Come Home (2018) s01e03 Episode Script

Episode 3

1 - I'll always be their mum.
- Well, you've a funny way of showing it.
Walking out, no reason.
Just "Sorry, kids, I feel like a new life".
No reasons?! You go to her, what does that tell me? It tells you she's the mother of my kids.
You still love her, you still have feelings for her.
We have to cut them out of our life.
Garry, Marie -- they're the past.
I love you, Marie.
But I think it's better now if we cut the cord.
- Hi, Billy.
- Marie.
What are you doing here? Laura is yours, Billy.
Ours.
And she thinks another man is her daddy.
My husband is a very violent man.
He's been hurting me and scaring my boy.
- You're coming to my place.
- Don't be ridiculous.
I can't leave you here.
Some weirdo outside, just, like, staring.
Where's Davey? Davey?! I've got you now, sweetie.
It's going to be OK.
Sorry, sorry, not looking.
I have to pee.
Security! You taking drugs in there? - No.
- You got a girl in there with you? No.
Only a really pretty girl was seen coming in here.
Aye, gorgeous she was.
You.
We must stop meeting like this.
How's the car? Still a piece of shit, but it runs.
- Yes, you can buy me a drink.
- Good.
It's great to see you all here today.
What a fantastic turnout.
It's amazing how far people will travel for a bit of free grub and a piss-up.
And to see this gorgeous couple tie the knot.
Ladies and gents, please raise your glass.
A toast to Greg and Marie.
Greg and Marie.
Mmm, you look amazing.
Can we slip away for a quarter of an hour? What'll we do for the other ten minutes? Oh! Ooh! Ooh! Turn to the right for me, please.
And turn to the left for me, please.
And face forward.
I didn't think that it was him.
See, um, my brother's friend had dropped me off.
Dex.
And I thought they'd forgot something .
.
or I opened the door and he just hit me.
Straight in the face.
And you were alone in the house? Yeah, they went out.
They'd gone for some food.
I live with my dad, and my brother, and my little sister.
And your dad's girlfriend and her son? Where is she? I don't want her in my house.
It's not my fault.
Do you mean sorry? Sorry? For what? Not being there? - Well, where were you? - Brenna! - Huh? Where were you?! - Brenna! - Go in.
Go in and get your daughter.
Is everything OK out here? She's HIS daughter.
This one walked out.
Has she told you? Didn't want them any more.
- Mrs Doyle? - Isn't that the truth? Well, perhaps we could have a few words about your husband.
In the car.
Come on.
I haven't done anything wrong.
He's not my responsibility.
- Sweetheart.
- Daddy.
I'm so sorry.
It won't happen again, I promise.
It'll never happen again.
What are they saying? Are they arresting him? He's already been in jail.
Grievous bodily harm.
Possession of drugs.
He's been hanging around the house and you never reported him.
I went to see him, man to man.
He agreed to stop coming.
Right, well, that worked.
Greg, you can see whoever you want, you're single.
Oh, that's big of you.
But bringing this into our children's lives I've brought nothing.
It was a one one-off incident and it will not happen again.
Ever since you left, I've done nothing but protect these kids.
Tell her.
I've been Ma, I've been Da, and they've been fine.
Better than fine.
So don't be about it, Marie.
Seeing her hurt breaks my heart, but it's something no-one expected, and it will not happen again.
No, it won't.
You ready to come home? Molly and Liam will be worried.
I want to stay here.
You don't live here.
Sweetheart, I know this has shaken you up.
I understand that.
It must have been terrifying.
But the police are onto this now and this isn't somewhere you can be.
Your mother isn't Please, sweetheart.
Please.
It's your home.
Your dad's right.
But, um .
.
could you just give us a couple of minutes, darling? I just need to talk to him.
Darling.
And? I want them back.
What? No way.
No way! I've been thinking about it.
No, it's not just tonight.
But this has sealed it.
No! End of discussion.
No.
You left -- too bad.
You made your choice.
Liam, you wouldn't get anyway.
He hates you.
And Molly, not a hope.
So whatever delusions are going on up there, forget about it, Marie.
Forget about it.
I'll see a solicitor.
You see who you like.
No! The answer today, tomorrow, forever is no.
Come on, darling.
We'll go home.
Look, I know it's been hard for you, but you've arguably put your own needs above those of your children.
Your eldest, your son, Liam, he's 17? Yes.
So the court has no jurisdiction over him.
The application would only concern your two daughters.
I understand that.
However, Liam still is an issue, especially if he chooses to stay with your husband because, if there's anything a court doesn't like, it's the separation of siblings.
The positives.
You've been the de facto carer since their mother walked out.
You have a regular job.
You live near the schools.
You're the obvious choice for consistency.
And the negatives? Garry.
Your daughter's been exposed to physical violence whilst in the care of her father and his new partner.
You brought a new woman and her young son into your home with what could seem like undue haste, destabilising an already unstable situation.
- Has he been arrested? - No.
He absconded.
So he's potentially still a threat? Yes, absolutely.
And not only destabilising with this woman, but also bringing violence, fear and anxiety into the home.
She's been good for us.
She loves us.
I'm only telling you the arguments against you.
Have you had any problem with drink? - Nothing serious.
- Drugs? Any incidents that could be seen to affect the welfare of the kids? No.
She couldn't connect with Molly after she was born.
She once told me she hated her and wished she'd die in her sleep so the crying'd stop.
I had post-natal depression.
Marie has a strong case for contact.
She's their biological mother, and they clearly, especially Laura, are displaying a strong need to see her.
However, before you agree to any kind of overnight arrangement, you'd be justified in asking for supervised contact.
Certainly with Molly.
So, if it goes all the way, if it goes to court .
.
how long would that take? It's not quick.
A few months.
We work at the children's pace.
And what would it cost, if that happens? Somewhere in the region of £5,000, if fully contested.
We'd need a portion of that up front.
Right.
Hello, Mum.
You've got a view straight through there with no impediment.
Look right over those The walls are paper thin, it smells of fish and you can't feel your feet in the winter.
Door's open.
I'll follow you down.
Sorry about that.
To what do I owe the pleasure? I need to borrow money.
At least you didn't dress it up.
I know how much you respect honesty.
I'm going to fight for custody.
Well, this is a news flash.
Drink? No, thanks.
I think I need to rent a bigger house.
Something with more bedrooms.
- They're fine where they are.
- Have you seen them? Came a few weekends back.
Stayed in a caravan.
I don't think they need more disruption.
Have a drink.
I'm driving.
So stay the night.
Oh, I'm good.
So you just came for the cheque? Why the change of heart? I just realised I needed them in my life.
What is this, daytime TV? Marie, you've done the hard part, you've left.
So be free.
It's what you wanted.
Why would you get back into all that? What if you can't do it? What if you have another "breakdown"? - What?! - You left your kids.
You couldn't deal with it.
And how is that not a breakdown? Maybe it is, maybe.
Who knows? My only surprise is that you lasted so long.
And now that you're out, you want to throw yourself back in the flames? Have them every other weekend, birthdays, three days at Christmas.
I need £5,000.
You said that, when I left, that you'd help me, financially.
Fine, I'll lend you some money.
Go on holiday, clear your head, then come back and tell me I'm right.
I was a good mum.
I'm not saying you weren't.
Least I didn't take every opportunity to tell my child about her father's indiscretions.
Sordid details no 12-year-old girl should have to hear.
Oh, no, you don't get to do that.
Everyone wants to be a victim nowadays because it makes life easier to explain.
But trust me, I've known you longer than you've known yourself.
And this is you, since you were two years old.
When things got tight, you pressed the eject button, walked away, ran away, lashed out.
And you tried to tame yourself.
Tried to tame yourself with marriage, with kids, with pathetic respectability.
You said you were marrying him and I told you, I told you then you were doing it for the wrong reasons.
And lo and behold, a few years in, the dirty little secret.
You told me to stay.
Yes, for Liam.
And I should have left.
Why? What would that have achieved? Another man, kid shuffling between two homes.
And then a few years down the road, you'd feel trapped again and shoot off in another direction.
Maybe I will have that drink.
You've lied for 15 years about Laura.
You have to tell them the truth.
He's been a good father, Marie.
You can't let him make a fool of himself fighting for a kid that's not his.
How can I? Now what would I say to Laura? I find brutal honesty often works.
Or keep your secret.
Keep the lid on the whole lot.
But let him keep the kids.
Hi, this is Marie.
Leave a message.
I'll call you back.
Marie, it's Greg.
Your solicitor's letter's arrived.
Er, I've spoke to the kids.
They don't want to see you.
Sorry.
I won't be granting contact with Molly.
And so, the following sound .
.
is the sound of a grand's worth of pointless solicitor's fees! Liam! It's going to end up in court, OK? Unless she backs down, we'll have a judge deciding.
Not you, you're old enough to make your own decisions, but your sisters So So I need to ask you a favour.
Please, until this is over, stay with us, stay in the house.
- It'll make a difference.
- Why? So it looks like I'm on your side? Oh, it's not about sides.
It's about .
.
do you think your ma should have Molly? Do you? After all this, after all we've had to endure? You remember the days after -- Molly almost vomiting through tears.
Please, Liam, I'm begging you.
Begging.
Stay with me, a few months, then, after the judgment, do what you want.
I'll stay if she goes.
- Liam.
- No.
That's it.
That's the deal.
Liam! I got us a Danish cos there was no chocolate cake.
Does your dad know you're here? As if! I'll fight for custody.
OK? I just need to know if that's really what you want.
- Yes.
- Do you promise me? Promise.
OK.
This could wind up going to court.
There's something I have to tell you.
You have to hear it.
And .
.
I don't want to hurt you any more.
I've already done enough damage.
And I don't blame you for all those texts and the card you sent me.
What card? The Mother's Day card.
It said "fuck you" on it.
And all the texts.
I didn't send them.
Laura, I wouldn't blame you if you did.
Are you telling me you've got texts from my phone with "fuck you" written in them? Yeah.
I I mean This isn't me.
- I I didn't send these.
- Would Liam have? No.
Liam w Liam wouldn't do that.
It could only be Dad or Brenna.
It's Brenna.
It's her.
I know it's her.
How could she? How many did she send? A lot, but I'm just glad it wasn't you.
And all this time, you thought they were from me? Mummy, you have to get us out of there.
I, I don't even know why he's with her.
Can we please, please not just stay with you now? Darling, your dad's not going to accept that.
Look, we're going to do this right.
OK? We have to go through the proper channels.
You just have to be patient.
Good luck to him.
She can be his new family because none of us are going to be there.
What did you want to talk about? Let's talk about it later, OK? You're late.
Where have you been? Grab some lasagne.
Are you OK? Can I borrow your phone? - Why? - Cos I want to text Garry and tell him what a twat he is! - Laura.
- And I want to tell him that wherever he is, to fuck off and that I hate him! - Laura.
- Because that's what you do, isn't it?! When you want somebody out of your life?! You text them from somebody else's phone! - I've no idea what you're on about.
- Bullshit.
I have no idea what she's on about.
Tell them.
Messages to our mum.
Tell them.
Davey, help your mummy.
Laura! What the hell! It started three minutes ago.
We're fine.
We're fine.
Come on.
My client has been the sole carer of all three of the family's children for the past 13 months, and there are very real child protection issues in this case with regard to Mrs Farrell's destructive impulses.
There are absolutely no welfare risks whatsoever associated with this mother.
And those concerns of the past can be properly safeguarded by allowing Marie access, initially, in a contact centre environment.
It's my view that the case be referred to the Court Children's Officer.
Following the CCO's investigation, we will list the case for a contested hearing on the issue of residence.
Now, if you were on this desert island, who would you like to have on the desert island with you? Would you like to see your mummy? And what do you most like to do with her? I want to go swimming and play with her hair.
Is there anyone else you'd like to bring on the island with you? Is there .
.
anything that makes you scared? Are you asking about me being beaten up in my own house? Do you feel able to talk about that? So you're definitely leaving home, then? Yeah, I've already started looking at house shares.
So once I get the money sorted I'm outta there.
- Won't you miss your sisters? - No, I'll see my sisters.
Good luck deciding.
Deciding Whether they live with the bitch that walked out or the bitch that moved in.
Julie, I'm Daddy.
- Do you remember me? - No.
I'm your daddy.
Do you understand? But I miss you when you're not at home.
Well, it's just the way it is.
- Are you doing well at school? - Mm-hmm.
Hi.
Greg Farrell.
This is Molly, here to see her ma.
Hello, Molly.
Welcome.
Is she here yet? Yes, she's waiting inside.
And will there be people in there watching her? There's our volunteers in the room, but Marie will be attending to Molly's needs.
So she won't be able to walk out with her? No, that won't happen.
And she's sober? - Brenna.
- Greg, the last time she saw her she went out and got steaming drunk and ended up in A&E.
We don't allow contact if there's any sign of alcohol being consumed.
Molly, would you like to see your mummy? Play with some toys? Come on, I'll take you through.
Hi.
How you doing, beautiful? It's so good to see you.
I missed you.
I missed you, too.
Thank you.
So, was it a lady or a man? A lady.
And where did you talk to her? In the classroom but everyone else had gone out for break.
Did you mind not getting to have your break? No, not really.
They gave me biscuits.
When can we go swimming? Do you want to go swimming? Why do we not do it any more? Right, it's your turn.
But do this one with your eyes closed.
Easy.
So there's good news and bad news.
The CCO report recommends consistency for Molly to stay with Greg.
And, er, a shared care arrangement in respect of Laura.
OK.
What's the good news? It's a recommendation.
Listen, I'm not going to lie to you, it carries weight, and if you want to look at this as the way the wind's blowing then fine, opt out, save your money, but if you're asking me can you still win this case, then my answer is yes.
And here's why.
You have a problem.
A very significant problem.
How well do you know your new partner, Mr Farrell? Why do you ask? Hiya.
Do you want a coffee? No, thanks.
What's up? I've just come from the solicitor's.
And? She's had the CCO report.
The, er, safeguarding checks have thrown up an issue.
What issue? Brenna, why didn't you tell me? What? What issue, Greg? Domestic violence.
You against Garry.
Police involved.
I know what you're going to say, "I was protecting myself.
" But they'll twist it round .
.
say you're a violent partner, make it look like the kids are in danger and they'll be better off with Marie.
Greg, that is shit, and you know it.
The court'll know.
He complained about me to deflect from himself.
Of course I hurt him.
What was the option, lie there and get kicked? How did we meet? Me and you? Mid-fight, me and Garry, and if you hadn't have come in I'd have punched and kicked my way out of there.
What else did they say? What did they recommend? Did you send those texts? From Laura's phone? What did they recommend? I need to know.
Yes.
Why? Isn't it obvious? I want her out of our lives.
Because .
.
I want you .
.
and she's I'm sorry.
Bren .
.
all these things .
.
Garry, texts, the violence, it's making things hard for me.
.
.
Garry, texts, the violence, - The report goes in my favour, you know, but - What? My solicitor asked me a question.
She asked me .
.
"How serious is your new relationship?" She said, at court .
.
as a single parent, no other baggage .
.
I'd have a better chance of success.
And what was your reply? I told her, "I love my kids more than anything in the whole world.
" So you want me to leave, is that it? You, you want me out of your life? Brenna .
.
I grew up in a happy home -- safe, protected -- that's all I wanted for my kids.
Same as I had.
I can't lose those girls, it'll kill me.
Well, I'll be here, Greg, by your side, through all of this.
But you need to decide.
Marie.
Let me guess, you want the money.
Yeah, I do.
But there's something else I wanted to ask.
When I go would you be there for me? Please leave your message after the tone.
Brenna, I'm sorry.
Come home.
I need you here.
You put the smile back on my face.
Thanks for coming.
Well, I'm your mum, aren't I? I did leave my children.
I didn't put them first.
I was selfish and I massively regret that.
But, at that time, I felt trapped.
I couldn't cope.
I-I felt like I couldn't breathe.
And I had to get away.
I wasn't available for them.
So I thought it was better for them not to see me that way.
I'd had post-natal depression a few years before.
I felt worthless, I felt irrelevant.
But since then, I've been able to get help.
I've attended counselling, I've found fulfilling work, and I've more recently been seeing my daughters and rebuilding the the strong bond that we always had.
I'm fully committed to being their mother again.
And, just for clarity, when you say you felt trapped, like you couldn't breathe, what do you mean by those phrases? The marriage I was in.
My husband's attitude towards me .
.
his controlling nature .
.
his old-fashioned views of .
.
what a wife should be.
I love my children, but .
.
I had other ambitions, I had other things I wanted to do.
I felt trapped into being the the maid and the cook and the person that does everything for everyone, with no-one asking me what my needs were.
- Are you in a new relationship at the moment? - No.
- But your husband is in a new relationship? - Yes.
Do you know his partner, Brenna Doyle? I know she's brought a lot of trouble into the home.
A lot of trouble for my kids.
I want to protect them from that.
I want to get them under my wing again.
I would like to believe the maternal protector image you've painted for the court, Mrs Farrell, but as recently as March this year, you were admitted to hospital after being run over by a car whilst inebriated.
Isn't that correct, Mrs Farrell? Yes.
In fact, you had drunk so much you had to undergo a stomach pump procedure, isn't that correct? Yes.
And you'd experienced that before, hadn't you, Mrs Farrell? Yes, a while ago.
On that occasion, you'd mixed alcohol and pills, hadn't you? - Yes.
- You'd tried to take your own life.
And this is when your daughter, Molly, was under a year old.
She was, in fact, under your care at the time, in the house, asleep.
The day you fell in front of the car was the same day that you appeared, without warning, at Mr Farrell's house, wasn't it? When you arrived at the house, Mrs Farrell, had you consumed drugs and alcohol? - Marijuana.
- Marijuana?! So under the influence of drugs, you turned up, unannounced.
You upset Molly, then you fled to the pub, drank to oblivion and fell in front of a fast-moving vehicle.
Protector? It was Mother's Day.
I was upset.
It was a one-off.
Did you use an internet app that evening for a date, Mrs Farrell? Yes.
And the man that you met that evening, for the date, did you have sex with him, Mrs Farrell? Objection.
This line of questioning is not relevant.
Sustained, unless you're going somewhere in terms of the children.
You said a while ago that your leaving was for your children.
But isn't it the truth, Mrs Farrell, that you left for yourself? You left so that you could have a second youth, drinking, smoking drugs, having sex with men as and where you choose? No, you you you weren't up here.
You don't understand the chaos of my mind at that point.
- I was having a breakdown.
- Mrs Farrell, it's hardly a defence that you were having a breakdown.
No! He trapped me! I didn't want a third child.
And he trapped me with his lies.
Liam was 11, Laura was eight.
Our baby days were behind us.
And I told him that I didn't want any more.
And he agreed.
And he said he would have a vasectomy.
So he went and he had it, and he came back and he pretended it was the most painful thing that he'd ever been through.
He lied.
And when we started having sex again, um .
.
we didn't use anything.
Why would we? So what happened? Molly happened.
It's not that I don't love her, I I love her now, but then it felt like the end of my world.
Another 15 years of being that person.
- Oh, a mother? - No! His slave! Tied to the house, the woman at home! He didn't care what I wanted! All he wanted was a version of his mother! I tried to tell him so many times how unhappy I was, and he didn't care.
When he finally realised I was serious .
.
he trapped me with his lies.
Were you faithful during your marriage, Mrs Farrell? - Mostly.
- Mostly? Well, surely faithful implies fidelity, and that's something you can't claim, is it? Is this relevant? Please answer the question, Mrs Farrell.
Yes, I was faithful in my marriage.
You're a liar.
What do you want me to say? Tell the truth.
How's that going to help? I thought that's what this was about.
Your truth, his truth, and letting them decide what's best for the kids.
I thought that was the point of this circus.
Tell Greg about Laura.
Are you out of your mind? No, my mind is clear.
Sitting in there, listening to you.
You're a liar.
And before you get anywhere near those kids again, you need to do the right thing.
You won't? Fine, I will.
- No! Mum For God's sake - You had your chance.
Listen, will you just go home and let me? I'm telling him! What's going on? - I need to see Greg.
- No.
I need to see him.
There's something I need to tell him.
Marie wants a word with Greg.
Regarding? It's personal.
Fine.
You tell him, you tell me.
Concerns our daughter.
- Right, OK.
- She stays.
Please? Yeah, OK.
- I did have an affair.
- I know.
You know? What do you mean, "concerns our daughter"? It's about Laura.
It's Sh Sh-she's mine.
I'm so sorry.
Fuck off! I'm sorry I didn't tell you.
Fuck you! Greg Adjourn.
I need to adjourn.
- Hi, Daddy.
- Hey, sweetheart.
- Can I show you something? - Yeah.
What Time Is It, Mr Wolf? That was your favourite.
Used to creep up behind me, slowly, slowly, and I'd jump out, chase you up the garden.
You'd die giggling.
That was when you broke your arm on holiday.
Half the night in A&E.
It was Liam's fault.
Idiot.
First day of school.
You were so scared, pretending not to be.
Then you came home full of it.
Couldn't wait to go back.
Why are you showing me these? I look at you and all I feel is love.
Fierce love.
The little girl I loved from that moment .
.
and will always, always love.
I love you too, Daddy.
For 15 years, you've lied to your husband.
For 15 years, you've allowed him to think that the child was his.
The ramifications of that lie are massive, aren't they? And how will the other children react? Molly, a child who already has emotional difficulties from her mother walking out.
Och, it really is a mess.
And it was your deceit that caused this mess, wasn't it, Mrs Farrell? I fell in love.
Love? You had an affair.
And after that affair burned itself out, you had a child, and Mr Farrell has been a loving father to that child.
Why? Because he is her father, her protector.
And will you not admit, hand on heart, that it is in her best interests for that to continue? Mr Farrell, look, no-one in this court's going to suggest it was easy having to look after three children without your wife, but .
.
you formed a new relationship very quickly, didn't you? Within weeks of meeting your current partner, you'd moved her into the family home with her ten-year-old son, Davey.
That's correct.
But you didn't undertake any welfare checks on the people you welcomed into your home, did you? And how did that work out, Mr Farrell? What happened to Laura? - You know what happened.
- Yeah, she was attacked.
A 14-year-old girl was ferociously attacked by Ms Doyle's ex-partner who you had brought to your own door.
Isn't it the case, Mr Farrell, that as long as you have this woman living in your home, your home is not a safe place to be? He could return? No, cos if he came back, he'd be arrested.
Brenna's a good woman.
She's caring, she's funny.
She's been brilliant with my kids.
She's made every effort with my children and they all love her.
I'm afraid that just isn't true, Mr Farrell, because your eldest child, Liam, has moved out of the family home, into rented accommodation, explicitly because of your relationship with Brenna Doyle.
And your daughter was the victim of a malicious attempt by Ms Doyle to poison my client against her daughter by sending foul-mouthed text messages.
"Fuck you", "I hate you.
" It's unpleasant to hear out loud, isn't it? You were aware of your girlfriend's actions, weren't you, Mr Farrell? No.
And I've told her I disapprove.
It was an error of judgment.
Let's be honest.
It was a deceitful, manipulative form of control.
- Something not unknown to yourself.
- Objection, Your Honours.
- .
.
Inappropriate accusation.
- Stop with your line of questioning.
I'll stop.
But if you had allowed Marie more freedom, or the help she craved, perhaps she wouldn't be forced to walk out on her children, walk out to save herself.
She wasn't a slave.
We made a choice to have children, together.
I went out to work, earned the money.
Marie looked after the children.
But choices have to be made.
All families make 'em.
You pick roles.
Why didn't you go through with the vasectomy, Mr Farrell? I wanted to keep my family together.
I was thinking of my other children.
Marie's very volatile, emotional, hormonal.
I thought having another child would calm her down, bond us together.
You made a judgment on something of that magnitude.
You tricked her into having another child, didn't you, Mr Farrell? She loves Molly.
She was a good mother, wasn't she, Mr Farrell? - For all those years she was a good mother to your children.
- I I had some concerns about her.
I-I was sometimes scared for her, that she'd hurt herself.
She did her best.
The reason she walked out wasn't because she didn't want her children.
The reason she walked out was because she wanted to be a better person.
Free from the chains of a marriage where she wasn't appreciated, where you made the decisions.
She looked at her life through the haze of depression and knew action had to be taken.
She endured the shame and the judgment of the mother who leaves, an act fathers do so regularly it has become the norm, but she endured the looks and the comments of other people, and has emerged the other side a more resilient person, ready to embrace motherhood again.
Her calm home is in stark contrast to the violent and controlling home that you offer those children.
- Isn't that the truth of this case, Mr Farrell? - No.
It's not.
You seeing me differently? - He's twisting everything.
I sound like a tyrant.
- Yeah.
I told you, I'm by your side.
- How long does it usually take? - Not long.
They pretend to be weighing the issues, but they're really having a brew and a Kit Kat.
- OK.
- They're ready for us.
Here we go.
All rise.
I am concerned with an application with regard to two children, namely Laura and Molly Farrell.
It is our decision that the children reside with their mother, Marie.
And that weekend contact be granted to their father, Greg.
That's ridiculous! If you yell out again, you will be asked to leave.
This is our judgment.
Please absorb it and our reasoning will follow.
- Thank you so much.
- (You're welcome.
) (You've earned it.
) I wonder, um Would it be possible for me to speak to Greg alone? Yeah, of course.
You happy now? I'm sorry about Laura.
- I didn't want it to come out like that.
- I want to tell her.
Me.
I want to tell her I'll always be her daddy.
Cos I've been there, loved her, protected her.
And he Greg, Greg I never knew how much you hated me.
Did you ever love me? Yes.
Yes, I did.
I loved you.
Greg We don't have to do what they say.
They're our children.
You're their daddy.
We can share them.
We can take them half the time each, and take all the hate out of it.
But you won.
We both lost.
How did we get here? I don't know.
Blue jean baby LA lady Seamstress for the band Pretty eyed Pirate smile You'll marry a music man Ballerina You musta seen her Dancing in the sand And now she's - This is from Kung Fu.
- Kung Fu.
Ready? Her favourite show of the '70s.
When you can snatch the pebble from my hand Stop filming.
Stop filming! Stop it! Lay me down in sheets of linen You had a busy day today