Mrs Biggs (2012) s01e05 Episode Script

Episode 5

Jesus! I don't think I've ever met anyone like you.
Welcome to the family, Mrs Biggs.
He's a degenerate!! What will become of you?!! How could you, Ron? How could you risk everything? Our whole lives.
The future's full of possibilities.
That past will only drag us down.
I'm arresting you for robbery and conspiracy to rob.
A new life, Charm.
We'll go somewhere no-one will find us.
Where we can be a proper family again.
Daddy's had to go away, because the police discovered where we live.
And he'll need some socks.
And a bow tie.
You're so clever.
It doesn't make any difference to us.
Whatever happened in the past is in the past.
Thanks, Craig.
I've booked a passage on a liner to Panama and from there I'll make my way overland to Rio de Janeiro.
We have something between us that can't be beaten or broken, Charm.
'It looks on tempests and is never shaken.
' You're my whole world.
I was dreaming about you last night.
You'd just been born, and when Dad saw you, he started to cry.
Was he sad? No, he was crying because he was happy.
People can cry when they're happy too.
You look so much like him now.
What are you doing? Writing a poem for school.
Can I see it? You're taking a lot of trouble with it.
Not till I've finished.
I wonder when those lazy brother of yours are going to get up.
Dad said in his last letter he's found some work.
Do you think you'd like to live in South America? He says the people are very friendly there.
Or would it be too hard to leave all your school friends? I want to live where Dad is.
Hey, hello, my friend.
Hello, Mr Mike.
Anything for me? We have a money order from Australia.
And this morning, a letter arrived to my house.
Adaulto, you don't know how happy you've made me.
So what does he say? He says the work comes in fits and starts.
Because he has no permit, he can only take on casual jobs.
"If it wasn't for the money you send me, I think I'd be out on the streets.
" I hate to think of him out there all on his own.
In his last letter, he said he was sure he could use your passport to re-enter Australia.
A bit too soon, isn't it? I wrote and told him that.
I said maybe this time next year.
I just don't know if he can wait that long.
The boys miss him so much.
Nicky, especially.
And the worst thing is, he's better off without us.
We're his greatest danger.
Children, out with the bags.
I'm taking you on holiday next time.
Once we've saved up for the motor.
Yes.
With the move, we're broke at the moment.
Don't be silly, it was nice to have the company.
See you soon.
Bye.
Goodbye, you.
Thanks again.
Bye, darling.
Bye-bye! In you get, Twiz.
You're going.
See you soon.
Seat belt on, please, Nickpops.
So who's hungry? Yeah? Oh Hey, baby.
Val, get Twiz.
Nicky? Good boy.
It's all gonna be OK.
Nicky? Who's a brave boy? Are you OK? All right? Oh, God.
Good boy.
Twiz, does it hurt anywhere? My back.
OK, the ambulance will be here soon.
OK? What's the matter with Nicky? Nicky? Nicky? Nicky? You OK? Oh, God! Val! Take the baby.
Be a brave boy and go with Auntie Val, OK? Nicky? Nicky, can you hear me, love? Come on, mate, come on, mate.
Are you calling an ambulance? I think his eye's OK, Charm.
It's just a nasty gash.
Hold on, my darling, please hold on.
What's going on? Move the car! Move! Sick boy here! Charm? Charm? He's dead, isn't he? He's dead, isn't he? He was dead on arrival.
There was no hope in resuscitating him.
I'm so sorry.
No! Read it to me please, Joan.
It's the last thing he wrote.
"Lonely was Ned Kelly, lonely am I.
In a crowd of other people, lonely as a wife without a husband, lonely as a lost child in the street, lonely as a parent without a child.
" That's beautiful, Charm.
It's all in there.
We ruined his little life.
No, Charm, you can't think like that.
He missed his dad so much.
He loved his life.
He loved you, he loved his brothers.
He was a bright, happy little boy.
I had such hopes for him.
I couldn't go to university but I was determined he'd go in my place.
He was so talented, Joan.
And now he's gone.
Oh, God, how am I gonna tell his father that he's gone? Yo yo? A letter arrived at my house this morning.
I had a feeling I'd hit the jackpot today.
My darling wife, my poor sweet love.
All the bitterness and anger in the world won't bring our little Nick back to us.
He was a happy chap and he gave us many happy memories.
Let us use them.
I don't want to mourn any more because that belongs to the dead.
I want to feel joy in my heart whenever my thoughts turn to the little boy we called Handsome Harry, Nickpops and even Sherbie Dab.
I don't believe he has gone anywhere.
I know he is part of me and he's with me with his trains and his Lego and shining morning face.
Wherever I go, I'll always have him with me.
Now I won't know who to thank.
I've been getting a lot of letters from strangers.
I hope you're not reading them.
Someone sent one the other day saying they were glad my son was dead, that it was justice for all the wicked things my husband has done.
There's even been vile letters addressed to the boys.
Such ugliness in people's souls.
Sometimes I despair.
I'm thinking of going back to study.
Full-time? You've got no mortgage and I suppose, financially, you could just about handle it.
I need to be doing something that stretches me.
Taking up a degree as a single mother would certainly stretch you.
Be careful it doesn't break you.
What does Ron say about it? That's the worst bit.
I don't know.
Are you still writing to each other? His letters have dried up.
I just don't know how he's coping.
Fuck.
Sorry.
Excuse me? Hello! Jesus! What do you have to do to get a drink in this bloody joint? It's a long time since I've heard an accent like that.
Cerveja, por favor.
And for my amigo.
Hi, I'm Constantine.
My friends call me Conti.
I'm Ooh, what am I today? Oh, yes.
Roy Keynes.
How do you do? And the answer to your question is "starting".
You're wondering, from the state of me, if I'm starting or finishing my evening.
That suits me fine because I'd like to get absolutely legless tonight.
Spoken like a gentleman.
Here's um 120 cruzeiros - all my worldly goods.
Let's see how far that gets us.
Dear Charmian, Gillian and I read of the terrible news of the death of poor Nicky.
We have not stopped crying and cannot imagine what you must be going through.
It occurred to me that you might need the enclosed now that you have to support the boys on your own.
All my love, Mum.
I'm sure you know I have an unusual background.
I know who you are, Mrs Biggs, and I'm not interested in any of that.
What I am interested in is your ability as a student.
As you can see, I have all the necessary academic qualifications.
I was even offered a place at Birmingham University, which I was unable to take up.
Yes, but that was 13 years ago.
I assume you haven't been keeping up your studies for the last 13 years? No, I've been raising a family.
Eight GCE O levels, two A levels: English Literature and French.
You are amply qualified.
But I question why you'd want to put yourself through this a mature-age student with young children to support? Sir, I can't promise I will graduate.
But I can promise I will give you my absolute all.
I recently lost my son.
He was only ten but already he was showing great promise.
And it was my dearest wish that he should go to university to study for the degree that I missed out on.
Now that we've been granted leave to stay in Australia, I would like to do this for him.
So now you're not hungry? No.
Come on, Twiz.
If I don't know what's wrong, how can I help you? Please tell me what's wrong, darling.
You can tell me anything, you know that.
They said I'll have to go to prison when I grow up.
Who did? Douglas and Gordon.
Those little shits.
On your back the whole time, I've been down to that school about them already.
They said because Dada's been in prison, when I grow up, I'll have to go to.
Darling, look at me.
Listen.
You won't have to go to prison.
You've done nothing wrong.
Dad's coming home, isn't he? I hope so, Twiz.
When he does, I've got all his tools ready for him.
Well, that's good.
He'll like that.
You tell those boys your dad is not a bad man.
He did what he did for us.
Who is it? Hey, Charm, it's me.
Craig.
Can I come in? It's so great to see you.
I haven't seen you in ages.
No.
Congratulations on getting into uni.
What are you studying? At the moment, English, Early British, French and European History.
Wow.
That's a lot on your plate.
That's great.
It's so good to see you.
It's good to see you too.
I think about you all the time.
How's Lindy? Um things aren't going so well at the moment.
A lot of arguing.
She can be a very difficult woman to live with.
Oh.
That's a shame.
So I wondered if um maybe you fancied coming out for a meal.
As families? No, just you and me.
Is that a good idea? Well, I want you to know that I'm I'm going to ask Lindy for a divorce.
You seem so happy together.
It's a bit difficult with three people in a relationship.
Three? Who? Come on, Craig.
You can't say that to me.
You must know how I feel about you.
I'm married.
Only in name.
Look, Ron isn't here for you, Charm.
I am.
He hasn't been for a long time.
I'm flattered, Craig.
Honestly, I am.
But in spite of everything that's happened, I'm still Ron's wife.
Saude! Wa-hey-hey! Whoo-hoo! What did she say? She said if you want to put your hand there, fine, but if you leave it there, it's another matter.
What's the form with these girls, then? They're not whores.
They're good-time girls.
They like to be taken out by a good-looking guy and given a present.
Take them shopping, buy them some clothes or something.
Who is the third that always walks beside you? When I count, there is only you and I together.
But when I look ahead up the white road, there is always another one walking beside you.
Eliot is referencing here the account of an actual Antarctic expedition where the explorers in their exhaustion have the delusion that there's always one more of them than could actually be counted.
Eliot originally considered titling the poem Charmian, hey! You said bring them if I couldn't get a babysitter.
Come in.
It's OK.
I'll see you at uni tomorrow.
Don't be silly.
Come on.
Love to meet you.
Come on.
So, who here can eat the most chocolate cake? Me, easily.
He's only four.
But because he's four he's cuter.
Aren't you? Yes.
All right, eat up.
Come on.
No hiding away.
I feel so old.
I'm actually not that old but I feel ancient tonight.
Don't be daft.
You look great.
I think I must be a terrible mother, bringing them to a party.
Loud music and booze.
And other things.
I just had to get out of the house.
Things were starting to close in on me a bit.
You know, I really admire you, Charm.
It's not easy being you.
The boys help concentrate my mind.
Studying hard so I can get a good job at the end of this.
I need to support them.
It's so shitty they can't see their dad.
Can't you just sneak off one weekend? Take them to see him? I wish I could.
But I have no idea where he is.
What? I'm coming.
All right, all right.
All right, all right! All right, hold your horses.
Raimunda I need to speak to you.
This is my new apartment.
How the hell did you find it? How did you get a new apartment? Oh, you know.
I had some jobs come in.
I decided to take the plunge.
I may be on my arse again next No, don't go in there, Raimunda.
Calm down, OK? She must go! Don't slam the door! Shit.
Look, come on, Raimunda.
I told you, I don't want a relationship.
Then why do you keep fucking me? Well, that's It Because I'm weak.
But I'm with Lucia now.
No.
She must go.
Why? Because I'm pregnant.
I mean, she's crazy.
How can she possibly prove it's mine? I told her I'd pay for her to go and see the nurse and get rid of it but she just sits there watching TV and shouting at me in Portuguese.
I can't get her out of the apartment.
It's a fucking nightmare.
To tell you the truth, Conti, I've had enough.
I'm sick of bumming around here.
I miss my family.
Listen, I was thinking, mate.
When you take your trip back to London, try and put some feelers out for me.
See if you can find a journalist interested in coming out and doing my story.
Isn't that a bit risky? I just want to score one last payday for Charmian and the boys.
You know, if it gets me rumbled, well All the other train robbers have done deals on their sentences.
Bruce, Charlie, Buster At least I'd have a clean conscience knowing my family were looked after.
Is it ready yet? Go and wash your hands, please.
They're clean.
Wash your hands and go and get your brother.
Come here.
Are you all right? Stop it.
Get in the car.
Get in the car! Charm, I'm so sorry.
She followed me.
That could have hit my son! You keep away from my husband! Lindy.
I'm not doing anything with him.
Is that what he's told you? Look, I will pay for the window, OK? What is wrong with you? Leave me alone! And you stay away from him! Just shut up, for God's sake! I'm not doing anything with him! I don't want your husband! I just want my own! Get in the car.
Get in the car Ron, this is Colin MacKenzie from the Daily Express.
Pleased to meet you, Mr Biggs.
I have to say No offence, Constantine.
But at the back of my mind, I couldn't get rid of the idea that this was some sort of hoax and we'd never actually get to see you.
Well, it's me all right and, for 35 grand, I'm all yours.
So, what do you want to ask me? Well, I suppose we should go back to the beginning and ask where it all began.
May I? Where it all began Well, I suppose you could say it all began with a girl on a train.
I was in love.
The only time I've ever truly been in love.
It was for the price of a deposit on my house.
That's why I got involved.
Make sure you get that bit in.
And sod's law, I won that amount anyway on the horses the week before the job.
But I'd met the old man when I did some renovation work on his house.
And then Bruce said they needed a train driver.
Unfortunately, when the time came he couldn't move it down the track.
But he still got his money.
I couldn't imagine being locked up for 30 years.
There was no parole back in those days.
Wandsworth was supposed to be impregnable but the escape was straightforward.
Melbourne.
That was the happiest time.
All the money from the robbery had gone and we were just a young couple raising our kids off the back of our own hard graft.
You were working on a construction site at this time? That's right.
Yeah, they promoted me to foreman.
They said I was trustworthy.
Come on, then.
Let's get back down to work.
The train driver was hit once.
That's all.
Jack Mills hurt himself as he fell rather than from a blow by any of us.
Who hit him? Well, I can't give you his name.
He's never been caught.
You're telling me there is a Great Train Robber who's never been caught? More than one.
There was three of them.
That's incredible.
Yeah.
And there's one other guy.
Billy Boal, God rest his soul.
He went down for it and died in prison but he had nothing to do with it.
It's an abso Hello, Ron.
Long time no see.
I think you remember me.
And I certainly remember you.
And you're nicked.
What is it? We're from the Daily Express.
I've got nothing to say.
Especially at this time in the morning.
Are you mad? We've come here to tell you something.
It's about Ron.
What's happened? He's been arrested.
In Rio.
He was living there under the name of Mike Haynes.
Oh, God.
Er, here, you'd better take these inside.
Get it? Yeah.
Obrigado.
Hello.
What do you want? Did you go and see the old nurse? About the baby.
Oh, thank God.
Listen, Raimunda, sweetheart.
I've been speaking to some people in here.
And there might be a way we can help each other.
But we have a seat booked for him on a flight out of here tonight.
This has all been discussed at diplomatic level.
My instructions are that the prisoner is to remain in our custody until further notice.
I'm sorry, Chief Superintendent Slipper.
Bloody hell! Charm, take my advice and don't do a deal with any of the papers.
If they want to do a story about you, accept flights and hotel expenses by all means but no fee.
Another pay day might turn the public against you and you have to think about the boys.
Why would he have done such a thing? Why take the risk of meeting a journalist out there? He must have known what might happen.
There's something you should know, Charm.
We're getting information about a Brazilian girlfriend.
Raimunda de Castro.
She's apparently campaigning for his release.
So am I to be dispensed with? Is that why he hasn't been writing to us? Because he's shacked up with some woman out there? Oh, my poor sweet darling.
My poor sweet darling.
You look great, Charm.
If you'd given me some warning, I could have lost a few pounds.
You don't need to lose anything.
You look gorgeous.
Why did you do it, Ron? Why take the risk? I suppose I I'd had enough.
I was going to earn one last payday for you and the boys and then I was ready to turn myself in.
But the Daily Express double-crossed me.
They got the story but they didn't pay me.
Why didn't you write to me? I kept meaning to but it was It was just too painful.
So you left me to grieve for our son on my own? I'm so sorry.
You know, for a long while it's felt like I've been slowly dying out here.
You still found time to take up with a girlfriend.
Who is she? Raimunda.
Do the boys and I not figure in your plans any more? Of course you do.
Why are the press making a fuss of her? Just don't knock her too hard cos she might just be my ticket out of here.
What do you mean? Well, you see, she's um She's pregnant.
What? Hold on.
Just Look Look, I'm not even sure it's mine.
But the thing is, if we can persuade the Brazilian authorities that it is, then there's a good chance they won't deport me.
They won't deprive a child of its parent.
Raimunda's up for it if I look after her financially.
You mean you could stay here openly? A free man.
And I could come and join you with the boys? No more hiding, Charm.
We can live as husband and wife again.
But what? What's the catch? Before any of that can happen, my poor darling, you're going to have to divorce me.
Now, look, it's only for appearances.
So the Brazilians can think I'm serious about bringing up this baby.
It's a Catholic country.
You want me to divorce you? But we can get married again when it's all died down.
It's just a short-term fix, my darling.
What would the boys think? This way gentlemen, please.
What's going on here? Can we have some privacy? It is a press conference.
And what about the stories that one of the reasons you might stay here is because of your relationship with this girl Raimunda? Are they true? Well, the fact is, she has lived with me for more than a year.
And I've a great amount of affection for Raimunda.
But my children will always be a part of my life and so will Charmian.
Raimunda! Come on Are you going to stay in Brazil? Thank you.
Thank you.
What are you gonna do next? I love you.
I do.
Mr Biggs! Mr Biggs! Mr Biggs! Oh, for fu Mum? Hi.
It's me, Charmian.
Charmian? Is that really you? How are you, Mum? How's Gillian and the boys? Dad? Oh, er Everyone is fine here.
Oh, it's so good to hear your voice.
Can you speak? Yes.
Your father's out.
I guess he would be at this time.
I've thought about you a lot, Charmian.
I prayed for you every night, after you lost poor Nicky.
I don't know how I got through it.
So many times I wished I could talk to you and ask your advice.
Not that you'd have paid any attention to it.
Mum, I'm going to be travelling back out to Rio in a couple of weeks.
Oh yes, we've been following things in the paper.
Looks like we might be moving out there for good.
Oh, do be careful, Charmian.
It's not a nice country by all accounts.
Your father says it's ruled by thugs.
I'm going out there for a short trip, to look at possible places to live and things and I was thinking, on the way home, of breaking the journey in England so we could come and see you - the boys and I.
Oh Oh, that would be nice.
Yes, I I'd love that.
And would Dad be OK about it? I'll talk to him, Charmian.
I've got time to get him used to the idea.
So what do you think? It's brilliant.
What about you, Twiz? Do you think you could live here? If Dad were with us, I could.
Senhor Biggs, are you looking forward to seeing your English wife and your family again? Can we talk to you later? Look who it is, boys.
Aren't you gonna say hello to your old dad? Go on, boys.
Come on.
See Dad.
Oh I can't believe what a big boy you are now.
I'm nearly seven.
I hear you're a good footballer.
I'm quite good.
Come and sit down.
Do you want a coffee? No.
No, no, I'm fine.
So what are we gonna do today? We could go to the beach.
Can we take a cable-car ride to the top of Sugarloaf Mountain? I heard about it on the airplane.
Can we go on the cable-car, Dad? We can walk to it from here, can't we? What sort of tools do you use at work, Dad? Look, the thing is um Well, I haven't really got any time this morning.
I've only got an hour or so, then I've got to get back.
Why? I've got to keep things sweet with her ladyship.
Sorry, love.
We've travelled thousands of miles to be with you.
And I'm supposed to be living with her, under the terms of my release.
It wouldn't look good if I'm seen with you.
What are we supposed to do? We came here to spend time with you.
Look, she's almost lost the baby once already, and she's in such a stew with you lot being here, it could happen again.
She snaps her fingers and you jump? If she wasn't pregnant, I wouldn't be free now, would I? Jesus Christ.
Can we at least go down to the pool, so the boys can have a swim? It would have to be this place they put you up in, eh? Where I was arrested.
No, look, it's probably safer to stay up here just now.
There's a few journos down there looking for a scoop.
So why don't we Yeah, we'll get some room service sent up and I can come back tomorrow morning.
I know a lovely spot where we can take the boys fishing.
How about that? Right, that's it.
I'm going over there.
It's outrageous leaving us waiting like this.
Come on, you two.
Please, Twiz.
I don't want to see him.
I don't even like him.
OK.
Suit yourself.
You can stay here and I'll tell reception.
But you don't leave this room.
You understand? Come on.
Ah, bellissima! I wish to see my husband! My husband! What the hell are you playing at? What's up? You were supposed to be at the hotel at eight.
The boys have been waiting for you.
Oh, sorry, it was a bit of a night last night.
Have you any idea how selfish you are? Calm down.
I won't bloody calm down! This little boy - your son - was excited to come on this trip because he could finally have a dad instead of having to borrow other daddies from his friends.
Twiz is so upset he wouldn't leave the hotel.
We came ready to start a new life with you What? I'll ask her.
Ask me what? She said can you come back another time cos she's feeling tired? Tell your whore, no, I will not leave.
And will she get out of my husband's bed and put some fucking clothes on?! I don't know what you're saying but you can go to hell! You're nothing but a cheap, common tart! How dare she talk to me like that?! The divorce hasn't gone through! I am still your wife! If she wants a fight, I'll give her one! She thinks she's had it tough! I was crying myself to sleep at night for four bloody years! I buried my son.
I can't believe you'd treat us like this.
Come on.
Oh, dear God.
This is an impossible situation.
I may not have her body but I've given you three kids.
I'm her equal facially and I know I'm better company.
It isn't a competition.
She's just helping us out.
It seems to me she's got designs on becoming the new Mrs Biggs.
Anyway, it's not the perfect, but the imperfect, who have need of love.
Don't you dare quote Oscar Wilde to me.
If you must know, I can barely stand the sight of her.
Ron, remember in Paris I tried to tell you something.
It's important.
I got pregnant.
I had an abortion.
Yeah, I guessed it was something like that.
It was a stupid mistake and I've had a long time to regret it.
But you were right when you said it didn't matter.
Tell me this is the same, that this baby won't make a difference.
It's a means to an end.
That's all.
When are we gonna spend some time together? We've got so much making up to do.
There's a party tomorrow night.
We can spend some time together there.
Hey, I'm Conti, a friend of Ron's.
He told me all about you.
That's Virgil, our host.
He and Ron met in a bar.
They make unlikely companions, don't they? Not really.
As long as Virgil's buying the drinks.
We're all hoping Ron can stay free.
Listen, mate, I know you've got to keep Ju Ju sweet, but your wife is sitting over there getting seriously pissed off.
Oh, she's all right.
Charm knows the score.
Relax.
Boys Boys, now, listen.
Come here, little one.
Look at that.
Say hello to your little brother or sister.
Eh? What do you think it's gonna be? A boy.
A boy? Not a girl? OK, that's it! I've had enough.
We're leaving.
What's the matter with you? Get off me! No, Charm, wait.
Wait.
You're sick, making him touch her like that! Come on, it was just a bit of fun.
Where you going? Home.
Back to the hotel? We are leaving on a flight tomorrow morning! Come on.
Let's talk about this.
I've been trying to talk since we got here.
Look, Charm, just give it another couple of months, yeah? Then we can all move in together.
Raimunda and the baby and you and the boys.
What do you think? I don't know what's wrong with you.
Boys, come with me a minute.
Conti, look after the boys for me.
Shh.
Shh.
Let's go back to the hotel now and make love, eh? You want that, don't you, eh? It's been so long, hasn't it, eh? Come on.
Let's do it right now.
Get off me! I don't know how to handle it.
If I don't play things right with her, I'm gonna be deported.
You know what? I don't blame you.
I don't even blame her.
I just I can't stand it any more.
Maybe I was naive.
Maybe I rushed out here too soon.
I just I wanted us to be together again.
I thought I could hack it - go back and do my time.
But I can't, love.
I need to be free.
Oh, Ron.
You're confusing being free with not being in prison.
You really think this is what it's like to be free? Boys.
No No, look, I love you, Charm.
I never stopped loving you, Ron.
Only what you've become.
Come on, boys.
Out you get.
Hello, Mum.
Hello, Charmian.
Hello, boys.
I recognise you from your photos.
Do you know who I am? You're our grandma.
That's right.
Charm.
Gillian.
Look at you.
You're so grown up.
Look at your hair.
Forgive them.
They haven't seen each other for a long time.
Well, come on in.
Come on, boys.
And then this is my fiance Keith.
Oh, very nice.
When are you getting married? When he qualifies.
We're saving like mad.
Those boys are a credit to you, Charmian.
They haven't turned out badly, have they? In spite of the best efforts of their father and I.
How is Ron? Keeping his spirits up? That's one way of putting it.
The trip to Rio wasn't an unqualified success.
Oh.
What happened? Ron behaved very badly.
We were made to feel like an embarrassment to him.
Told you he was no good.
I knew he'd let you down in the end.
You were right, Dad.
It's over between Ron and I.
We're getting a divorce.
Sometimes I feel it would have been better if we'd never met.
So, are those two young gentlemen out there my grandsons? They look fine, healthy boys, Charmian.
I was a good cricketer myself, when I was their age.
Did you know? My word, you boys are hungry fellows.
I've never seen anyone put away as many potatoes as you.
Sunday lunch is their favourite.
Once you're back home, you can come again.
Perhaps we can arrange a cricket match, too.
Are you coming back? It would be lovely to see you more often.
There's nothing to keep her away, not now she's getting a divorce.
No, it's true.
You don't have to wait for him any more, love.
You're free.
Please come home, Charm.
I'm sorry, but Australia is our home now.
I want to go back and finish my degree and raise the boys there in a country that wants us.
Where we can feel some hope for the future.
The future's full of possibilities.
The past will only drag us down.
After all, what am I here? I'm just Mrs Biggs the train robber's wife.