Band of Brothers s01e08 Episode Script

The Last Patrol

We had lost some very good men there.
Toye and Guarnere had lost their legs there.
Gordon was badly hit.
A number of other people were killed.
lt was a difficult situation there.
l don't know the exact amount of men that got killed in that.
But six, seven of them were real close friends of mine.
Skip Muck died and Eugene Roe came to me.
.
.
.
.
.
about 1 0 minutes after he was killed.
He wanted to see if l wanted to go look at him.
l said, ''No.
l wouldn't be able to stand that.
'' So l didn't go.
After Bastogne, we went to Haguenau.
We wanted to see what was across the river, what strength they had.
You feel you'll live through the war.
You have a feeling it's starting to ease off.
You can't account for it.
.
.
.
.
.
it's a gut feeling, but everybody had that feeling.
l believe l might be able to live through it.
So walk carefully.
Take care of yourself.
What the 1 01st Airborne did in the Battle of the Bulge made it famous.
Papers called them ''The Battered Bastards of Bastogne.
'' They were now pulling into the comparative paradise of Haguenau the sounds of the war coming from across the river.
I had missed Bastogne.
I knew what I heard around the replacement depot.
That the war would soon be over.
Thanks for the lift.
When I was able to rejoin Easy Company they didn 't look like heroes who just helped win the war.
-George Luz! -Yeah? lt's me.
Come on, l haven't been gone that long.
Jesus.
Yes, you have.
Now, look what l've found.
Hey, guys.
Sgt.
Martin, Sgt.
Ran-- What do you want, private? Sorry, sir.
l'm David Webster, l'm back from the hospital.
Good for you.
-Where's the rest of the guys? -This is everybody.
Come on, Sgt.
Martin, this can't be everybody.
What about Hoobler, where's he? You know, Lt.
Foley, 2nd Platoon lost more guys than we did.
They're really short-handed.
Report to 2nd.
They'll find you a place.
Next truck up, Webster, you'll find 2nd.
Move.
Hey, guys.
Some lieutenant told me to report to 2nd.
-Your name's Jackson, right? -That's right.
Who's leading the platoon? -Sgt.
Malarkey.
-No officers? -l guess you didn't hear.
-No, what? They're making him lieutenant.
He's on the fast track.
-Really? That's great.
-lsn't it? Jackson, help me up, will you? -So you come from the hospital? -Yeah.
Must have liked that hospital, because we left Holland four months ago.
l wasn't only there.
There was rehab, the replacement depot.
l'm sure you tried to bust out and help us in Bastogne.
-How would l have done that? -Popeye found a way.
So did Alley, back in Holland.
And Guarnere-- Where is Guarnere? He still platoon sergeant? -No.
-Let's go.
-He got hit.
-Yeah? Yeah, Bill got hit.
Blew his whole leg off.
Hold along this line till l figure out where we're going.
Sarge? Sarge-- What's the matter, Webster? Nervous in the service? No, no, l'm fine, sarge.
Go make sure Capt.
Speirs wants you with us.
Capt.
Speirs? What happened to Capt.
Winters? He's running the whole battalion now.
Go.
Easy Company had a new C.
O.
to go with the other new faces.
The guys I knew were gone or different than I remembered.
I went through D-Day and Market Garden, but because I had missed Bastogne I was treated as a replacement and felt like I was starting all over.
-Look who it is.
Nice digs, huh, Lip? -Yeah.
-Sgt.
Lipton? -Look what l found.
-Feeling all right? -He's got pneumonia.
l'm sorry.
Why? He's alive, he's got a couch, a goddamn blanket.
He's snug as a bug.
Sgt.
Malarkey said to check if l should be in 2nd Platoon.
Have a seat, Webster.
We'll get you situated.
How long have you been sick? Long enough.
-He wants us to cross the river.
-Yeah, l bet that water's cold.
Should be able to get you some boats.
Had to be a full moon.
So much for the cover of darkness.
lt's gonna leave the patrol exposed.
-ls this the company CP for Easy? -Yes, sir.
As you were.
Lt.
Jones looking for Capt.
Speirs.
He's on his way, sir.
Why don't you sit down? Can you get me coffee? Want coffee? -No, thank you.
-All right.
What platoon are you in? We're about to find that out.
-You got any soap? l need a shave.
-l'll send some down.
-Know what you'll do? -l'll let Speirs handle it.
Capt.
Speirs, sir.
This is Lt.
Jones.
Will you go back and sack out? There's beds with fresh sheets.
l will, sir.
Just trying to make myself useful, sir.
Listen up.
Regiment wants patrol for prisoners.
This one comes from Col.
Sink, so it's not my idea.
The river is the line of resistance.
We have to cross it.
What do we do? There's a three-story building on the enemy side.
lt's occupied.
You can have 1 5 men.
Think hard about who you want to lead.
You'll need a scout, a translator.
The battalion's on covering fire.
-When? -Tonight.
01 00.
-Yes, sir.
-Speirs? l want this to be safe.
Don't take any chances on this one.
We're too far along for that.
Speirs? l wanna discuss who might go.
-Who are you? -Lt.
Jones, sir.
Right, our West Pointer.
-Yes, sir.
-When did you graduate? June 6, sir.
June 6? Of last year? D-Day, yes, sir.
All right, don't get hurt.
Sir, l'd like to volunteer for the patrol.
-Speirs, talk to you in an hour.
-Yeah.
Lt.
Jones.
We're short on officers.
You think a non-com could lead this? l can think of a few possibilities.
Martin? Malarkey? Grant? -Most of the NCOs could use a rest.
-Captain.
Request permission to go.
There's your answer.
No.
You don't have any experience.
-Report to 2nd Platoon.
-Yes, sir.
Tell.
.
.
.
Tell Heffron, Ramirez and McClung they're going.
Yes, sir.
Sir, this is Pvt.
Webster.
Sir, l'm Pvt.
Webster from 1 st Platoon.
l just got back from the hospital.
Lt.
Foley said go to 2nd, but Sgt.
Malarkey-- -Fine, 2nd.
Take.
.
.
.
-Lt.
Jones.
Lieutenant.
OP 2.
Come on.
-Are other officers in the platoon? -No, sir, just Sgt.
Malarkey.
He's getting a battlefield commission.
Maybe he'll be assisting you.
Who's that? Webster? Yeah.
How you doing, Sgt.
Kiehn? -Hi, Webster.
-Hi, sarge.
-Look what we scrounged.
We got spuds.
-ls OP 2 this way? Shit! Move! Go! Shit, they spotted us! -ls that it? -l think so.
Go! Go! Go! Come on! Get over here, get over here! All clear! All clear! Okay, okay.
Ready? -Wait.
lt was Heffron, McClung and-- -Ramirez.
Come on.
-Hey, guys, this taken? -Go ahead.
Sergeant, this is Lt.
Jones, just assigned to 2nd Platoon.
Platoon Sgt.
Malarkey.
Congratulations on the battlefield commission.
-The what? -They're making you an officer, no? Me? No.
You must be thinking of 1 st Sgt.
Lipton.
My mistake.
So you're without a platoon leader? Not any more, lieutenant.
Right.
So you wanna introduce me to the men? Well, some are sleeping downstairs.
The rest are right here.
Sergeant, a patrol's being planned for tonight, 01 00.
Across the river.
Regiment wants POWs for interrogation.
What's the situation? -Hey, Web.
-What? Come here.
l wanna talk to you a second.
Why? -You want some coffee? -No.
-Fifteen.
-Fifteen what? Looeys since D-Day.
-Any mortars? -60s out back.
-He out of high school? -West Point.
West Point? lsn't that where lke went? -Yeah.
He graduated with his son.
-Shit.
So.
.
.
.
What do you know about this patrol thing? -Nothing.
-You gotta know something.
-l don't.
-Bullshit.
You were at the CP.
This is a prisoner snatch, right? Hey, Chuck, listen to this.
Come on, Webster.
Spill it.
Capt.
Speirs is to pick 1 5 men.
Lt.
Jones wants to be one of them.
Let the kid go.
He could use the experience.
Probably could find l take it this was an outpost when you arrived? Doggies from the 79th lnfantry.
They left quickly.
-What's the report on enemy activity? -Expect flares, some mortars.
Scattered 88s, snipers.
Yeah, we dodged some mortars on our way in.
We also got some sort of railroad gun back there.
Shells the size of a deuce and a half.
Sounds like a freight train.
-They didn't try to cross the river? -No.
They have roofs over their heads, like us.
l don't think anybody wants to do anything stupid now.
-l know you know.
-Just give us the names.
Who? There are three men in this room that they think should be on the patrol.
Who? lf l tell you, you can't let on that you know.
Your secret's safe, Web.
Who is it? -Yeah.
Heffron.
-Oh, shit! McClung.
And you.
-He want anyone from another platoon? -No.
l don't know.
Not that l know.
Look, that's all l know.
l'm sorry.
So it's McClung, Heffron and Ramirez? -l'll tell them, l just need you to-- -Listen up! Got some bad news.
There is a patrol set for tonight.
Speirs wants McClung-- -We know.
-We just heard.
Webster here told us.
Easy White.
Yep.
Okay.
All right.
Out.
The PX rations just came in.
lncluding winter shoepacs.
-Beautiful.
-Yeah, finally, right? -Now we're in a nice, warm house.
-Also, we got showers.
All right! Let's move! Clear it out! lncoming! Come on, go! Get down, stay low.
-You okay? -Yeah, l'm all right.
Showers.
Let's go.
-Somebody's been hit! -Where? -What's happened? -Casualty! -Who is it? -Bill Kiehn! l just left him.
l was on my way back.
In war, soldiers sometimes die in a firefight or by artillery when they're huddled in a foxhole.
Bill Kiehn was killed because he was carrying a sack of potatoes.
In the wrong place at the wrong time.
He was dead before Doc Roe heard the call for a medic.
Get him out of here, will you? -Hey, let's go.
Let's get out of here.
-Yeah, okay.
-Did you know him well? -No, not really.
-McClung.
-Thanks.
Malarkey.
Grant, Jackson, Wynn, Liebgott, Powers and Webster.
All right? All right, l'm leading this patrol.
C.
O.
wants Grant, Liebgott, Wynn, Jackson.
.
.
.
.
.
Shifty from 3rd Platoon and Webster.
-They want anyone from 1 st? -No.
ls there anyone they don't want from 2nd? That list sounds like everybody to me.
lt's always 2nd Platoon.
-lf we were three, they'd want us.
-l can't believe Malarkey's leading.
He's lost 5 friends.
What's he got to live for? Has it been a long time since your last shower, professor? -Come on.
-ls it hot water or cold? -Come on.
Hurry up, will you? -All right.
-l guess l don't really need a shower.
-l don't either.
-Lieutenant? -Yeah? -You still wanna get your ODs dirty? -Of course.
l was just thinking.
Sgt.
Malarkey's in no condition to be on this patrol.
Maybe if you offered, you could go instead.
-You're an officer.
-They want someone experienced.
The guys they picked have plenty of that.
Lt.
Jones wanted to experience combat before the war ended.
Don Malarkey had been on the frontlines since D-Day.
If they could switch places for the patrol, it would be a small justice.
As welcome as a hot shower and a fresh uniform.
The decision, though, was not theirs to make.
Johnny, you're breaking my heart.
Come on, George.
Give me, l don't know, 1 5 bars.
Juicy Fruit.
Happy? Movement reported.
1 st Sgt.
Lipton wants you to shoot into a house.
-Could we get a Hershey bar? -Luz, you're 1 st Platoon at heart.
-There's not enough.
-Hershey bars! -Jesus! -Wait your turn! -Who they for? -Not you.
-One bar.
-No, there's not enough to go around! -ls Capt.
Speirs here? -By the river, sir.
Hey, bigmouth, give the kid a Hershey bar.
-You're kidding.
-Look who it is.
l like what you did with the place.
Yeah, l did good.
How you feeling? -l'll be fine.
-Have a Hershey.
-Thanks.
-He gets a Hershey bar? He got shot in the ass.
-Did l say to stick your ass out? -No, but l expect sympathy.
l should rub it? Try to get him out of the war, he comes back.
l heard the Krauts are finished.
Well, to make sure, we gotta row across the river tonight.
.
.
.
.
.
grab a few and ask them in person.
-Are you kidding? -Wish l was.
Welcome back.
That reminds me, Web.
l need you to run these to OP 2.
Grenade launchers for the night patrol.
Any day now.
There you go.
Hey, you know what? Send these too.
Hear what happened on D Company's patrol last night? Replacement lieutenant blew his foot off.
Fresh from West Point.
Had to come back empty-handed.
Maybe he was a friend, lieutenant.
What you got there? More Hershey bars and Lucky Strikes to hoard? Cobb, with the mouth, please.
The kid's just trying to do his job, all right? To hell with it.
Count them, Vest.
l gotta blast this house.
-You happy? -Coming, Perco? Watch this shit for me.
Web, come with me.
Will Capt.
Speirs be there? -Same vicinity.
-l'll join you.
-Where we going? -The house l gotta blast.
-Will Capt.
Winters be with him? -Jesus.
Look, l don't know.
Maybe.
-l'm coming too.
-Come on, guys.
-Give me a bar.
-l'm supposed to watch them.
Come on, you don't smoke.
l got a wounded ass.
Did lntelligence give you any information? Third house on the left.
When the men are in boats, l want a quad 50.
Captain Winters? l feel that l should go on the patrol.
l know l could use the experience.
Denied.
Anything else? You're not gonna lead that patrol, Lieutenant Jones.
Permission to speak, sir.
Go on.
Sergeant Malarkey could use a break.
He said that he did not mind if l took his place on the patrol.
That was nice of him.
-Captain Winters? -Yes.
l'd really like to be on that patrol, sir.
lf it's true the Krauts are finished.
.
.
.
l haven't really done anything except deliver mail and type morning reports.
-Absolutely.
-Thank you, captain.
-He has a point about Sergeant Malarkey.
-Yeah, a point.
Fine.
You can go.
There will be a briefing.
CP, 1 700.
Yes, sir.
So who do you have in mind leading this thing, if not Malarkey? Come on, he can't be leading.
l'm not sure what they decided.
No way.
Not on his first day.
Well, do you see any other officer here? -What? -They call you guys too? So who's in charge of this bullshit? No, he ain't.
lf he ain't, it's you, Chuck.
Or Shifty or Mo.
Well, that would be better.
-Ten-hut! -Jesus.
At ease.
-Gentlemen.
-Sir.
We've assembled 1 5 of you for this prisoner snatch tonight, 01 00.
We've secured four rubber boats to get you across the river.
Lieutenant Jones here is the ranking officer.
He'll be along as an observer.
Martin will lead the patrol in Malarkey's place.
Battalion will cover your withdrawal.
We've identified targets, planned fire.
We hear the whistles, we open up.
Don't blow them until you're in the boats.
lf the house is empty? lt won't, but we know it's an outpost and want it destroyed.
.
.
.
.
.
so lay some demo on a time delay.
Move fast, but carefully.
Put a perimeter around the house.
Get your rifle grenades in the window, and the assault team in.
Good.
Remember, it's about prisoners.
Don't pop the first thing that moves.
-Clear? -Yes, sir.
Good.
Picked your assault team? McClung, Sisk, Cobb, Garcia and Webster, as translator.
The rest of you guys, a base of fire with Sergeant Grant.
-You speak German, right, Webster? -Yeah.
A little bit.
Good.
That's my team, sir.
-Questions? -No, sir.
-Good.
Good luck.
-Thank you, sir.
-Ten-hut! -As you were.
Carry on! A little German? His German's as good as mine.
-Jackson.
Here you go.
You need this.
-Thanks.
Can you believe that guy? Webster.
Tries to get out of everything.
Whatever.
-l want four men on each block.
-l was thinking about.
.
.
.
Four men to go in, four on the left flank.
.
.
.
-Sir? Sir? -Yes? -Liebgott and l, we both speak German.
-Yeah? You said 1 5.
There are 1 6 of us, including two translators.
Well, fine.
Hey, Liebgott.
You wanna sit this one out? Yes, sir.
-You wanna supervise the three squads? -Thanks, buddy.
-Thank you, sir.
-Yeah.
You men going on patrol.
.
.
.
.
.
nothing rattles, nothing shines, no helmets.
Lieutenant? Thank you.
You set for tonight? -l'm ready.
-Those Krauts will catch hell.
So l hear.
-l'm not personally going in.
-Martin, right? Martin and McClung.
l'm supposed to stay in the rear and give them cover.
lt's the best place to be.
Fifteen men crossing a river to capture prisoners from a German post.
Getting back safely could be accomplished in 1 0 minutes.
The same mission could be met with disaster, and result in 1 5 Americans killed or wounded in action.
Those of us who had seen combat put that out of our minds.
Those who hadn 't probably thought of little else as we waited for darkness.
-Any problems? -No.
lt's secured to the tree.
No sign of any AP mines.
Let's go.
Webster, come on.
Keep it steady, keep it steady.
Oh, shit.
l can't swim! Garcia, grab Sisk.
Okay, keep going.
Come on, stay focused.
Come on, come on.
Use the rope.
Use the rope.
Come on.
Cutters.
Good.
To the side.
Let's go.
Come on.
Clear.
Easy there.
Clear.
Powers, go! Go, McClung.
McClung, move up.
ln twos, up.
Powers, Wynn, secure the left flank.
Lieutenant, take Grant and Heffron, secure the right and the crossroads.
Security out.
Go.
Move.
Jackson, hold on! Let's go! Jackson! Wait! Put it down! Keep your hands up where l can see them! Keep those Krauts quiet! Jackson.
Vest, take care of him.
Ramirez, watch Vest.
Let's go, Webster, let's go! Come on! -Check them for weapons.
-Cover me! Keep those men quiet! McClung, cover him! Prime and bury the charges! Shut up, you two! And pick him up.
McClung, these two are gonna carry the wounded Kraut.
Webster, tell them! l said, shut up! Ramirez, pick up Jackson.
We're moving out! Where are you going? Everybody moves on my command! Are you ready? Are you ready? Shut up, you! Come on! We all go together! Let's go! Move! Move out! Let's go! Move! Move! Webster, come on! Powers, fall back! We're moving out! Keep those prisoners' heads down.
Keep moving! Wynn, fall back! We're moving out! Let's go! We're falling back! Covering fire! Heffron, l want you to fall back now! Let's go! Move! Get back to the boat! l'll cover! Go! Keep those men moving! Lieutenant, take the whistle! Let's go! -Go! Move it, Webster! Let's go! -Move! Let's go! Stay low, keep moving! Keep moving! Fall back to the boats now! Fall back! Jesus Christ, come on.
Blow the goddamn whistle! Okay, get into the boats! Right now! Get in the boats, keep moving! Come on, move! l'm gonna shoot you, you fucking Kraut! Shoot him, we'll have to come back for more.
The boat, now! You get up, you Kraut piece of shit! lnto the boats! Quick, get in the boats! Come on! Let's go! Everyone in the boats! Let's get these boats in the water! Start pulling! You're okay, Jackson! Keep pulling! Keep going! Come on! Come on, Perconte, let's go! -Where's the medic? -We're almost there.
Get Jackson! Everybody off the boats! Let's go! Get cover! Wounded! We got wounded, come on! Get the Krauts back there, shake them down! Move! Move! McClung! McClung! Get on to the company CP, let them know what we got.
Shut up! l can't do this! l can't do this! Webster, stay with him.
Hey, Shifty, watch Vest! -l'm going to get a medic.
Got this? -Yeah.
Come on! Get his legs.
Listen to me.
You have to calm down or we can't help you.
Settle down.
-He's gonna die! -Jackson, don't listen to him.
Look at me, you'll be fine.
Everything's gonna be okay.
Keep still.
Be calm, buddy.
Everything's fine.
Goddamn it! No! You'll jeopardize the battalion! The battalion needs them.
Stay against the wall! Watch what you're doing! We won't get more prisoners because you killed one! -Private! -He's gonna fucking die! Hey, sit down! The medic is coming.
-Where the fuck is the medic? -The doctor's on his way.
You'll be okay.
All right.
Doc's here.
You're okay.
All right, Jackson, take it easy.
Okay.
Okay.
Okay.
Light.
l need some light.
Give me some light.
All right, look at the flame.
Look at the flame.
Okay, that's good.
Let's get him out of here.
-Let's go.
Help the doc move him.
-l don't wanna die! l don't wanna die! -lt's okay.
-Let's get him out of here.
-Hey, take it easy.
-l don't wanna die, please help me.
Hey, it's okay.
lt's all right.
You're all right.
-Jackson? -God! Oh, my God! Jackson, you are not gonna die.
l need you to hang on.
Jackson? Eugene Jackson was 20 years old.
He'd lied about his age when he joined the Army at 1 6.
His family got a telegram from the War Department saying he died a hero on a mission that would help win the war.
In fact, Eugene lost his life on a stretcher in a basement in Haguenau crying out in agony while his friends looked on helplessly.
He was just one more casualty in a war that was supposed to be all but over.
Did they put that in the report on the ADA? We're working on it.
How long are you keeping the quad 50? When they want it back, l'll hand it over.
Keep moving.
Go on.
Get up on the truck.
Up, up.
Status? Private Jackson took a grenade frag rushing the enemy OP.
-lt was his own grenade.
-He died of his wounds, sir.
-Any others? -No, sir.
Well executed.
lt's not your fault.
Talk to your men.
-Carry on.
-Thanks, sir.
We heard you got two prisoners.
Good work.
Jackson's dead.
Yeah, we heard.
Yeah, well, they want another patrol tonight.
What are you doing, Cobb? You leave someone on the bank? Yeah.
Yeah, we did.
lt's the third prisoner that was too far gone to bring back.
Maybe we should put him out of his misery.
-Fuck his misery.
-l can't listen to it anymore.
-Sir, you want a cigarette? -Yeah.
-Who's got a light? -Here.
Hang on, sir.
Twenty-two.
What are you looking at, Webster? Yeah.
That's what l thought, college boy.
Are you drunk, trooper? -Leave me alone.
-Answer the question.
Yes, sir.
l am drunk, sir.
Drunk, sick and tired of fucking patrols, taking orders-- Hey, Cobb.
Shut up.
lt's boring, okay? Taking his side, Johnny? Yeah, l am.
So he knows we lost a man? Yeah.
He also knows you picked up two prisoners who talked.
-About what? -OB, supplies, Hitler's favorite color.
-None of it gets us across the river.
-What's the point? Honestly? Sink's been on the phone all day, bragging.
l think he's showing off.
l don't know what to tell you.
You gave him a successful patrol, now he wants two.
Successful.
Sir, the men are mustered.
lf you want me to brief them, l'm gonna.
lt's the same roster as last night.
Well, mostly.
-Evening, gents.
-Evening, colonel.
At ease.
You all did a damn fine job on a tough mission.
l wish you good luck tonight.
l'll be expecting more of the same.
-Have you briefed the men? -Just on our way.
Make damn sure you remind them how proud l am of what they did.
Yes, sir.
So l'll brief them now, sir? No.
No, l'll do it.
Sarge, they're on their way in.
Ten-hut! -Martin.
-Sir.
-At ease.
This everybody, Grant? -Sir.
You men did an excellent job last night.
l'm proud.
Colonel Sink is proud too.
He's so proud he wants you to do another patrol tonight.
The outpost we hit last night will go up in flames.
-Martin? -Yes, sir.
We'd have to venture farther into town.
Captain Speirs, the map.
Yeah.
Sergeant Grant? We have enemy movement here and here.
Which means this is our new house target here.
We recovered the boats.
We'll set off from the same place.
We're not changing the plan any, sir? No.
The plan is the same.
lt will be 0200 hours instead of 01 00.
-ls that clear? -Yes, sir.
Okay.
Good.
Because l want you all to get a full night's sleep tonight.
ln the morning, you will report that you made it across the river.
.
.
.
.
.
into German lines.
.
.
.
.
.
but were unable to secure any live prisoners.
-Understand? -Yes, sir.
Good.
Look sharp for tomorrow.
We're moving off the line.
Did l fucking hear that right? Moving off the line! lt's a new way to fight a war.
Don't bother writing this up.
l'll take care of it.
l might enjoy it.
l think you might be onto something-- Lieutenant Jones.
-Sir.
-Join us at the company CP.
-First Sergeant Lipton? -Sir.
Your honorable discharge as an enlisted man.
.
.
Just keep them coming, Luz.
.
.
.
and your battlefield commission as a second lieutenant.
-Congratulations.
-Thank you.
-Lip, congratulations.
-Thanks.
Thank you.
Welcome back, sir.
-Hey, that's Harry to you.
-l didn't expect to see you this soon.
-l figured you'd be nursing that scratch.
-Did you miss me, Lewis? Lt.
Jones.
Regiment has seen fit to promote you to first lieutenant.
They want you on staff up there.
Don't go far with that.
-Congratulations and good luck.
-Thank you, sir.
Dismissed.
l guess you lost another platoon leader, Web? A second patrol never happened.
Word was Captain Nixon wrote up a bogus report.
Regiment never got wise.
As we pulled out of Haguenau, many of us felt that a corner had been turned and we all might make it home alive.
We'll know more closer to the line.
Oh, before l forget.
Col.
Sink's unhappy with your uniform.
He says it's not befitting to your rank.
Oak leaves.
Congratulations, major.
Gentlemen, we're ready.
l'll drive.
-Sergeant Malarkey.
-Good luck, sir.
-Sergeant Martin.
-Yeah, lieutenant? -Good work.
-Thanks.
Good to have you along.
Here.
I wondered if people would know what it cost the soldiers to win this war.
In America, things were already looking like peacetime.
The standard of living was on the rise, nightclubs were booming.
You couldn 't get a hotel room in Miami Beach, it was so crowded.
Could anyone know the price paid by soldiers in terror, agony and bloodshed if they'd never been to places like Normandy, Bastogne or Haguenau?