Berkeley Square (1998) s01e09 Episode Script

Wednesday's Child

1 Jos Carrera for his beautiful bride @JosC on Gab.
Com I'm sorry you didn't get a chance to say goodbye to Tom but I'll get his proper address from Nanny Wickam And you can write to him as often as you like.
The Romans in Gordo, while we're waiting for Harriet.
Be a good boy and learn lots of Roman things.
I'll be back as soon as I can.
Oh Hannah.
You'll never guess what? Come somewhere quiet.
I've got so much to tell you.
I'm sorry, Miss Isabel It's the most delicious secret in the whole world.
Can it keep? I don't mean to be unkind but I have to see an old friend who's in terrible time.
I thought I was your friend? There's fruitcake, biscuits, parkin, treacle toffee It's respectable sort of tuck box for a young gent, isn't it? How would I know? Oh spare me.
About to enjoy ourselves, are we? Oh yeah, I'll enjoy myself alright.
Oh, humbugs, forgot the humbugs.
Go and change into your coachman's uniform and be quick.
Hang on.
What about me upstairs duties? I'll find someone else to do those.
You're the only one Mr.
Potter trusts to drive the carriage nicely.
Jenkins and Folks, both down with influenza.
I make a note to stock up on the lemons and the honey.
One of these days, I'm gonna kill that Pringle.
Look I'll tell you I told him, I told the other one, I told everybody.
I board baby for six pence a week Terrible sick typhoid all round the street, all around the whole neighborhood.
One morning, baby wakes up dead.
I don't know what to do.
It's never happened to me before.
And you didn't think to register the death? What do I know about registers? I don't know how things are done here.
You did tell the baby's mother? Yes, of course.
When? What? When did you tell the baby's mother? How many six pence a week did you take before you told her? I never take anything that don't belong to me.
Never.
So you informed the mother of the baby's death immediately.
Yes, of course.
Well, if you can just give us a name, Mrs.
Bronowski? The mother's name.
Say goodbye, Tom.
Safe journey, Master Tom.
And if they don't feed you properly, you let me know and I'll come down and sort them out.
It'll be half term, (unknown) And before you know it, it will be Christmas.
And you won't want to come home because you'll be having such a good time.
Don't want to miss the train.
The very best of luck, Master Tom.
Thank you.
Right.
Coats on.
Let's get you to Miss Turner.
You alright, Nanny.
Yes, thank you.
Just some sad news of an old friend.
Nothing that wasn't expected.
I'm sorry.
Now then, fetch the small scissors and we'll trim Master Ivo's nails before he scratches his own eyes out.
We ought to have done that days ago.
Please, all I want to do is see her.
May I ask what your interest is, Miss? She's an old friend.
I lodged with her when I first came down to London.
Oh, yes.
May I ask what she's been charged with? Well, nothing as yet.
We're just trying to get to the truth of a delicate matter.
Please, I only want to see her for a minute and if she isn't under arrest, I can do that, surely.
Follow me, please.
You see Tom.
I bet you've never spotted a bunch of carriages, have you now? There you are, you see Tom.
The Army's turned up specially to take you on board.
We'll stay until the train leaves.
Very good, mum.
Best of luck, Master Tom.
Thank you.
Goodbye.
Stupid girl.
Everything is going to be just fine.
Buryng baby in backyard is a little misunderstanding.
Not a big crime.
I say, sorry stupid old woman didn't know any better.
Nothing bad happened.
It's all right.
Please let me help.
Let me tell them it was my baby.
Emily Baxter.
No, Hannah Randall.
I was just passing.
I thought I heard you say you were the baby's mother.
Yes, I am.
Only Mrs.
Bronowski told us the baby's mother was called Emily Baxter.
Are you stupid or something? Look at her.
Look at her.
She's a good girl in a very respectable position.
How long do you think she'd keep her job if the family finds out she had the baby the wrong side of the blanket? Of course, I didn't tell you real name.
A deceased baby.
My condolences, Miss Randall.
Thank you.
Tell me, how soon after I'm sorry, what was the name? It was a boy, his name was Billy.
Of course, I'm sorry.
How soon after Billy's death were you told? I said I sent the telegram the same day.
I'm asking Miss Randall.
Yes, that's right, she did.
Why didn't you register the baby's death or even report it? Well, I was Because I lied to her.
She was upset.
She just lost her baby.
I told her I've taken care of everything.
I didn't want to make no fuss.
I didn't know what to do.
Is that what happened? Yes.
You're very good at telling lies.
Aren't you, Mrs.
Bronowski? Oh yes.
In Poland, everybody tells lies all the time.
Because, you see, in Poland, police is too stupid to see a good truth when they hear it.
And Nanny Glot said, we'll put a little bit of paint on it and then it'll be as good as new.
Oh my goodness, she was a wild one in those days.
Nanny Glot taught me everything I know.
Like you and me really.
Out.
Don't you dare talk to my nursemaid like that.
Lydia, stay exactly where you are.
Very well.
I don't care if she hears what I have to say.
And I don't wish to hear anything said in a tone of voice.
I just came up to say goodbye.
I'm being packed off to college tomorrow in disgrace, as well you know.
I hope you're satisfied What you did to Lydia was wrong.
What I did to Lydia was nobody's business but mine you interfering old bitch.
Stop it.
I'll tell your father.
I wouldn't dirty my hands.
I suppose it all works out in the end, doesn't it? Father's wife thinks she and her welp are so special.
But by the time you dealt with him as you've dealt with me, she'll know differently, won't she? Oh, don't cry Nanny.
Mrs.
McCluskey.
Mrs.
McCluskey.
I'm coming.
Mrs.
McCluskey? What do you want? I have a warrant for the arrest of your son, Edward McCluskey.
Known as Ned Jones, sometimes as Ned McCluskey.
If we information that he is also employed as a footman in this household.
and that you are knowingly harboring a dangerous Is this your usual mode of behavior, Constable? Do you normally walk into respectable households and intimidate the servants? I'm pursuing a suspected murderer, Miss.
Then kindly pursue him somewhere else.
If Mrs.
McCluskey says he's not here, then you may believe her.
Your information is wrong.
I understand that the man was employed here briefly.
Fortunately, his mother was wise enough to send him packing when she learned he was in trouble.
He's not been seen or heard of since.
If you wish to dispute the honesty of both myself and the other members of staff I suggest you do it in front of our employer and your superior.
Very well, Miss.
I'll take your word for it for the time being.
Good day.
Blimey.
You can put the carriage away, thank You Edward.
We shan't be requiring it again today.
Sir.
You've written in the Mansfield supper party for tonight.
I didn't think you wanted to go.
I didn't but I think the distraction will do me good, don't you? It'll be half term before you know it.
And anyway, he'll settle down in no time.
Yes, I know.
Why don't you write to him now, if it'll make you feel better.
Edward can catch the midday post if you hurry.
Yes, I might do that.
So you see, if I come over a bit sharp at times, it's because life hasn't been all that easy for me.
Bringing Ned up all on my own working every that God sends.
I don't mean nothing by it.
Oh, let it go, my big sister.
Sister? Yeah, didn't you know? Are you feeling better now? I'll be happier when Police have been around again.
What's the matter? Nanny sent them off with a flea in their ear.
What? They know you're here.
There had a warrant for your arrest.
Ned, you have to go.
What on Earth is going on? Nothing, Mr.
Potter.
Just congratulating Edward.
Won two guineas at the dogs last night.
I don't approve of gambling.
It always leads to trouble.
You get on upstairs.
Mrs.
St.
John wants to see you.
Yes, Mr Potter.
See what she wants.
Get back here as quick as you can.
Morning, Lydia.
Morning, your Ladyship.
Has Mrs.
Collins gone out? No, your Ladyship.
She's taken to a bed.
Why? Nanny Collins was a bit, um, upset, your Ladyship.
And who upset her.
Not you surely.
Lord Hugh, perhaps? I see.
Thank you.
Look, let me deliver this, right.
And let me think.
What exactly did the police say? That they had information you were here.
I can't imagine who could have told them.
I can.
Who? Pringle.
Pringle? But why on earth would she do something like that? I thought she liked you.
That would be part of it, yes.
Yeah, you have 'em.
I'm fed up with nothing but crumbs.
I'm sorry Isabelle.
When I have received word from Mr.
Thorndike that Captain Mason's circumstances are favorable, I may perhaps allow a little license.
But until then, I will not permit you to see him unchaperoned.
Now, where is my handkerchief? May I wait here unchaperoned? You may.
Mason.
(unknown) Captain Mason? Yes, but only the 20th today.
I thought I was teasing.
Which would you rather be, my darling? The first infatuation of a naive youth or the last great love of an experienced man? You see? I care for no one but you.
We will promenade the park.
Got some ham and cheese and a loaf.
It'll keep you going.
Thanks.
You write to her when you're safe.
Yeah, I will.
Just let me go, mum.
Where will you go? I've got an idea.
Let me see if it works.
I'll come back and tell you.
Promise.
Maddy, it's taken long enough to find you.
I ain't gonna let go of you now.
Ned, if it was only an accident, there must be someone who can speak up for you.
Dan's been trying to find someone but If he'd come up with anything, I would have heard by now.
Dan? Yeah, my mate.
Dan Smyth.
Here was there at the fight.
With some 20 witnesses who saw what happened.
Not one of them saying a word.
I must go.
Keep safe.
And you.
What's done is done and it's all been dealt with.
No, it hasn't.
I go to the nursery and I find Mrs.
Collins in bed, Lydia close to tears and every time I find someone looking unhappy, the name of Hugh crops up.
Very well.
In that case, I shall have to get the truth straight from the horse's mouth.
Hugh, I'd like a word.
I'm sorry, I'm just out for a breath of air.
In the drawing-room.
Now.
My word, we are in a tiz.
Working up a bit of a flash, aren't we? What's the matter? I don't know, Hugh.
There's no one seems willing to tell me.
What I do know, however, is that this was a peaceful happy household until you arrived home and now it's not and I'd like to know why.
Afraid it's none of your business, old thing.
Wrong, Hugh.
Whatever's going on is making your father deeply unhappy and that makes it my business.
I'm his wife.
So you are Signed, sealed and delivered of a brat to prove it.
How dare you? how dare I? You pick up an English pier in a Paris art gallery as you'd pick up a new frock.
You take over my father, my home, even my Nanny.
You think you can insinuate yourself into one of the finest families in the country simply by giving birth.
Any trollop can do that.
There.
Should we pretend this never happened, as well? Stop singing.
Why do you keep singing all day? Because it makes me feel better.
I certainly believe the girl.
You should have seen her face when I asked her about the baby.
But We have a dead baby.
A bereaved mother, a batty old foreigner, an explanation of sorts, and no evidence to the contrary.
Ah, Doctor Henderson.
Afternoon, Detective.
Sergeant, they're in through there, is she? I appreciate this, Doctor.
Oh, by the way, I'll have my post-mortem notes from the Beaufort Street case ready for you in the morning, if that's alright.
There's a case then? Oh, yes.
Significant traces of arsenic in all three deceased infants, and I can tell you I'll find symptoms of incipient arsenic poisoning when I examine the survivors.
Don't look at me like that.
I didn't do it.
What's the point of having laws against these baby farmers if you people won't enforce them? Good afternoon.
Perhaps we just don't have the evidence yet.
You surprise me, Mrs.
Mansfield.
I always thought the Colonel and his wife were devoted.
Obviously not.
So pointless, don't you think.
She's given up her children, her fortune, and her reputation and for what? An artist.
Quite scandalous.
Indeed.
You alright, my dear? You look pale.
Forgive me.
Half my household seem to be afflicted with influenza I fear I may be the next victim.
Mrs.
Norman Saunders Miss Isabel Hutchinson Captain Henry Mason My dear.
Hurt pride.
Do you inform the police about every man that rejects your advances? All I heard was that the police was after him but didn't know what for until I separated what.
Didn't know he was a murderer.
He is not a murderer.
How do you know? Because he's told me exactly what happened and I believe him.
It was a terrible accident.
You only say that cause you're sweet on him.
Yes, I am.
I love him very much.
and if what you've done means he ends up being punished unfairly and taken away from me then I will never, ever forgive you.
Nanny? See if I care.
May we make our excuses directly after dinner? I really am feeling quite unwell.
Our son went off to school today.
Victoria's greatly attached to him.
Just make sure you never demonstrate your attachment at the school, my dear.
Boys are mortified by attachment.
And tell me, do you expect an attachment there? I think Isabel is a bit young.
Ladies and gentlemen.
Oh, so exciting.
Please.
Go on, Harry.
Ladies and gentlemen, since I am discovered may I take this opportunity to announce that tonight, the most charming and most beautiful Miss Isabel Hutchinson has done me the extraordinary honour of consenting to be my wife.
Are you sure you don't want to give Ivo his bath? No, you can do it this morning.
Would you like another cup of tea? Thank you.
You've not hardly eaten anything.
Have a little bit of toast.
Good start makes a good day.
That's the second day in a row.
Second time our breakfast has come back untouched.
Probably gone down with the flu.
Or another interesting condition.
Come on Annie, buck up.
He'll be alright.
In my young day, you would have been locked in your room and given nothing but bread and water for a month.
Well, have you nothing to say for yourself? What do you want me to say? I want an explanation, Miss.
I'm in love with Harry and I'm going to marry him.
I said an explanation of your conduct last night, night not a spoonful of sentimental piffle.
Have you no sense of responsibility? Towards whom? Young ladies have a responsibility to conduct themselves impeccably in order to preserve the honor and reputation not only of themselves, but of their entire family.
Have you any idea how the slightest breath of scandal could affect your Aunt and Uncle? There won't be any scandal.
When Mr.
Thorndike assures me of that, I shall believe him.
Meanwhile, you are not to leave this house.
You're confined to barracks.
Go and see him off, George.
No.
I didn't intend for you never to talk to him again.
I've made my choice.
All that going on right next door and I never suspected a thing.
I think she was quite nice for a foreigner.
and just goes to show, doesn't it? So, what are we looking for? I'm not sure.
I don't know where she'd have put them all if she was farming them.
Well, maybe she's right.
Maybe we are too stupid to see good truth when we hear it.
What's that? Whoa.
Smells like medicine.
Nasty.
The nursery does feel rather empty without Tom, doesn't it? Yes.
Mind you, I suppose it means I can devote more time to Harry and Inogene.
Laundry, please.
Do you come from a large family, Nanny Wickham? Me? No, it's just me and my brother.
My Auntie Nell has got seven though so that makes up for it.
Did your mother choose to only have two children? Choose? Some women do.
If you pardon me saying so, ma'am, there's only two ways of choosing how many children you have.
ones very lonely and the others very dangerous.
My mom's not a lonely sort of person.
No, I just don't think it ever happened.
What do you mean by dangerous? Well, there are some women who do things, aren't there? What sort of things? All I know is that a woman in the next street to us went to see someone.
I don't know what happened.
She was hurt so badly, she came home and bled to death on the parlor carpet.
I'm sorry but I just don't understand how people can do something like that.
No, nor do I.
You haven't seen Nanny Collins, have you? I can't find her anywhere.
Maybe she's gone out.
No, she wouldn't.
Not without telling me.
Nevermind, gorgeous.
With her out of the way and Lord Hugh off about his business, you and me got the whole house to ourselves.
We can finally Keep your hands to yourself, or I'll tell on you.
Anyone would think I committed a crime or something.
I thought it was good when people got engaged.
Thank You Bertie.
It is, my love.
Sometimes there are right ways of telling people and, well, not so right ways.
I think it's ever so romantic Begging pardon.
See Hannah.
Everyone's for it except you and Aunt Effie.
I never said I was against it, Miss Isabel.
All I said was, well, your aunt has only your best interests at heart.
And it would be foolish to commit yourself to a man you weren't certain was worthy of you.
Oh, but he is.
He's so charm Come in.
Mrs.
Saunders would like to see you in the drawing room, Miss Isabel.
Thank you.
This is it.
She must have heard from Mr.
Thorndyke.
Wish me luck.
Best of British luck, cousin Isobel.
Thank You, Bertie.
I'm gonna have to go and see mommy now.
Oh dear.
Lydia, whatever is the matter.
Read this for me please, Mr.
Fowler.
It's from a friend of Nanny Collins informing her of the death of another friend.
Yes, yes.
I know that bit.
What are you doing reading Mrs.
Collins personal correspondence? Well, I'm not, you are.
Because she's gone and I don't know where and well I thought she might be there.
But I can't read it to find out where.
Church of St.
Mary.
The funeral was three hours ago.
If she did go, she should have been back by now.
Perhaps I should inform her Ladyship.
Oh no.
Her Ladyship would be cross because Nanny's gone out without saying.
and then Nanny will get retired and have to go and live in Bournemouth with her niece and she's already unhappy enough as it is.
Hush Lydia.
Calm yourself.
Oh please, Mr.
Fowler.
Can't we go and look for her? Go and put your coat on.
I'll send Riley up to mind the baby.
You better get back.
It's gonna tip down soon.
I know.
Jack, I'm so glad to seeing you.
I was terrified you didn't turn up today.
Come on.
It's gonna be all right.
Look, I can't promise I'll find this Dan Smythe but if I don't, it won't be for lack of trying.
Thanks.
You have got it bad, didn't ya.
I just didn't think it would be like this.
I thought it would be, you know, simple.
What? Falling in love? Nice young what? Drapes assistant? Bankers clerk? Green grocer? Instead of which you get mixed up with a prizefighter who's on the run for murder.
Yeah, funny old life.
Don't.
Hey, we'll sort it out, all right? Where's he now? I don't know.
He said he had an idea.
And he'd let me know if it worked out.
Any known reason why you shouldn't serve in His Majesty's army? No, sir.
Right.
Name? Peter Clancy Nanny Collins.
I've been looking everywhere for you.
I've been here.
But why didn't you say where you was going? I didn't want you to know.
There's a cab waiting.
Are you ready to come home now.
No one came, you know.
Not any of the nannies.
I known only because her landlady put a notice in the newspaper.
Then it's a great pity that her families didn't love her as much as yours loves you, Mrs.
Collins.
They all love at the time.
And then they forget.
Decide not to when it becomes a bother.
We can only do what seems right at the time, Mr.
Fowler.
And what you do is right, Nanny.
No, it's not.
No.
It can't be.
Otherwise, it would all be different.
It will be the same for me when my time comes.
And I shall deserve it.
And I brought up Master George and Miss Annabel and look at them.
Miss Annabelle cold and spiteful and teaching Master Louie to be just the same.
Master George weakened but I didn't mind that.
And I had sole charge of Master Hugh.
So who would have told him to be so cruel if it wasn't me? I have failed so very badly.
The only thing you failed to do, Nanny, is to realize that once people leave the nursery, they become themselves.
It's not your fault.
Shall we go home? I have no home.
You have the same home I have, Nanny Collins and Lydia.
And if we don't have families of our own close by, then we have each other to care for.
And that's a very good thing indeed.
Now, if Lydia would take the umbrella, I would be obliged if you would take my arm It's outrageous.
How dare she? Go on Bertie.
Sorry, please, just for a minute while I talk to cousin Isabel.
She can't do this to me.
Now come on.
Now, tell me what's happened.
I've been forbidden to see Harryever again.
Really? Why? No good reason.
Oh, there must be some reason.
He had an outstanding mess bill.
All young officers have outstanding mess bills but it doesn't mean anything.
Well, it either means are too forgetful to pay it or they don't have the money to pay it.
Well, of course he has the money.
How could they wreck my life over some stupid bill? It's so unimportant.
I then expect there's more to it than that.
What else did your Aunt say? That he has a reputation as a scoundrel and a libertine.
Oh.
But it's nonsense.
He's been quite open about it.
I know he's been in love before.
One wouldn't expect otherwise.
I wouldn't want it otherwise.
I don't want to be the first choice of someone who doesn't know any better.
Well, perhaps that's what your Aunt thinks he is for you.
And what can I do about that? That's the whole point of the season.
It's alright for you.
You can have any number of liaisons without damaging your reputation.
I can't.
Well, as I said, um, your Aunt is only protecting your interests.
I'm quite old enough to protect them for myself.
How they even have my medicine? I used to be a naughty girl.
but now, I'm 93 today but slim It don't work.
Some sort of painkiller.
Tincture of Laudanum, if I had to I guess.
Well, just so you don't accuse us of not doing our job properly perhaps you care to take a look at the little corpse we found in Limehouse.
I'll do that.
What's the matter? You're so very unhappy.
It's not just Tom leaving, is it? It's It's everything.
There has been a great deal of bad feeling lately.
Yes.
It didn't used to be like this.
Sorry.
Victoria, if you wish to live apart we can come to an arrangement.
I'll make sure you emerge blameless, that you were provided for, and that you maintain full contact with the children.
Is that what you want? It's the last thing on Earth that I want.
But I can't live with your hatred, Victoria.
I just can't.
I don't hate you.
I'm not sure I know how to love you anymore.
You used to.
You used to let me.
Yes I know.
Forgive me.
Are we really beyond hope? No, I put her to bed with a hot water bottle.
She says she's alright but she's not herself, Mr.
Fowler.
Well, I think that's all you can do for the moment.
She's had a very sad and upsetting day.
Bereavement comes hard at her age Thanks.
Comes hard at any age.
Yeah, you weren't half good with her today.
I've known Nanny Collins a long time Yeah, but, you're so kind and sensible.
Talking of which, I've had a rather put out Gibbons to deal with today.
I gather that you would rather unkind to him.
He was unkind to me.
Lydia, Gibbons has many faults believe me.
But unlike others we could mention his heart is very definitely in the right place.
And I'm certain that the last thing in the world he meant to do was offend you.
Yeah, well, maybe I was a bit unceccesary with him.
It's just that Oh, Mr.
Fowler.
I don't know what to make of it all.
Really, I don't.
You think one thing and it turns out to be another.
I mean, where I come from, you don't give people the eyes.
Well, unless you're after courting them and Up here, everyone does it to everyone else all the time and it don't signify nothing.
I feel so stupid when I keep getting it wrong.
and everyone seems to know I'm stupid so they take advantage, not just Lord Hugh.
Maddy's brother Jack and now Gibbons.
You don't know where you are.
I'll say I'm sorry to him in the morning Only if you want to.
I did put your point of view to him myself.
You're the kindest man I know, Mr.
Fowler.
I can't imagine ever coming to any harm with you.
Yes, there are significant traces of Laudanum in the infant.
So much, in fact, that I'm surprised that little soul lived as long as he did.
Right.
And when your father threatened to horse whip me.
It was a new world to him, he hated it.
But you didn't? I found it exciting.
Ah, look at me now.
I wonder how Tom's getting along.
My first term at Tanmier Hall, I was known as the Draper's boy.
No name, just the Draper's boy.
I do hope Tom doesn't suffer.
He'll be all right.
He'll be known as the boy who shot his father.
I doubt he'll be bullied.
Will you get dressed and come down to dinner? I'm not hungry.
But if you wanted, you could ask Mrs.
McCluskey to send a tray for you up here.
Thank you.
just promise me one thing, Victoria.
What? That you and Harry Mason never ventured beyond the bounds of affectionate friendship.
I promise.
You bore a child out of wedlock? Yes, madame.
Do you know by whom? By a young man of a good family.
Had he not had been killed in an accident, I would not be working in London at all.
I'm sorry.
Mrs.
Saunders, I'm afraid there's more.
Perhaps Miss Randall might be allowed to sit down.
What? What are you talking about? You know everything already.
I know how fond you are of the old woman but in this instance, you put your faith in the wrong person.
I can't say how sorry I am to have to tell you this, Miss Randall, but there seems no doubt that your baby was poisoned.
What? And the evidence suggests that Mrs.
Bronowski is the perpetrator.
She's been arrested and she'll appear in front of a magistrate first thing in the morning to be charged with murder.