
Sanchez, flat on his back.
Wait, he's getting up - Oh! - Announcer: No! - Sanchez is down! - Get up! - Get up! - Five, six, seven, eight - Yeah! - Nine - All right! - The fight is over! The fight is over! Jofre has knocked out Sanchez! Nobody saw this coming! Was that the sixth round? [stirring music.]
You won.
Yeah.
Did you just win a 35 to 1 bet? Yeah.
Guess I'm lucky.
Guess so.
All right, thank you, Little Eddie.
Count it.
No, it's okay.
I trust you.
Count it.
Make sure it's all there.
Okay.
That looks like it's all there.
$3,600.
Okay, well, I should get going, but I really appreciate the bet, so He appreciates the bet.
[laughs.]
Enjoy your time in Lisbon.
Maybe I'll see you guys around.
[suspenseful music.]
Hey, nice wheels.
Thanks.
[engine starts.]
See ya.
[suspenseful music.]
Welcome to the Tamarack Motor Court.
I need a room, do you have one? Okeydoke.
Okay.
[indistinct TV chatter.]
$5.
All right.
Room eight's ready for you.
Thank you.
You're being paranoid.
Okay, people make bets all the time.
Those guys, they win and lose every night.
All right? You're being paranoid.
[car approaching.]
Oh, no.
Oh, no.
Oh, no.
Shit.
[door closes.]
[suspenseful music.]
["I Love It" by Icona Pop playing.]
I crashed my car into the bridge I watched I let it burn I threw your shit into a bag And pushed it down the stairs I crashed my car into the bridge I don't care, I love it [grunts.]
[dramatic music.]
[tires screeching.]
Jesus Christ! [tires squeal.]
[grunts.]
["Road Runner" by Bo Diddley.]
I'm a road runner, honey And you can't keep up with me Beep, beep I'm a road runner, honey And you can't keep up with me Beep, beep Come on, let's race Baby, baby, you will see Here I come Beep, beep Mm.
Move over, honey Let me by [laughs.]
Move over, baby Let this man by Hi! I'm gonna show you, baby Look out your head Gonna put some dirt in your eye Here I go ["Road Runner" continues.]
Oh, yeah, how am I doing? You's going the wrong way, sir.
Beep beep ["Road Runner" continues.]
Take my hand, baby I'm gonna prove to you that I'm a A road running man I wanna show you something That I'm the fastest in the land Now, let me by Beep beep Oh, yeah You said you fast Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha But it don't look like you gonna last Good-bye I've got to put you down [eerie music.]
[girls scream.]
Oh, Jesus Christ.
You okay? You all right? Excuse me.
- Sorry, sorry.
- Oh.
- Greta, you're okay? - Yes.
Okay, say a prayer, let's move along.
Move along, girls.
Move along.
Sorry.
[laughs.]
You were clearly outnumbered.
Exactly, that's why I had to stand my ground.
Well, good for you.
You got something against Catholics? [laughs.]
Uh, Miss? Miss, you left this.
Thank you.
I forget everything when I'm reading.
Me, too.
One time I was 12 and I was reading "Of Mice and Men" on the bus and missed every stop.
Admit it, you cried.
"Of Mice and Men"? Like a baby.
Well, last month, I was reading a Chandler novel and I lost my other handbag, so thank you.
- Got to stop doing that.
- [laughs.]
"From Here to Eternity.
" Which do you like better, the book or the movie? Please.
The book's always better.
Everybody knows that.
Yeah how 'bout "The Manchurian Candidate"? Is that a film? I know the book.
No, it's not, but maybe they'll make one someday.
Then maybe I'll change my mind.
Yeah.
Sadie Clayton.
Hi, Jake, uh, Amberson.
[car horn honks.]
Well, thank you for coming to the rescue, Mr.
Amberson.
Yeah.
My husband would kill me if I lost another handbag.
Right.
[wistful music.]
No ladies in your room after 7:00, and this'll be the common room.
You may enjoy it any time you like.
Breakfast and supper are included in the weekly rate.
This is my son Henry.
- Hello.
- Sir.
Doing your homework.
Good boy.
Now, how did you find us? Was it the sign outside? No, actually a friend told me about this place.
Al Templeton? He stayed here.
I don't recall anybody by that name.
Oh, my mistake.
What brings you to Dallas, Mr.
Amberson? Doing research for a book that I'm writing.
Oh, a writer? It's perfect.
Supper's at 6:00.
Thanks.
All right.
[sighs.]
Do your homework.
You need to be prepared for what's to come.
I've put everything I know into those files.
You're gonna feel apart from other people.
That doesn't go away.
But tread lightly.
Don't get too close to anyone.
It never ends well.
You see, the past doesn't want to be changed.
There are times when you feel it push back, you know? You feel it.
When you're close to changing something, it's hard to describe, but you'll know.
If you do something that really fucks with the past, the past fucks with you.
[train horn blowing in distance.]
[train passing.]
[dark music.]
[buzzing.]
Operator.
Hi, can you give me the number for a Christopher Epping in Chicago, Illinois? $0.
35.
Connecting to Christopher Epping [line distorting.]
[intense buzzing.]
Hello? Hello? - What? - Hello, hello? - Dad? - Can you hear me? Dad? [muffled voice, static.]
Dad? [buzzing, muffled voice.]
Are you there? [static crackling.]
[sighs.]
[car accelerating.]
[dramatic music.]
Oh, my God.
You shouldn't be here.
He argued with Mr.
Khrushchev in the kitchen, it is true, pointing out that while we may be behind in space, we were ahead in color television.
Freedom is not communism.
[dark music.]
[knock at door.]
- Mr.
Amberson? - Yeah? - Are you all right? - Yeah, I'm fine.
Can I get you anything? No, it's okay.
I'm I'm okay.
[dark music.]
Oh, Mr.
Amberson, you had me worried last night.
I'm sorry about that.
Oh, don't be sorry.
I'm glad you're feeling better.
Let me make you some fresh coffee.
Please.
Good morning, sir.
Good morning.
How old are you? I'm 14, sir.
You headed to the Army? Soon as I turn 18.
Mind if I ask why? Because I want to serve my country, sir.
Okay.
Henry, don't eat with your fingers.
Here you go.
- Thank you.
- You're welcome.
Oswald doesn't get back from Russia for two years.
And in 1963, somebody shoots at General Walker.
In the meantime, there are plenty of other leads to follow.
On October 26th, follow George.
Just go where he goes, then you'll understand.
Who the hell is George? That tastes like snot.
Yeah.
George de Mohrenschildt, Russian expat.
He's educated, charming, rich, belongs to the Dallas Petroleum Club, and in 1962, he becomes Lee's best friend.
We heard there was a couple, moved here from Russia, and they were having a very bad time, financially, and so I went to see them.
Tell me, Jake, why is this guy hanging out in Lee's shitty apartment? They're swingers? [laughs.]
Lee had taken the cigarette from her and had put it out on her shoulder.
If Oswald had a handler, it was him.
All right, hold on.
You lost me.
A handler? What what does that mean? George told Oswald to shoot Kennedy? If Lee was set up, then George was the only guy who could've done it.
You need to cross off that possibility.
All right, and if I do that, then what? Then you kill Oswald.
[tense music.]
[engine starts.]
[engine starts.]
[stirring music.]
Where the hell are you going, George de Morenfuck? [indistinct shouting.]
[indistinct chatter.]
[indistinct chatter.]
[cheers and applause.]
Lyndon Johnson and I do not promise a life of ease.
We cannot promise a solution to the problems which disturb our lives.
But we can promise that if we are successful, we shall move with vigor and vitality on the problems which disturb us here and around the world.
Thomas Paine [applause.]
Thomas Paine, in the revolution of 1776 - Isn't he wonderful? Yes.
- Yeah.
Said that the cause of America is the cause of all mankind.
I think in the revolution of 1960 that the cause of all mankind is the cause of America.
And as we move ahead, we think not only of the City of Dallas and the City of Boston, the State of Massachusetts and the State of Texas, the United States.
We think of all those who wish to join us in a great effort around the world to maintain their freedom and maintain the peace.
We ask your help in this campaign.
Give us your voice.
Give us your help.
Join with us in this effort to move this country ahead.
[cheers and applause.]
[patriotic drumming.]
[Frank Sinatra singing "High Hopes".]
Everyone is voting for Jack 'Cause he's got what all the rest lack Just checking in.
Everyone wants to back Jack Jack is on the right track 'Cause he's got high hopes Uh, Al Templeton.
I don't see that name here.
Oh, I'm a guest of George de Mohrenschildt.
He doesn't like my name on any lists.
I assure you he'll be very upset if I don't make this appointment.
Vote for Kennedy Thank you.
Kennedy, he just keeps rolling a Kenney, he just keeps rolling a Kennedy, he just keeps rolling along Yes, a little bit.
I'll take one of those.
Vote for Kennedy! Your suit collar looked lonely.
Oh, then you should give me two.
You like working for the campaign? I think Senator Kennedy is the one person who's really, really gonna make a difference.
Yeah.
Oh, could I get one? Of course.
Oh, thank you.
- Oh, look, Jackie's here.
- There she is.
- Mrs.
Kennedy! - Mrs.
Kennedy, a photo, please? - [crowd chattering.]
- One more.
- Mrs.
Kennedy? - Mrs.
Kennedy! Jackie, Jackie.
[laughs.]
Hey, you shouldn't be here.
Oh, no, I'm just waiting for George.
Yeah, just come with me, okay? Oh, no it's okay.
Oh! Let's go.
Stop him! [dramatic music.]
- Over there! - Hey, hey, hey, stop! [buzzing.]
Going that way! [men shouting.]
[tense music.]
[suspenseful music.]
[buzzing.]
- [men shouting.]
- I don't know, I don't see him! He's got to be in here! [neon buzzing.]
.]
[suspenseful music.]
Aah! Aah! [grunting.]
Aah! [moans.]
Wakey, wakey, sunshine.
Let's go.
[groans.]
James Amberson from Maine.
- Yeah.
- Pretty far from home.
Yeah, I just came to see the president.
I mean, senator Kennedy.
Well, you scammed your way into the senator's VIP room.
There are people out there who don't like the Kennedy campaign.
Well, that's not me.
I love the guy.
Well, why did you give a fake ID? And then run away? That looks bad.
I'm not interested in spending the rest of the night in this basement.
Who are you? Why were you in the VIP room? Why are you here? - Is he still here? - Who? JFK, uh Jack is on the right track.
I'm gonna be honest with you guys.
I came out here to shake the man's hand.
I just think he is the best that this country has to offer, all right? Get ready for greatness.
And that speech? Did you hear? You heard it, right? I mean, you heard that speech.
I-I just wanted to tell him face-to-face that I am a believer.
Do you know what I'm talking about? Shut up, for the love of God.
Do you know what I'm talking about? Just shut up, shut up.
I mean, can you blame me for wanting to tell the guy I'm gonna vote for that I'm a believer? You can't arrest me for enthusiasm, right? There's no law against that.
Actually, you're wrong about that.
And if I catch your enthusiastic ass near Kennedy's campaign again, we'll bring you up on charges.
Don't go places you're not invited.
Okay, right.
Um Will you just do one thing for me? Just tell him that I'm his number one fan.
Will you do that? Sure.
Thank you, all right, thank you.
Okay, see you later.
So George de Mohrenschildt might be an informant, might work for Russia.
He's got interests in Haiti, pals around with Duvalier; who knows what else.
He told a reporter in 1977 that it was the CIA who gave him Oswald's address.
And then he was asked to testify in front of the House Committee on Assassinations.
Next day? He committed suicide.
Supposedly.
I followed him while I could in 1960.
And there was one night One night I realized was actually an important night.
Because I felt the past push back.
[suspenseful music.]
He took his wife Jean out to dinner at El Conejo.
[indistinct shouting.]
All the movers and shakers in Dallas ate there.
Best Tex-Mex place in town.
First thing I felt was an argument outside the restaurant got out of hand.
Don't get drawn in.
You need to get the hell out of the way.
[chatter, laughter.]
His wife goes off to the bar and he heads into the restaurant alone.
- May I take your coat, sir? - No, it's fine, thank you.
[mariachi music.]
The fella out front is gonna say, "No tables available.
" Sorry, sir, without reservation we won't be able to So have cash.
Oh, I think I can help you.
Can I take your coat, please? No, it's fine, but may I have that table right there so I can be close to the band? Of course.
[speaking Spanish.]
- Thank you very much.
- You're very welcome.
This is where you want to be careful, because one minute, I was walking down the stairs, and the next, I was on fire.
Sent me to the hospital, and it kept me from following de Mohrenschildt all the way into the restaurant.
I never got to see who he met with.
Oh! Be careful.
Are you okay? I'm so sorry, señor.
Yeah, I'm fine.
- Your coat.
- Yeah, just leave it.
- Are you sure? - Yeah, it's okay.
Once you're past the fire, I can't help you anymore.
You're on your own.
[electricity zaps, people scream.]
Oh, my God.
[concerned chatter.]
I'm so sorry.
Are you okay? - Are you okay? - I don't know what's going on tonight.
I'm so sorry.
[chatter.]
We'll clean that up right away.
Maestro, musica.
[playing mariachi music.]
Your table.
I'm so sorry.
Could I get you a cocktail? It's on the house.
- Oh, uh margarita.
- Right away.
Of course, I've always admired Allen Dulles.
None of this, you understand, is completely on the books.
[muffled speech.]
A man like me wants his life to matter.
Señor, here's your margarita, and are you ready to place your order for your first I'll order later.
Of course, señor, may I make a suggestion of the special? - Late, later, not hungry now.
- Of course, señor, of course.
Take your time.
It's a short list.
Just a couple guys we'd like to know a little bit more about.
We've been instructed by Langley to meet with prospective assets such as yourself.
[whirring loudly.]
[laughter.]
[clears throat.]
He's still angry about Stalin seizing his estates.
Antonov, no.
Belinsky sometimes complains about the U.
S.
but knows he has it good.
Lee Harvey Oswald? [loud crash.]
He's a nobody.
[mariachi music.]
I'll let you know what I learn.
We'll be in contact.
No one knows when George first met with the CIA.
But the CIA recruited him.
This we know.
[mariachi music.]
What we don't know is if George recruited Oswald to kill Kennedy.
[heavy breathing.]
- Oh! - Oh! I'm sorry.
I-I'm sorry.
[mariachi music.]
Holy shit, that was the CIA.
That was the Goddamn CIA.
You were right, Al.
[indistinct shouting.]
Oh, my God.
Oh, my God.
[overlapping shouting.]
[indistinct shouting.]
[fire raging.]
Aah! - No, stop.
- No, all my stuff is in there.
Stop, just stop.
No, no, no! Help him! Henry! Oh, why? Oh, how can My son! [sobbing.]
[intense music.]
[coughs.]
[coughs.]
[poignant music.]
Oh, shit.
Shit, shit, shit.
[footsteps approaching.]
Sir, you shouldn't be here.
Yeah, know what, you're right.
I shouldn't be here.
I can't do this.
There are beds available down at the shelter.
No, I'm done.
I'm going back to Maine.
Everyone wants to back Jack Jack is on the right track 'Cause he's got high hopes He's got high hopes 1960's the year For his high hopes [cow mooing in distance.]
[groans.]
The day that changed my life wasn't a day, but a night.
It was Halloween night.
It was the night my father murdered my mom and my brother and my sister with a hammer and hurt me bad.
It was 1960.
I lived in Holden, Kentucky.
Hey, mister.
You lost? How far is Holden? Yeah, turn around.
Head south down Route 13 for about 30 miles.
Not much of a town, though.
Why'd you want to go there? 'Cause I might be able to do one thing.
Thank you very much.
[children chattering.]
[gun clicks.]
Bang, got you, you're dead.
Come on, Ellen, now you're dead.
Aah! Ellen, for goodness sakes, turn down the drama.
The neighbors are gonna think someone's dying over here.
[car horn honks.]
Daddy! Hey, don't suppose any of you kids want any ice cream, do you? - Both: I do! - You do? Come here! [smooches.]
Come here, Buster.
All right, let's get in there.
You guys in the back.
You're looking beautiful, Doris.
Have them home by 6:00.
Come on, Harry.
What, you don't like ice cream? Come here, you.
Come here, you.
[both laughing.]
You're going in the front.
You're going in the front.
You're going in the window.
Get in there, get in there.
[engine starts.]
[dramatic music.]
["Strange Things Happening" by Etta James.]
Well, you stay out late at night You don't treat your baby right There's strange things happening every day Every day Every day Every day Every day Strange things are happening every day Found me someone new And I'm really through with you Strange things are happening every day Yeah, strange things are happening Happening every day