Blue Bloods s09e02 Episode Script

Meet the New Boss

1 So? I'm getting transferred to the 2-9.
Oh, uh, well, that house is supposed to be a real zoo.
Yeah, well, boss didn't give me a choice.
Think your dad had a hand in it? Busting your chops a little? No, I think it was just the luck of the draw.
Some luck.
Well, I like a challenge.
Maybe I'll put in for a transfer over there.
Yeah, let me get the lay of the land first.
Of course.
Uh, do you think he'd put the kibosh on that, too? Us in the same house? I think he'll say what he wants, we'll say what we want, and at the end of the day, it'll be our choice.
That's how it works in our family.
- If you say so.
- I know so.
You look good in stripes.
Thanks.
I told the police I don't want Billy to be prosecuted.
In your initial statement, you said Conroy struck you repeatedly and threatened your life.
He was a jerk, um, but I overreacted.
Did you overreact seven months ago, the last time you called 911 on this guy? No.
I wanted to testify, but I never got the chance.
- Why not? - Because you guys decided not to prosecute him.
Did the assigned A.
D.
A.
give you a reason? Billy's one of the top sports agents in the country.
He's rich, knows everyone.
I wasn't exactly shocked that he got away with it.
GORMLEY: Come in.
You wanted to see us, boss? Yeah.
Come in.
Close the door.
Sarge.
What brings you back to the squad? The old man get sick of you? (laughs softly) I missed you guys.
- We miss you, too, Sarge.
- What's up? Sit down.
(clears throat) You know Detective Ray Cross? Yeah.
We-we worked a case with him a while back with the DEA.
Solid cop.
Until he got jammed up last year.
Something about money going missing from an ongoing narcotics operation? Right.
PC let him retire, which he didn't have to do.
A few months ago, we started getting electronic threats against the commissioner.
The content points to Cross.
Threat Assessment usually handles this.
Why you coming to us? This morning, Cross was spotted outside a Manhattan hotel where your old man was having breakfast.
So you think this Cross is serious? I'm not taking any chances, all right? You guys worked with him.
Use that.
I want you to track down Cross, let him know we got eyes on him.
- All right? - Hopefully then, he'll back the hell off.
It'll probably help if we talk to the commissioner.
No, that's not gonna happen.
- Why not? DANNY: Because, knowing my old man, he doesn't want to waste the additional manpower on his own safety, right? Right, so don't go blabbing about this over Sunday dinner.
Yes.
Rattle Cross's cage, quietly.
Would you like some coffee, Ms.
Peterson? Uh, no, thank you.
What's up? A young attorney in my office was sexually assaulted on a blind date.
I'm sorry to hear that.
Her name is Paula Thompson.
She's a lovely person and a sharp lawyer.
A rare combination.
- Has there been an arrest? - Not yet.
I would like you to review the case.
Specifically, this investigating detective.
For? When Paula reported the assault, she met with Special Victims Detective Anthony Palmer, who made her feel like she was the suspect.
Well, not to take sides, but victims of such crimes are often, understandably, emotional and defensive.
Palmer asked her why she went back to this guy's apartment, and whether she'd acted provocatively.
Well, that would be standard, Kelly.
There is a very refined protocol for Special Victims detectives to follow, and it works.
But when any victim of sexual assault is treated as though they were somehow asking for it It would be adding insult to injury.
I completely agree.
As I assume you knew I would.
I don't assume anything.
Okay.
I will drill down on it.
And please send my sympathies and regards to Ms.
Thompson.
She's preparing to file suit against the NYPD.
Look at you, burying the lede.
I convinced her to hold off until I had a chance to speak with you.
Gee, thanks.
Frank.
An assistant corporation counsel suing the NYPD? Nobody wants that.
Not nobody, apparently.
If it can be prevented.
I was happily going to look into this for you.
Now I will just plain look into it.
Thank you.
Blue Bloods 9x02 Meet the New Boss Ray Cross.
Got a second? Well, I'm a little swamped, but I'll see if I can squeeze you guys in.
It's been a few years.
Reagan, Baez.
Dominguez cartel case, 2015.
That's right.
- You did good work.
- You, too.
Ah.
This, uh, threat level's a little lower on this job.
Never saw anybody run a drug case better.
Well, apparently, your old man disagreed.
Yeah.
Must've pissed you off, getting forced out.
I told One PP I had nothing to do with those e-mails.
- Right.
- They made reference to the case you got jammed up on.
A lot of guys got pissed off the way that went down.
But only one guy took the fall.
I got no grudge against the PC.
So what were you doing camped outside the PC's breakfast meeting? Loafer City.
Come again? It's my favorite shoe store.
I got problem arches.
10:07 a.
m.
Well, it's a hell of an alibi.
Sometimes a loafer is just a loafer.
I had no clue the PC was even in the area until I spotted his vehicle.
So we don't have a problem then, right? No problem.
Give my best to your old man.
Martin, you got a second? Sure.
Everything okay? Yeah.
Seven months ago, you handled an assault case against Billy Conroy.
Beat up his girlfriend but walked.
Felt bad for her.
I reviewed the file.
You had plenty of evidence to indict, but you didn't.
It's complicated.
Walk me through it.
The case against Conroy was strong.
In my opinion, he should've been indicted.
So what happened? - I was told to back off.
- By whom? I'd rather not say.
I'd rather be Brad Pitt.
It-It's just, the person involved was they're no longer with us.
Well, if he or she left the office, it should be easier.
She didn't just leave the office.
She left the planet.
Are we talking about Monica Graham? I did what I was told.
And I'm not looking to disrespect her memory, but what happened wasn't justice.
You know why you're here, Detective? C.
O.
said it's about the Thompson case.
I can't say I'm surprised.
Why's that? She's an assistant corporation counsel.
Told me that right up front.
Hmm.
She says you were unprofessional and accusatory, and treated her like the perp.
I can see why it felt that way to her.
So you admit it? No, sir.
But the protocols for questioning a sexual assault victim mean asking questions about the nature of the relationship with the alleged perp.
Which can make a victim defensive.
That's putting it mildly.
Some have come across the table at me.
So is it you or the protocol? The protocol's solid, sir.
And I know you had a hand it writing them.
I'm not blowing smoke.
But the very nature of asking them about their own behavior, I guess it can't help but sting.
Is there a reason why you interviewed her three times and the accused only once? Well, with an emotionally distressed victim, and obviously, most of them are, sometimes multiple interviews are required to get all of the facts in an ongoing investigation.
So, uh, you're saying it was by the book? - Yes, sir.
- Let me ask you, when she told you she was an assistant corporation counsel, you think she was looking for special treatment? No more than anybody.
She expected me to go out and arrest this guy, no questions asked.
And I get it.
In her shoes, I'd want the same thing.
But if you don't do your job, then the D.
A.
's office can't do theirs.
And that's when rapists walk right back out the door.
Thank you very much, Detective Palmer.
The man you're replacing is the final holdover from the last captain.
Heard there were some problems on his watch.
Between you and me, the biggest problem was him.
More concerned with his golf game than this command.
If I may, boss, uh, why me, though, a rookie sergeant? Number one on the Sergeant's Exam, Mayor's Award at the Academy, why not? Especially with two PCs in the family, one the current? Well, it doesn't hurt, no.
But far down the list as to why you.
Okay? Here to help any way I can.
Then let's put the fear of God into these guys.
All due respect, boss, that's, uh, not really my style.
Uh-huh.
It is now.
I'd like to earn their trust, maybe take it from there? Sergeant Reagan, this house is on fire.
Hose it down.
Go from there.
Understood? Yes, sir.
DANNY: What do we got, Detective? - PC is due in 20 minutes.
- Uh-huh.
And look what I found.
Surprise, surprise.
Found him in the park when we were doing our security sweep.
Public park, there's no law against it.
And I took this off him.
Legally registered gun.
Expecting trouble? Dangerous world.
Thank you, Detective.
You know, it's the second time today you've been found in the vicinity of the PC.
We supposed to believe that's a coincidence? Believe whatever you want.
It's a free country.
You willing to come down to squad, answer some questions? - Yeah, it'll be like old times.
- Great.
Let's go.
Thank you.
Sorry to drag you down here.
Done hundreds of these.
First time on the other side.
It doesn't have to be this way, Detective.
I'm not a detective anymore.
PC saw to that.
(laughs): You ran an operation where drug money went missing.
You don't have evidence I took a single dime.
BAEZ: It was your show, your responsibility.
DANNY: That's right, and the PC could have fired you over it, but he didn't.
He let you retire and keep your pension.
Imagine my gratitude.
Look, Ray, whatever your beef is, it's in the past.
Why don't you be smart and leave it there.
You believe in loyalty, Danny? (inhales deeply) Yeah, I believe in loyalty.
My task force made the big cases.
We also took the most casualties.
What are you getting at here, Ray? What I'm getting at, Danny, is if some of the cash belonging to some of the scumbags that killed my people finds its way into the pockets of their loved ones, I can live with that.
Is that what happened? I don't know what you're talking about.
Everyone respects the losses you took.
I'm not so sure everybody appreciates those losses.
Whether you want to believe it or not, my old man mourns the death of every fallen officer in his command.
Eulogies are easy.
Being there after the cameras leave, that's what really counts.
Here's the bottom line.
I don't give a damn what your beef is, just know this.
You want to get to him, you're gonna have to go through me first.
Guess I'll be on my way.
Do yourself a favor.
Stay away from Frank Reagan.
(sighs) (indistinct chatter) Officers, muster up.
I said fall in, move! On my command, open ranks for inspection.
Open ranks.
Move.
- You lose your hat, Officer? - No, Sergeant.
Then cover it now.
Get that hair off your collar.
And lose the red nail polish.
This isn't the junior prom.
What's your hire date? May 2008, sir.
That means no visible tattoos.
I don't want to see it again.
Now, this is what an NYPD officer is supposed to look like.
All squared away.
Well done, Officer Jordan.
Thank you, sir.
My name is Sergeant Reagan.
I'm the new boss.
If you pay me respect, you'll get it back with interest.
If you give me grief, you won't know what hit you.
Any questions? Let's get down to business.
Why would Monica let a serial abuser off Scot-free? She was a good prosecutor.
She must have had her reasons for letting Conroy skate.
I would have charged him with assault two, possibly even attempted murder.
- You disagree? - No.
Now, Monica and I have had our share of run-ins, but when it came to prosecuting crimes against women, she was a bulldog.
So why did she let Conroy walk? Guess we'll never know.
No, that's not good enough.
I know what you're thinking, and it's a bad idea.
You heard A.
D.
A.
Richardson.
He said this wasn't justice.
You really want to start staining her reputation? Look, if Monica had a legitimate reason why she chose not to prosecute, then there's no problem.
If there isn't, then I need to know.
Detective Palmer says he conducted his investigation professionally.
And Paula Thompson says he didn't.
- I spoke to Ms.
Thompson.
- Yeah, I heard.
I have no reason to doubt her version of events.
- Neither do I.
But I also have no reason to doubt Detective Palmer.
Did you speak with any of the other victims who dealt with this guy? The nature of these crimes prevents me from going down that road.
In other words, it's a case of "he said, she said," and, oh, what do you know, he wins.
If you're suggesting that a male cannot work effectively in Special Victims, I have thousands of made cases that say otherwise.
I'm sorry to interrupt, but your detail's out front, and you're running 15 behind.
Nobody is saying that a man can't be a good SVU investigator, but he sure as hell starts with a disadvantage.
Namely? He's not a woman.
Few men are.
Baker, please wait.
Come in for a second.
I think I got the gist.
You take this to its logical extreme, it means that every victim is entitled to an investigating detective who is a gender, racial, ethnic, whatever else you have match.
Which is impossible.
It's the police department, not a college faculty.
But.
Except.
Really? Yes.
There is plenty of good research, not to mention common sense, that says that the female victim in these cases may not be as candid in opening up to a male detective.
And that the male detective may be hardwired with an empathy gap.
Hey, we got a whole lot of made cases from male detectives.
Because you have great cops who work hard to overcome those obstacles.
But there are always exceptions.
The detective in question seemed absolutely transparent when I talked to him, Baker.
The detective was being interviewed by the police commissioner.
Pretty must defines the term "on his best behavior.
" Good point.
Thank you for reminding me.
The real test is that detective's behavior in interviewing a victim of sexual assault.
And your sense is what? Well, I'm not sure.
I wasn't in the room.
But I do think that you need to follow up.
You know, it's just a matter of time before Cross tries again, right? We could put a tail on him.
Come on, the guy's an ex-detective.
He'd make us in a second.
You know, in the old days, someone threatened the PC, my grandfather said they'd handle things "in-house.
" You mean give him a beating? - Got the job done.
- Danny, I know this is personal for you, but going after Cross off the books is not the answer.
It's not that personal, okay? My old man can take care of himself, but I didn't say we should do that.
I'm just saying Okay, we should do it.
Look, the guy's not a typical perp.
He knows everything we know, he's trained the way we're trained.
Not to mention knowing the PC's every move.
Exactly.
He knows the PC's every move.
The public ones, that's easy to find out.
But what about breakfast at a hotel in Midtown? That's confidential.
Only his detail and One PP brass get that schedule.
Exactly.
Well, if an ex-cop knew his way around computers, or knew someone who knew their way around computers, they might be able to figure out how to get access to that information.
(phone ringing) Hey, what do you got? I checked for a connection between Monica and this prick Conroy; there isn't one.
So, why would Monica let Conroy walk? Because Monica had no connection to Conroy, but her boss did.
You mean Chief Assistant Whitney? How's a guy on that salary sit courtside, behind the dugout and on the glass? Tickets from Conroy.
Not just tickets, boxes.
He was paving his way up.
I'm guessing Monica gave Conroy a pass on Whitney's orders.
Why would she do that? Whitney's a backstabbing weasel who likes to get people fired.
Monica knew better than to cross him.
I hope you do, too.
Conroy knows Cara Simpson changed her story.
Why would he confess when he holds all the cards? Because we can bluff.
We can also fold.
I don't fold.
Mr.
Conroy, thank you so much for coming in.
No problem.
I'm not really sure why I'm here.
You're here because beating up women is against the law.
Mr.
Conroy has been charged with no such crime.
Not yet, but after reviewing the facts, I've decided to take this case on personally.
That's your prerogative.
And as bureau chief, I have vast investigative resources.
Look, I-I feel terrible that I frightened Cara.
That wasn't my intention.
What was your intention? - Don't answer that.
- It's okay.
We had an argument.
I lost my temper, but I did not hit her.
So, she gave herself that black eye? BELL: We're here as a courtesy.
If you have something to say I do.
Your client is a serial abuser.
He got away with it once.
It's not gonna happen again.
Okay, let's slow down.
I'm not finished.
Ms.
Simpson has been reluctant to testify.
I intend to change her mind and I can be very persuasive.
So, here's the deal which does expire the moment you leave this room.
Mr.
Conroy will plead to assault in the third degree, agrees to enter counseling and completes a batterer's program.
And if we refuse? Then I charge your client with assault two, indict him and take this case to trial, which I'm sure will be very well-publicized.
(whispering) Your offer is declined.
Send my best to Cara.
Well, so much for bluffing.
This game's not over.
How'd it go with Billy Conroy? ERIN: Chief Whitney.
Uh, not well.
How-how did you know we were meeting? Oh, when you're chief assistant D.
A.
, little birds always seem to find you.
Billy's a good man.
We summer together in Amagansett.
Oh, so you must talk to him all the time.
Yeah, thing is, I like to know when my bureau chiefs dig up old cases.
I wasn't aware of that policy.
I'll have my office set up a lunch.
We can go over the ground rules.
This is new territory, Erin.
Don't want to get off on the wrong foot.
You told the officers that your boyfriend raped you.
Yes.
We were supposed to go to the movies.
Tommy said that he was too tired, so I said that I would go by myself.
He didn't like that.
Hmm.
What happened? He grabbed my arm, threw me on the couch and then he climbed on top of me.
And when I told him to get off, he hit me and then he raped me.
He ever assault you before? He's hit me a few times, but he never forced himself on me.
You ever file a complaint? No.
Does that matter? No.
It's just sexual assault cases involving boyfriends and spouses can get kind of tricky.
Tricky how? Juries rarely convict when the victim has had consensual relations with her assailant in the past.
But I told him no.
No means no, right? Of course.
It's just that the fact is it's harder to convict if it's been yes so many times in the past.
So you're telling me I should just let him get away with it? That's up to you.
But the fact is, unfortunately, he probably will.
Are you sure I can't get you something to drink? No.
I've got everything I need.
(grunting) JAMIE: Hey, hey! What the hell's going on in here? Break it up.
Break it up! Let him go! Let him go.
That's enough! That's enough.
What's this about? Nothing, Sarge.
Everything's fine.
Well, somebody better start talking or you're both looking at suspension.
Like he said, there's no problem.
How come none of you were stepping in? All right, fine.
Well, sitting on your hands gets you written up, too.
Let's go.
Get out.
Get out.
Hey, Jordan.
Not you.
Come here.
I reviewed the record of every officer in this precinct.
A lot of guys with black marks.
You're not one of them.
Thank you, Sergeant.
But that won't last if you start following these guys down the wrong road.
Now what happened here? I'd like to tell you, really But? There's a code in the 2-9.
What happens with the unis stays there.
No ratting to the bosses.
This is the NYPD, not Rikers Island.
Either you come clean or you get dinged.
Better that than getting labeled a snitch.
This lasagna is incredible, Eddie.
Oh, it's my mom's recipe.
It's the only thing I know how to make.
Well, that and margaritas.
(laughter) Everything's great, Eddie, but next time, you know, you can delegate.
We do believe in division of labor here.
Yeah, and it's so good I almost wouldn't mind dish duty.
That's okay, Sean, it's okay.
I can clean up.
No, you've done enough.
Besides, Sean likes to wear the apron.
(chuckles) Well, I want to do it.
Y-You've all been so welcoming to me and I just want you to know I'm-I'm really grateful.
Yeah.
I think this would be a perfect time to call a code blue.
I don't think that's necessary.
I do.
Ah, it's gonna happen sooner or later.
That's right.
Dad? I particularly liked this lasagna.
What's a code blue? It means it's time to talk about your wedding, Eddie.
That's right.
They just got engaged.
Jamie tells us that you want this big church to-do, all the bells and whistles.
- Oh, I don't remember saying that.
ERIN: Great.
That's great.
We're gonna need a huge venue for the reception.
Huge? How huge are we talking? - Really big.
- Yeah, big.
I mean, uh, the police commissioner's guest list alone is gonna be a couple hundred people, right, Dad? Jamie and I haven't made any firm decisions yet.
But that's what family is for.
We're here for you.
Every step of the way.
You're gonna look so beautiful in Mom's dress.
- You're gonna be gorgeous.
- Oh, God.
(overlapping chatter) Mom's dress? The train's kind of long, but once you get moving you'll get used to it.
- This dress is made for you.
- I mean, it's the most beautiful - Perfect.
dress anyone's ever seen.
Stop.
Stop, stop, stop, stop! I'm glad you're all very excited, but this is my wedding.
Ours.
And we're gonna make all the decisions: the flowers, the guest list, dress, band, menu, all of it.
Your job, all due respect, is to show up and have a blast.
If anybody can't live with that, I'll send you pictures.
Okay? Okay.
Brava.
(laughing) - Good for you.
- Well done.
Did I miss something? Reagan family tradition.
Not our kindest.
You see, anyone that marries into the family always starts on their best behavior.
Which gets old fast.
DANNY: Yeah, so then we call a code blue.
We come up with something that's gonna be a sensitive topic for you, then bust your chops about it till your head explodes, which yours just did.
Yeah, and your tantrum was way better than Linda's.
(overlapping chatter) Or Jack's.
(quietly): I can't believe you didn't tell me.
A spouse-to-be is sworn to secrecy.
Well, I think it's sneaky.
HENRY: Yeah, but there's a good reason for it.
We don't stand on ceremony here.
We tell each other the truth.
Sometimes the hard truth, but it's all done with love.
(mouth full): That's right.
And you're a part of that now, Eddie.
Hmm.
So you're saying you don't care if I can cook as long as I can fight? Yeah.
Again, welcome to the family.
(chuckles) Hear, hear.
Cheers.
Cheers.
(laughter) I've just wanted this job for so long.
You know? The chance to put my stamp on the trial division.
And you've earned it.
I think I underestimated the politics.
Anyone I know? Chief Assistant D.
A.
Whitney.
(laughs softly) Okay.
He bullied Monica Graham into letting one of his VIP pals walk on an open and shut assault charge.
And what are you gonna do about it? Walk into Whitney's office, tell him I'm gonna charge the jerk and then probably get demoted or fired.
Then don't do it.
Then what? Eat it? Well, it's one thing to win a job.
It's another thing and a much harder thing to keep it.
And when you say "politics," you mean office politics? Yeah.
Well, what about racial politics? Gender politics? Whitney is a white guy.
Monica was a black female.
So? What are you getting at? Well, I'm just saying, with a guy like Whitney, would this situation be the same situation if Monica were a white guy? Would he still have bullied her? I it's hard to know.
Oh, come on.
What do you think? Probably not, but you can't reverse engineer it that way.
But it is kind of the accepted enlightenment of our age, that everything has to be examined through a whole rainbow of lenses.
These from the same bottle? Yeah.
Then that's very funny, coming from you.
Ronnie, you got a sec? I'll have the guest list for the Gracie Mansion event any minute.
Yeah, that can wait.
These are Detectives Reagan and Baez.
The commissioner's son? Wow, they must be Anyway, can I help you? You're responsible for planning the PC's press avails? 24/7.
(phone chimes) Uh, don't.
The commissioner's schedule is confidential.
You know that, right? Of course.
And you wouldn't e-mail it to anyone else? Absolutely not.
Not even to yourself? GARRETT: That's a breach of protocol.
That schedule's never to be sent to an unsecured account.
I know.
I just I get calls all night long.
Reporters, PR people, Commissioner Moore.
So you forward the PC's confidential schedule to your private cell phone? Just for backup, in case I can't find my work phone.
Ever heard of a hard copy? You mean, like, on paper? We have reason to believe your personal account's been hacked.
Oh, my God.
I'm so sorry.
Am I gonna go to jail? No, you're not going to jail, but you're not gonna be hired for head of security, either.
Could we talk? There's always gonna be beefs, but this code of silence, that ends now.
Respectfully, easier said than done, boss.
All participants in yesterday's incident and onlookers are transferred out as of today.
That sends a message, but, uh, boss, your call-- Officer Jordan is a good cop.
Give him a rip, but I'd like to hold onto him.
, Okay.
Also, One PP approved the list of officers that you recommended from your old precinct.
All five will be reporting as soon as the paperwork goes through.
Hopefully change the culture around here.
Great, boss.
Thanks.
But I think I put six names on that list.
Yeah, one officer will not be coming over, an Officer Janko.
One PP say why? Above my pay grade.
You wanted to see me? - Yes, but I would've come to you.
- That's all right.
I heard it was urgent.
Um, I wanted to discuss Billy Conroy.
Refresh me.
Mr.
Conroy assaulted a young woman seven months ago, Cara Simpson.
He should've been prosecuted, he wasn't, and now he's done it again.
Find out who screwed up, rip him or her a new one.
That is what the bureau chief does.
Right, but I have evidence that someone in the position to do so interceded on Mr.
Conroy's behalf.
Someone from this office.
I see.
I thought it was Monica Graham.
But it wasn't.
No, so I climbed the ladder.
And other than my office, that only leads to one place.
I'm not naming names.
No, but you're not exactly staying silent, either.
No, sir.
Using the power of this office to excuse criminal behavior based on personal relationships is reprehensible.
I agree.
But he won't go quietly.
And he's gonna do a lot of damage on his way out.
Which is why I brought this to you.
If you prefer, I can handle this myself.
But you know, coming from a family of cops, that when you are faced with a bomb, you stand back and call the Bomb Squad.
Or certainly alert them.
(sighs) Thank you.
That your truck? Detective Nuciforo, PC's office.
Commissioner's inside getting a shave and a haircut.
We'll be out of here in ten or 15 minutes.
Ronnie? What the hell are you doing here? Gun! (glass shatters) - On the ground! - Police! Don't move! - Get down! - Gun.
- I got him.
- You all right? Yeah.
Call him a bus.
Hey.
- Hey.
How you doing? - It never ends.
(chuckles) What are you talking about? I asked for specific officers to be transferred to the 2-9, and you were one of them.
Yeah, I heard.
I'm gonna take this straight to my dad.
- This is between him and me.
- No, it's not.
I asked to not be transferred.
You did? Maybe your dad is right about us not working together.
How's that? I worked really hard to be a good cop.
It's something that I did.
It's mine, and I'm proud of it.
I don't want to lose it.
Who says you have to? Look, I fell in love with Jamie Reagan, and the Jamie part's easy.
He's my partner and my lover, my best friend.
But the Reagan part? I might need some distance.
I don't want to disappear.
Well, judging from how you handled that code blue the other night at dinner, I think you're gonna do just fine.
I did kind of destroy you guys.
Yeah, big-time.
Yeah.
I love you.
I love you, too.
You want to frisk me? I'm clean, I swear.
Get in there.
First year on the task force Get your hands up.
we raided this family-run meth lab in East Harlem.
Okay.
(sighs) Six dead, one survived.
It was this eight-year-old kid in superhero pajamas hiding in the closet.
I kind of adopted him.
You talking about Ronnie? Raised him, raised him good, too.
You must've raised him, but he's cleared to work at One PP.
What was he doing, tipping you off about the old man's movements? Look, I should've not have asked him to get me those itineraries.
And when you realized, being the smart cop that you are, you're not gonna get by me.
I told him last night, I'm letting it go.
He take it upon himself to do you a solid? Is that what happened? You wanted to get the old man, but you hit your own boy instead.
What were you thinking? Can I see him? He's cuffed to the bed rail.
Don't think of doing anything crazy.
Go.
I interviewed Paula Thompson again myself.
I also conducted a second interview with Detective Palmer, and I felt that Ms.
Thompson's impressions were confirmed.
May I ask, what was different about your approach that led you to the opposite conclusion? No, you may not.
Detective Palmer will be reassigned out of Special Victims, and I will personally call Ms.
Thompson to give her the news.
And to apologize.
I'm sure she'll appreciate that, as do I.
Well, actually, Detective Baker deserves the credit.
Yes, of course.
Thank you very much, Detective.
And thank you, Frank.
It's a good start.
Okay, look.
I am not about to transfer good, specially trained detectives because of their gender, but what I can do is create a panel to assess Special Victims protocols and recommend improvements.
And I want you to sit on.
Thank you, sir.
And, Baker? That was good police work, Detective.
For a girl.