New Amsterdam (2018) s02e03 Episode Script

Replacement

1 I've been down an assistant, and I need someone who can keep the trains running at one of the most complex health institutions in the country.
I have specialized in logistics at not-for-profits with client bases north of 100,000.
Well, I oversaw operational budgets at best-in-class public hospitals in Boston and Philadelphia.
Boston and Philadelphia.
Uh, you'll need to be proficient in a bunch of boring yet very complicated admin software that, uh, frankly, I don't know how to use.
I have four years experience consulting on next-gen EHR coding.
Well, I've secured multiple grants to install electronic records systems at rural hospitals.
Wow, is that a pie chart? Mm-hmm.
It's very detailed.
I don't own a computer.
You don't, um Any medical sector experience, or? [CLEARS THROAT.]
No, sir.
No.
It's, uh - Todd Benson.
- Todd Benson, yeah.
Uh, quick question, buddy, I don't mean to be rude, but are you sure you're at the right interview? Yes sir, um, I've had a little trouble transitioning from my last job.
Which was what, exactly? Well, on a given day, I would organize information flow between the British, the French, the Afghans, and 90 Chinook helicopters.
You're a veteran.
Yes, sir.
Army, four tours.
- Is that on your, uh, résumé? - No, sir.
I found that it freaks some people out.
Oh, right.
[TINY CHUCKLE.]
Well, uh, Todd, I'm sorry to say this, but I don't know if you're the right fit.
As much as I'm deeply indebted for your service.
I need this job, Dr.
Goodwin.
My VA insurance can't cover a gopher hole, and more than that, I I need a place to feel useful again.
Well, um, how about this? Why don't I have HR keep you in mind for something that, uh, better suits your skill set? I spent six years in the Middle East, coordinating four languages, $3 billion worth of military gear, and the lives of my friends.
I may not know computers, but if there is one thing my skill set definitely includes, it's knowing how to make the trains run on time.
All I'm asking is you give me a shot.
[PENSIVE AMBIENT MUSIC.]
[JAZZ DRUMMING.]
Welcome to I am so sorry, but in order for the drug tests to be valid, I have to, um, to watch.
Well, I have peed in front of you a million times.
You just weren't the deputy medical director then.
And, my job didn't depend on the results, and you know what? I kinda wish I hadn't worn such sexy underwear.
[LAUGHS.]
How about we change the subject? I'm thinking about adopting I have been having sex with my physical therapist.
What? No.
Zach Ligon? I know, I know, I know, he's the worst.
He is smug and shallow, and I needed a distraction, okay? - He's your doctor! - He's my colleague.
Who then tragically became my doctor, but you know what? I'm totally over it and it's never gonna happen again.
I mean, I shouldn't judge.
After all, this is the most intimate I've been anybody since Akash and I broke up.
Then I am glad that I wore my sexy underwear.
[LAUGHS.]
Oh [WHISPERS.]
I don't know.
Before the crash, I thought I'd figured it all out.
Not just with him, but as a doctor.
You know what? Don't do that.
Look, it didn't work out with a guy you were dating.
Join the club.
You're killing it as a doctor.
Look how much money you raised for precision oncology.
"Dr.
Helen" raised that money, not Dr.
Sharpe.
Oh, God.
Don't be so quick to discount your celebrity.
'Cause life it's a little bit like a drug test.
It counts more when people watch.
[JAZZY MUSIC.]
You have the face of a man who just paid off his student loans.
Hey, Evie's coming back from San Fran tomorrow.
Been six weeks already? That went fast.
[SCOFFS.]
For you.
I'm planning a wedding by myself.
[SCOFFS.]
I can't relate to people in love.
Renée, Renée, Renée Don't say it, Dr.
Reynolds.
Well, what's it been? Two weeks since our coronary artery bypass? Looks like you reopened the vein at the extraction site.
I fell.
Well, that's quite a fall, Renée.
The fall wasn't so bad.
It's just that I couldn't get up.
How long were you on the ground? 14 hours.
Renée.
I know, I know.
Ever since Patrick passed, it's just been me.
- Well, who found you? - The delivery man.
He knocked on my door by mistake.
He was looking for my neighbor.
It was so humiliating.
No, come on.
No, hey I'm here.
I'm gonna get you fixed up, all right? - [DOORS THUD OPEN.]
- Vince Martinelli, 47.
BP 80 over 40, he's tachy with a heart rate of 130.
Diaphoretic and showing signs of dehydration.
Found him collapsed at a construction site over on 19th.
Thanks, we'll take him from here.
Mr.
Martinelli? My name is Dr.
Bloom.
- Am I dying? - Not if I can help it.
Let's hang a liter of PlasmaLyte.
We're gonna run another EKG to figure out what's going on with your heart, okay? Has this ever happened to you before? No, never.
Been feeling like I was coming down with the flu all week, and then this happened.
Well, good news is you're not having a heart attack.
When can I be back on the job? One step at a time, okay? No hours, no pay, Doc.
I get it, but there is something going on.
You notice anything else recently? Yeah, well [SUSPENSEFUL AMBIENT MUSIC.]
My pee I've seen some blood in there, too.
That's bad, right? [MILITARY DRUMMING.]
Todd, I know that your military service has instilled in you a deep respect for rank, but if you're gonna replace my old assistant, then I need you to be way less respectful.
- Yes, sir.
- No, sir! See, there's no sir-ing at New Amsterdam.
Just loosen up, speak your mind, you know? Yo, Max, wait up.
Yeah, see, Dr.
Reynolds is a perfect example of our informal, laid-back vibe.
Uh, permission to speak freely? - Granted.
- Todd I got a post-op patient who has just readmitted after falling.
Now I gotta stitch up her graft on her leg, again.
Medicare should cover the surgery.
Well, they should.
What they don't cover is the in-house checkups my patient really needs to make sure she doesn't come back again.
You're talking about a live-in nurse? No, no, Max, just check-ups.
Look this isn't the first time this has happened here.
Unless we do something, it won't be the last.
All right, I'm on it.
I will take it to the board this morning.
- Yes, sir.
- Nope, don't start that.
Yes, sir.
That's not a thing! [CLOCK TICKING.]
- [BEEP.]
- Is it possible we got the wrong day? Or time or, uh, place? Is this the right room? Well, you're five minutes early.
- How did that happen? - Punctuality shows discipline.
- [JAZZY MILITARY DRUMMING.]
- If you can't rely on someone to be on time, how can you rely on them for anything else? Guess we've just been kind of winging it, Todd.
Vince Martinelli's labs, hot off the press.
Normal, normal, normal, within range wait, wait his cobalt serum value is 60 micrograms per liter? Cobalt poisoning.
How'd he get that? Okay, uh, page Sharpe and get the Department of Public Health on the line.
We may need to shut down his construction site.
Resolve to renew our partnership with Le Bernardin for next year's gala.
Second? The motion proceeds.
All in favor? Then très bien for Le Bernardin.
[PAGES RUSTLING.]
Next item, the gala's theme.
I'm thinking masquerade.
Point of order, uh Sorry, am I saying that right? Is it point of order? It's a thing you can say.
Good, point of order.
This is a waste of time.
Uh, masquerade, no masquerade doesn't really matter.
I'd like to talk about Renée Hamrick.
Max, we have an agenda Renée Hamrick had heart surgery here three weeks ago, and she made it.
But because of nonexistent post-op care, she ended up back in our hospital today, to do it all over again.
So I would like to propose the New Amsterdam Visiting Nurses Agency.
We sent select nurses to our patients' homes to provide after-care check-ins and at this year's gala we can all raise a glass, knowing that what happened to Renée Hamrick will never happen again.
All in favor? Someone has to second.
Can I get a second? Can I get a second? No second.
Dr.
Goodwin's characteristically uplifting yet exorbitantly priced proposal is rejected.
Next topic: Selecting our newest board member.
That's it? This is our The binders in front of you have a bio of Lamont Hallstrom.
Lamont is a top dog at AQP's hedge fund and he's eager to serve.
Now, we vote tomorrow morning, 10:30 sharp.
But since he's running unopposed Yeah, actually, he's not running unopposed, and correct me if I'm wrong, but our by-laws state that any member can nominate candidates, so as a member I happen to have the perfect candidate in mind.
So, who's your perfect candidate? No idea, Todd, but I've got 24 hours to figure that out.
Oh, so you lied to your superior? [JAZZY DRUMMING.]
The board is what you get when power is in the hands of rich people whose only friends are other rich people who've never even met a regular guy like you or me.
But you're rich.
Me? No, not by a long shot.
Are you debt-free and making six figures a year? - Uh, well - Then you're rich.
Yeah, but not, like, rich-rich.
Are most of your friends other doctors? I mean, kind of, but So then your friends are rich.
[STAMMERS.]
What are you getting at, Todd? Well, actually, you're a lot like the board.
I'm like those guys? No, no, no.
They they're board people, okay? They all went to Harvard.
Where'd you go? Brown, but that's liberal Ivy.
It's totally different.
- Okay.
- You know what, Todd? You're dismissed.
Rohan Beta! Is there a game tonight? Did I forget to put it in my calendar? No, no, we didn't have plans.
I have some news.
News? Come, sit, sit.
What is your news? Um my band we, uh, kind of have this cool thing going.
What cool thing? It's a tour, a big tour.
Huge, actually.
We're gonna be on the road for months.
Now, I know you don't approve No, no, no, no.
You're following your dreams.
I'm very proud of you, Beta.
I would like to help.
Can I send you some money while you're on the road? Isn't that what you call it? On the road? Yeah.
But no, I need to do this on my own.
There's one thing you could do for me.
Anything you need.
Look out for Ella for me.
I don't want her to feel too alone.
Oh, of course I will.
[SOFT MUSIC.]
[OVERLAPPING CHATTER.]
You guys are so annoying seriously! No, guys, we have to start over he didn't say anything.
- It doesn't matter! - Yes it does.
That's the point of the game.
Say something! - Okay.
- It's always the same thing with her it's like she's the only one with problems.
Okay, okay, Shoshanna.
It's fine to have emotions in here.
Obviously, that's the whole point, but let's try to remember intent versus impact, okay? Emily, what's going on? What's happening with you? I just feel alone.
Why do you think you feel alone? Come on, back in the circle here.
Nobody cares what I think.
I don't matter to anyone.
#truth.
[GROANS.]
Shoshanna, please.
You know, it's okay to feel alone.
We all feel alone from time to time, right? Even when we aren't, right? Daniel, what about you? How do you feel? Yeah, I guess I feel alone sometimes.
And I and I just [GAGS.]
Ooh, hold on.
Emily? You okay? Something something smells weird in here.
[SNIFFS.]
Like rotten eggs.
Okay, well, I'm I don't smell anything, so I smell it, too.
Like, really gross rotten eggs.
Um, you're all smelling it? Okay, uh, let's be safe.
Everyone, come on, let's get up.
Up and out of the class.
We will go to a less stinky locale.
Come on, Emily, you'll be okay.
Come on.
[JAZZY DRUMMING.]
All right, everybody down.
Yep, you know where to go.
Something wrong? Um, maybe, yeah.
Can you get maintenance? We may have a gas leak.
[DOOR OPENS.]
Great news for Renée Hamrick.
Oh, the board approved visiting nurses? Not yet, not by a long shot.
But, once they approve my new candidate, I am confident they will.
That's fantastic.
Who'd you, uh, sucker into signing up for that? No, no.
Yeah.
[CLEARS THROAT.]
Just hear me out, because I need an ally on the board, one of us, someone who can make sure that when programs like the Visiting Nurse's Agency come up, Brantley can't just [WHISTLES.]
brush 'em aside.
- What time are the meetings? - 10:30 on Wednesday.
Look, Max, I'd love to help, but the reason that the board meets at 10:30 every Wednesday is because they don't have other jobs.
I have surgery.
It would suck to miss surgery, but, it could mean that the next Renée Hamrick wouldn't need additional surgery at all.
So, think about it.
Come on buddy, what do you say? Me and you, shaking things up.
All right, I'm in.
Yes, yes! Thank you.
[JAZZY DRUMMING.]
- Dr.
Reynolds? - Mm-hmm.
- No.
- No? - $4.
75.
- Keep it.
- Oh, thank you.
- No, don't thank her.
She's undermining elections.
No one's undermining anything, Max.
Mm-hmm.
I'm giving you reality, a thankless task which appears to be my lot.
Dr.
Reynolds is accomplished.
He is dynamic, he knows this hospital inside and out.
Can Dr.
Reynolds raise seven figures? No.
Can he donate it himself? No.
Ergo, he's out.
Money is how programs like the Visiting Nurse's Program gets funded.
If you want to play this game, bring me a candidate the board can actually use.
Like another rich sycophant? Like a CEO, a hedge fund manager, or a celebrity.
Better yet, all three.
Happy hunting! [JAZZY DRUMMING.]
- Oh, oh.
- [COUGHS AND GAGS.]
Okay, um Is Emily gonna be okay? I'm handling it, Daniel.
You didn't exactly answer the question.
Okay, you know what? That's enough.
Head to the classroom, everybody.
Thank you, I'll be there in a second.
Thank you.
Here, yeah, come on.
Take a seat.
Not feeling any better, huh? My head still hurts and I'm seeing spots.
Yeah, you know, natural gas, it can deprive our body of oxygen and it causes all these nasty little symptoms.
It's called hypoxia.
No gas leak.
I'm sorry, what? No gas leak? Um, hang on.
Just keep breathing, okay kiddo? What are you talking about? Emily is literally retching her guts up on the floor.
Building services checked the entire floor twice.
[VOMITS.]
[SIGHS.]
[GROANS.]
All right, page Kapoor.
Thank you.
I don't want any trouble.
I understand that, Mr.
Martinelli, but we need you to tell us what you've seen at your construction site.
Any old signs of labels talking about cobalt, or other heavy metals? No, nothing like that.
What about old insulation? They're running a clean shop, I swear, and they're square by me, especially how they treated me since my accident.
What accident? I was welding early on on the joists, fell 10 feet and shattered my hip.
Gosh, you're lucky that was all.
And I was out a while.
But the foreman, after my hip replacement, put me on site hauling.
[OMINOUS MUSIC.]
He didn't have to do that.
Um, what do they have you doing as a site hauler? Driving the trash away.
It's the cushiest job I've ever had for the money.
Mr.
Martinelli, are you okay if we check something? - With that? - All you're gonna feel is a slight pinch and some pressure.
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
[GROANS.]
[INHALES SHARPLY AND GROANS.]
Bloom, that's not blood.
What the hell? Mr.
Martinelli, you're being poisoned by your artificial hip.
Emily's symptoms could be caused by any number of things.
I need to order some further tests.
Oh, come on, don't give me that.
Your beautiful mind already has a diagnosis.
No.
[INHALES.]
I have a hypothesis.
I suspect Emily is suffering from a complex migraine.
- A complex migraine? - Iggy! Come quick, something's wrong.
What? [COUGHING AND GAGGING.]
Oh, whoa.
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
You might need to revise that hypothesis.
So, Renée Hamrick is here for an I&D in the primary closure of her left leg's saphenous vein graft site, and the position looks good to me.
We're ready to proceed.
Okay.
Alicia, go ahead and start the general anesthetic.
And for you, I've got some good news.
Usually you wait till after the surgery to say that.
I was just appointed to the hospital board.
And for my first act in office, I intend to make sure you have someone to check on you post-op free of charge.
You can do that? Oh, absolutely.
See you when you wake up.
Dr.
Reynolds! I'm in the middle of something.
Okay, I have some bad news, so I'm just gonna say it really fast: you're not on the board.
What? Well, who'd you get? No one.
They just, you know, didn't want you.
[GROANS.]
Max, I just promised this woman that we would look after her this time around.
And we're gonna keep that promise.
How, exactly? I think I know.
Do you know how hard the FDA makes it - to answer one simple question? - What's the question? If we put this hip into someone's body, will it kill them? Is that a real question? The FDA stopped approving metal-on-metal hips in 2016 due to higher risks, but how does that help the 3,000 patients that we gave these hips to before 2016? I am so glad you asked that, because that is exactly the kind of issue that you are gonna be solving when you are on the board of New Amsterdam.
On the board? - You're my first choice.
- [SCOFFS.]
You don't want Dr.
Sharpe, you want Dr.
Helen.
Yes, that is true, Brantley needs a celebrity.
Max, when you first got here, you asked me to scale down on publicity and scale up on medicine, which gave me purpose, a renewed sense of self, something I could really use right about now.
I know, but I really need one of us on the board to make a difference, someone who represents our views, and Brantley already nixed Reynolds.
Oh, gosh, I thought I was your first choice.
First in my heart.
Oh Max, I would love to help you and this hospital, but Brantley will never approve me, celebrity or not, because effective chairmen only approve board members that they agree with, and that's most definitely not one of us.
[JAZZY DRUMMING.]
Okay.
- Dr.
Goodwin.
- Whoa.
It's not a covert operation, Todd.
You need anything? Nope, I'm all good, and by all good I mean all bad, but in your free time, feel free to run some errands or stop by the VA.
Unless I have six weeks of free time, I won't be able to deal with the wait at the VA.
Oh, well, let me make a call.
I'll get you in.
Nope, thank you I don't want any special treatment.
It's what you get with socialized medicine.
Oh, and you're not a fan of socialized medicine.
- It's un-American.
- It's un-American? What could be more American than helping people? A system that embraces competition rather than relying on a captive patient population.
We are standing in a public hospital, and as the guy who runs this place chock full of socialized medicine, let me assure you, Todd, we're doing a good thing here.
But in a socialized market, there's no incentive for hospitals to provide better care.
This hospital has 1,000 beds, sees over 100,000 emergency room visits every year.
- We don't - Max! Max! Hey, hi! We, uh hi.
So, we feel obliged to tell you that we may have an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in the hospital.
But, uh, it's cool.
We have it totally under control.
Uh, we don't.
Not yet, but very soon.
Yeah, it's, like, old water systems, faulty AC units, you know.
[CHUCKLES.]
It was only a matter of time.
Good, got it? Okay.
You were saying? About this hospital? Okay, this plasmapheresis machine will filter your blood and it'll help save your remaining kidney function.
How is this even happening? The ball joint and the socket of your artificial hip are made of a cobalt alloy.
The metal parts are rubbing against each other and the friction is causing the cobalt to flake off into your bloodstream.
How do you stop it? We are, uh, going to need to replace your hip, Vince.
Ah, no.
And how do we know this won't just happen again? Wedlow Medical, the manufacturer, claims to have fixed the problem with their newer models.
Claims to have fixed it? This is my body! Who's gonna pay for the surgery? Or the time I'm out of work? It took eight weeks last time.
You think my worker's comp is gonna cover this again? - No way.
- Vince No, this'll bankrupt me.
Listen to me, Mr.
Martinelli.
That is not gonna happen, I promise you I'll make sure of it.
And then who the hell is gonna pay? They are.
The antibiotics aren't working.
Symptoms are just getting worse.
- For which patient? - For all of them.
Fevers are all over 100, Daniel's vomiting has increased and Shoshanna's shortness of breath Um, where is Shoshanna? [SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
Shoshanna, what are you doing here? "Low stimulus room.
" - Okay.
- I couldn't take any more of the crying and the puking and "Will Emily be okay?" How are you feeling? - Fine.
- Fine? May I? Breathe, please.
[INHALES.]
- Once more.
- [INHALES.]
No bronchial constriction.
Any nausea? No.
[SOFT DRAMATIC MUSIC.]
Normal.
Hey, Shoshanna.
How long have you been in here? Not long, I just needed someplace quiet to journal.
How come she is the only one better? You keep journaling, okay? [SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
Iggy, this is hardly any time for stress eating.
What? No, I'm not stress eating, Vijay.
I think I know how I can fix this.
How? With these.
You really think this is gonna work? Well, you know what they say about a spoonful of sugar.
- Okay.
- Yeah.
You have something called MPI, but this will make you feel better.
- When? - Almost instantaneously.
I do declare you're gonna miss your candyman, yeah - Is this candy? - Nope, it's medicine.
Fast-acting.
- Just one pill? - Just one pill.
- Can I chew it? - No.
I do declare you're gonna miss your candyman, yeah I'm keeping you safe and warm - Swallow.
- Yeah, baby Keeping you out of harm Are you sure this isn't candy? Yes.
Yeah, baby, keepin' you out of harm Where you gonna go when it start to storm Should I take one, too? I could've been exposed.
No, no, no, you're too old to contract it.
Too old? Yes, MPI stands for "Mass Psychogenic Illness," also known as Collective Obsessional Behavior, also known as Mass hysteria? Bingo.
Yes, MPI tends to crop up in isolated, pressurized groups of young people, much like fancy boarding schools our psych ward.
Or Salem.
Yeah, and once it gets rolling, it transmits by line-of-sight, much like an actual physical virus.
That's why Shoshanna improved once she was isolated.
So wait, after all this, no one was actually sick? Well, I wouldn't say that.
And the symptoms are about as real as they get, clearly.
But, um, a psychological problem requires a psychological cure.
[JAZZY MUSIC.]
Preferably cherry-flavored.
Hi, uh oh, sorry.
You okay? I'm working on it.
Good, 'cause I'm in a bit of a pickle.
Um, so, I need help filling an extra seat on the board.
Oh, I'm in.
Oh, thank you.
You know what? The busier I am, the less pain I feel.
Actually, I was kind of hoping to fill it with your mother.
My mother? Yeah, okay, hear me out.
You said that she runs in wealthy socialite crowds, right? Which is great, because Brantley will assume that she is one of them.
But here is where the plan gets really good she will secretly be working for us, right? Our man on the inside.
You can tell her how to vote and what to back and what to bring to the floor Like a puppet? Yeah, more like a Trojan Horse, but for the good guys.
Max.
[SIGHS.]
She can't be trusted.
Well, that's okay, I mean, even if she doesn't go with us every time, it No.
No, I mean she can't be trusted to show up, anywhere.
Except for maybe a hosted bar.
And even if we programmed her, she would still vote for whoever was doing the shaking and the pouring.
Got it.
I didn't know that, sorry.
No, no, don't be.
No, it helps to be reminded I am genetically predisposed to it.
Guess you're gonna have to go with plan B.
Yeah, plan B failed several plans ago.
[EXHALES.]
[SOFT MUSIC.]
Paging Dr.
Goodwin.
Page me as soon as she wakes up.
Will do.
[PHONE BUZZES.]
- Evie.
- Hey babe, how's it going? Well, I, uh, just had to redo a surgery because our health care system only goes halfway when it matters.
- That sounds frustrating.
- Oh, well, it is.
But I'll be all right, you know why? Because you are coming home to me tomorrow.
Evie? Okay, so don't freak out, this is good news.
HHC is so impressed by my work, they've asked me to stay here for two more weeks.
Two more weeks? I know, but I have to see this job through.
What's the point of only going halfway when it matters, right? [SIGHS.]
I gotta go.
- Floyd, wait, I - [BEEP.]
- Vijay? - Ella? Have you seen Rohan? He was supposed to meet me here two hours ago.
Yes, I saw him.
He came to say good-bye before he left on the tour.
What tour? Um, his tour on the with the band? Oh, my God.
For the last two hours I've been trying to convince myself this wasn't happening.
I should've known he couldn't handle it.
But to disappear like a coward? I don't understand.
There's no tour, Vijay.
He lied.
He bailed.
W-why would he do that? I'm pregnant.
[SOFT DRAMATIC MUSIC.]
[RAPID BEEPING.]
Dr.
Kapoor, Dr.
Kapoor! Get me Ativan, now! 1 mil Ativan.
I thought everyone was getting better.
They were.
Everyone else is, just Emily 60 lpm, high flow 02.
- Pulse ox 95.
- What's wrong with her? I don't know! She's stabilizing.
[STUTTERS.]
I-I'm sorry.
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
Because you personally brought this to our attention, Wedlow Medical is willing to cover the cost of Mr.
Martinelli's new hip replacement.
And? We'll also cover Mr.
Martinelli's rehabilitation and lost wages.
Yeah, no, that's not gonna work for us.
Because I discovered that when the FDA banned metal-on-metal hips, your company simply coated those defective hips.
Mr.
Martinelli would like your 100% ceramic hip.
The one that won't poison me.
Those are triple the cost.
Oh, I wasn't done.
We'd also like Wedlow Medical to provide the ceramic hip free of charge to any new patient who suffers a malfunction of your coated devices.
Dr.
Sharpe, we don't have to offer your patients anything.
We're in full compliance with the FDA, in fact, we only took this little meeting because, frankly, we're big fans of Dr.
Helen.
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
[SCOFFS.]
[CHUCKLES.]
Brilliant.
Then Dr.
Helen will go on TV and broadcast to the world how Wedlow Medical's poorly designed products harm patients.
And perhaps I'll bring this to drive my point home.
It's joint fluid.
We found it inside Mr.
Martinelli's body.
You do that, and we'll crush you with so many defamation suits, you'll never practice medicine again.
I'd like to see you try.
They'll destroy you.
They have bottomless pockets and a fleet of lawyers and they will destroy everything that you have ever worked for.
They only see me as Dr.
Helen, a TV personality, so I intend to put that personality to good use.
Yeah, and what about Dr.
Sharpe? She is out fighting for her patients, something that you do every single day, and yet, you're asking me to pull my punches.
Why would you do that? Because this will end your career, and I can't do this without you.
I'm not fully here.
Part of me is still on that ambulance.
You push me away, and you expect me to understand.
And then you need me? And you use your feelings as leverage.
You think I'm using Georgia to manipulate you? I don't what you're doing because you won't ever talk to me.
- I can't talk to you.
- Why? Because I'm trying to spare you.
I don't want you to feel this.
I don't want you to experience this [CHUCKLES.]
And it's not fair.
I know.
None of this is fair.
We can just toss "fair" out the window.
Max, when you need me, I am here for you.
For all of it.
But not at the expense of my patient.
As awful as it sounds, in regards to some of the larger medical device companies, we've just become guinea pigs for their inferior products.
It's not as if it's a microwave that you can return or get recalled.
Exactly.
We're talking about products that are surgically implanted into your body.
In your spine, your heart, the hip.
And if these products fail, you get sick.
Or worse, you die.
I have a brave, hardworking patient whose life has been turned upside down by one of these products.
The time has come to make a stand.
When we come back, Dr.
Helen will reveal which company to avoid and why.
[PHONE BUZZES.]
And, we're out! [SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
[PHONE BUZZES.]
And we're back in 3, 2 Welcome back to "The Night Shift".
I'm here with Dr.
Helen, who has come to warn us about a company that harmed one of her patients.
Dr.
Helen? I'm actually not here to shame any one particular company, because in truth, they're all in compliance with the FDA, and that's where the real fault lies.
So you're taking on the FDA? It appears that way, doesn't it? The FDA need to enact real regulations on medical devices that protect patients, not corporate profit.
We need clinical trials before implanting heavy metals into our body.
We need oversight.
We deserve that much.
So what can our viewers at home what can they do? Call your representatives, demand to be heard.
If we want change, then we have to be the ones to initiate it.
[JAZZY PERCUSSION.]
Dr.
Bloom, we don't have a session today.
We do.
For the next seven minutes.
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC.]
Remember to sit still, Emily.
Dr.
Kapoor, the results are up.
You have what is called a meningioma.
A tumor on the lining of your brain.
It's been causing all your symptoms.
Yeah, that sounds a lot worse than it actually is.
Meningiomas are usually benign.
Once we remove them, you will be back to your old self.
Did everybody have one of these tumors, too? No, they didn't.
They saw you getting sick and then they believed that they were sick, too.
So I did this to them? No.
Emily, you didn't do anything.
They saw you and they were affected by you.
You know what that means? That they all hate me now? No, it means that you're not alone [SOFT PIANO MUSIC.]
That we're all connected.
Main hoon na.
What? In Bollywood movies, they would say, main hoon na.
Vijay, if you're here to make excuses for your son, you should leave before I lose it.
I went to Rohan's apartment, to his office, called up his sponsor I couldn't find him.
My son is gone.
Yeah, well When life overwhelms him, he he always runs away.
But not me.
I wish for you to know that.
Vijay? Main hoon na? What does that mean? "I'm there for you.
" [SOFTLY.]
It's time for the board meeting.
Ugh, we promised we'd help that woman and we failed.
I don't have the votes for the Visiting Nurse's Program.
Well a nanny state program like that probably wouldn't have worked, anyway.
I get that we all have different political beliefs, Todd, but that woman needs help, and she needs it now.
I understand that.
And self-reliance is the key to a good life, and it doesn't take taxpayer money to achieve.
Okay, okay, what about this? What if instead of wagging your finger or disagreeing with me, what about you help her? Give me a self-reliant solution that helps Renée Hamrick.
Get her a dog.
Get her a dog.
Adopt a dog for her.
Then you hire a dog walker to come by once a day.
To check on her.
Twice, pick up and drop off.
How much was this nurse's agency gonna cost you per day? Um, around $200.
I bet you can get a dog walker for $20.
Todd have you ever thought about being on a board? A CEO, a celebrity, or a hedge fund manager.
That's what you said, right? That's what this board needs, a leader.
Uh, someone acclaimed or someone rich.
Sergeant Todd Benson is a leader.
He asked for loyalty in a setting more intense than any boardroom, and he got it.
And [CHUCKLES.]
You don't get more acclaim than a veteran with a Purple Heart and a host of other decorations.
You left one out.
I respect your service, Sergeant, we all do, but the category Max conveniently skipped is the most important one: money.
Having it, donating it, raising it.
That's what a board member does.
Yeah, that's why you need Todd.
Todd did something today that most of you would call impossible.
He changed my mind.
And he did it using the kind of insight that you get when you spend your life making more out of less.
Economic diversity can lead to innovative solutions to dollars and cents problems.
Yes, money, that's what boards do.
That's why this board needs someone who knows what it's like to not have it.
How do we know he's not just going to vote however you say? Him? No, he's gonna vote with you more than he votes with me.
We can barely agree on, um literally anything.
Yeah, but we do agree on one thing, and that's that we both want to help.
He just helps in a way that's less "one of us" and more like the people that New Amsterdam is trying to serve.
[UPLIFTING MUSIC.]
Before we vote on Lamont Hallstrom, resolve to nominate Todd Benson to the board of New Amsterdam Hospital.
Is there a second? The motion proceeds.
All in favor? The votes have it.
Welcome to our newest board member, Sergeant Todd Benson.
Congratulations.
Oh, and the board is an unpaid position, so I think in this case we can make an exception.
Salary equal to what he's surrendering as my assistant seems fair.
Can I get a second? [CLEARS THROAT.]
There you go, yep.
Evie, hey look, before you say anything, I've gotta apologize.
I just, uh, I miss you.
I miss you, too.
[INHALES DEEPLY.]
And I'm so lucky to be marrying a man who is excited to plan our wedding while I'm here.
I just I feel so far away you know? Well, there's gotta be something we can do.
[KNOCK AT DOOR.]
[GROANS QUIETLY.]
One second.
But no matter what you do Even pray to heaven above Caterer needs a decision by tomorrow.
[LAUGHS.]