The Good Doctor (2017) s02e16 Episode Script

Believe

1 [ ALARM BEEPING ] [ BEEPING STOPS ] [ ALARM BEEPING ] [ BEEPING STOPS ] [ BRUSH THUDS ] Today is not Saturday.
Why did you make me pancakes? They are fresh start pancakes.
Like the first day of school every year when you get to wear a brand-new outfit.
[ CHUCKLES ] Well, not everyone wore a new outfit.
But the rule in this house is that when you start a new life event, you get pancakes.
I don't want a fresh start.
I want to stay in surgery.
I know.
And I am really proud of you for handling it all so [ KNOCK ON DOOR ] Doctors please give me one more minute.
We have an associate pastor at the church, but Clarence likes to write the sermons.
- Sorry.
- Please.
Although this is important too.
The surgery consists of two steps first we fuse the spine to stabilize it, and then we remove the tumor.
Because the cancer has spread to your lymph nodes, you'll still have to follow up with chemo.
- [ GROANS ] - Clarence, are you in pain? Quite a bit actually, but I'm fine.
Well, since what's causing your pain is the tumor pushing against your spine, the spinal fusion will ease pressure on your nerves and should eliminate your pain.
Please, I, uh I need this pain.
Can't you just do the second part and remove the tumor? If we don't fuse the spine, it'll make removing the tumor a lot more difficult.
More difficult, but it can be done? It can.
But I recommend against it.
Especially since there's no reason not to.
[ SIGHS ] I did something unforgivable.
This pain is my punishment.
Can I ask what you did that was so bad? I killed someone.
[ BELL DINGS ] - [ APPLAUSE ] - [ BELL DINGING ] JESS: My sister and I were coming home from climbing Mt.
Whitney.
We're doing the State 50 climbs.
The numbness started during the climb? First my hands, and then my feet.
[ GRUNTS ] - You have a headache? - Yeah.
LIM: High altitude causes headaches.
Dehydration compounds it.
From now on just climb slower.
And drink more.
Tell them about the other thing.
[ BEEP ] [ INDISTINCT TALKING OVER P.
A.
] Before leaving for the mountain, I had this weird sensation like dread.
I couldn't shake it.
Well, when people describe a sense of impending doom, it's usually anxiety.
No, it was like a premonition that I was going to die.
- I'm sure it was - Dr.
Park will run a brain scan, and we'll do some lab work.
Shaun.
Hello, Dr.
Lever.
Carly is fine.
Welcome to pathology.
It is going to be great working with you.
What do you think? I know it's a lot to take in.
It's kind of like your first time at Disneyland, right? I've never been to Disneyland.
Let me give you a tour.
Cytopathology, forensics, genomics, microbiology.
We get to identify organisms, interpret cell morphology, sequence genes.
Is that a D300e pathogen antibacterial bioprinter? It's new.
You're working on antibiotic resistance in emerging microorganisms? It's "we" now, Shaun.
Yes, we are.
[ SIGHS ] Do you want to play with it? - Very much.
- [ LAUGHS ] Go ahead.
It's kind of your job now.
We are the detectives.
Surgeons are just the beat cops.
[ WHIRRING ] Our best bet is to try to separate the tumor from his cord, and then resect it.
Okay, this is insane.
You know how he "killed" a person? He was counseling a parishioner who committed suicide.
That must have been traumatic.
Traumatic, yes.
Murder, no.
Hey, I know it's stupid, but he has autonomy.
I didn't stay stupid.
I said "insane.
" You want to override his wishes because he's religious? Something like 90% of Americans believe in God.
I'm one of them.
Are we all mentally impaired? Should you ignore us all if you don't like our choices? Only those getting divine messages from their tumors.
- He's not crazy.
- Okay, you're right.
He is just stupid.
But don't we have a duty to educate him? You're gonna talk him out of his religion? No.
You told him the surgery was more dangerous this way.
I don't think he appreciated how much more dangerous.
Good idea.
He thinks he'll go to hell if he dies before he's forgiven.
Make sure he knows it can happen on the table.
[ WHIRRING ] [ WARBLING ] PARK: An MRI for anxiety? It does fly in the face of reducing unnecessary medical tests.
When I was a resident, I had a patient come through the E.
R.
Female.
35 years old.
Slight cough.
Slightly hypothyroid.
Normal vitals.
I labeled her a whiner because she kept insisting, "I'm gonna die.
" I sent her home.
And she died? No.
She kept coming back.
- [ CHUCKLES ] - Over and over again.
We do this test, we prove there's nothing wrong with her, we send her home reassured.
[ BEEP ] Damn.
The MRI showed a high grade meningioma.
An advanced tumor that grows in the tissue layers that cover the brain.
Its features are consistent with it being malignant.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] These tumors tend to be aggressive and impossible to fully resect.
Um, so what what can you do? Palliative care, symptom control with medications.
[ SNIFFLES ] [ BREATHES DEEPLY ] You're risking spinal damage, paralysis death.
If that's what God chooses, then that is his will.
If you have cancer because he wants you to have cancer, why are you here? Getting treatment? I'm here because I believe in science.
I am who I am because I believe in God.
So do you think all people who are sick are being punished? I mean, we have an eight-year-old down the hall with bone cancer, you want to go tell her God hates her? I'm sure that girl is not suffering as a punishment.
She's suffering so others may have a chance to show her mercy, to show her compassion, so she can inspire.
I don't know His plan, but I know it's not as simple as you would No.
No, it's not simple.
Except for your pain.
His name was Michael.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] His wife found his body.
You had no idea.
I knew he was depressed.
But you thought he was getting better.
[ SCOFFS ] I didn't take his call.
Because I was having a drink.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] It'd been a long day dealing with the renovations, and I was having a damn drink.
[ DOOR OPENS ] PARK: Hey, Shaun.
Hey, Carly.
I started Sadie Barnes on anti-seizure medication, need you to run a peak phenytoin level.
The couriers must be happy that the surgeons are doing their own specimen deliveries.
How you doing down here? Carly says pathologists are the detectives, surgeons are just the beat cops.
Shaun, are you happy here? When did you give the patient her loading dose? One hour ago.
Hmm.
Shaun, if you're happy, that's great.
But if you're not, you have to tell Han how you feel.
You need to show him you care and that you believe in yourself.
Do you need this done STAT? No.
She's asymptomatic.
- It's just for seizure prevention.
- Good.
Carly says that in pathology you can take a break whenever you want.
I want to take a break now.
I'm going for a walk.
He shouldn't be in pathology.
- He's a good surgical resident.
- You're right.
- Then you'll move him back? - No.
You're wrong about that part.
He should be in pathology.
- But he was a good surgical resident.
- Then why Because he'll never be a good surgeon.
How do you think he'll do in three years when no one's looking over his shoulder? When he's looking over someone else's shoulder? Supervising new residents, leading grand rounds, advocating for vulnerable patients.
Do you see him doing any of that without a safety net? We can help him get there.
Just because he wants to be a surgeon, just because you want him to be a surgeon, doesn't mean he gets to have that dream come true.
[ BEEP ] Has it occurred to you that maybe we know Shaun better than you do? Has it occurred to you that that might be your problem? That your view of him might be distorted because you like him? Has it occurred to you that maybe he's better off in pathology? That maybe he'll even like it? Do you care? I thought you might.
- [ WHIRRING ] - We need better ventral exposure.
Drill off more of the pedicle and vertebral body.
Ligate the exiting nerve root.
We'll take it with the tumor for a wider margin.
I can't see it.
The tumor's causing the spinal cord to be bowed up to us.
We need more exposure to get around and in front of it.
The vertebrae is too fragmented and displaced.
We can't get a complete resection without stabilization.
- [ RAPID BEEPING ] - He's tanking.
Probably spinal shock from tension on the cord.
We need to abort.
[ BEEPING CONTINUES ] All right, on three.
One, two, three.
You fixed me! - No, no.
- What happened to my pain?! - Stop! - We didn't fix you.
There was a complication.
We injected anesthetic.
It'll wear off.
We had to stop the surgery before we could remove the tumor.
You went into shock.
We lost your heart rate and blood pressure.
We warned it would be a trickier surgery without the fusion.
Nothing has changed.
The anesthetic will wear off, the pain will come back, but worse.
When can you try again? Try again? We failed.
[ SIGHS ] There is no reason to think we will succeed - next time unless we do the fusion - But you know what the issues are, - you learned - Why haven't you? Do think God wants you to die? Please.
Try again.
[ SIGHS ] Cyanide poisoning.
The cause of death on the Atlin case.
You know how I found it? I smelled it almonds.
Dr.
Park's patient.
I flagged her eosinophil count it doesn't match up with the diagnosis of advanced meningioma listed on the requisition.
Great.
Nice work.
I'm going to talk to Dr.
Lim about it.
Whoa there, Shaun.
Hold up.
You don't need to do that.
The attendings are on the lookout for the flags.
- They'll run with it.
- I want to run with it.
You've been on the receiving end you know how it works.
How it works is I see something abnormal and then I discuss it with the team, and we plan how we'll fix it.
We run with it.
Shaun, once a test is done, we move on to the next one.
I'd like to take a walk.
Are you going to walk to Dr.
Lim and discuss this case, Shaun? [ SIGHS ] That's not what we do here.
We investigate, report, and then we move on.
Are you gonna be able to do that move on? I don't know.
But I will try very hard.
Next time.
[ KNOCKING ] Dr.
Browne.
Is this about a patient? No.
Come in.
I've heard a lot about you I'm aware you stood up to a supervisor.
Is that what's happening now? Um, I put together a list of cases which Dr.
Murphy contributed to.
Uniquely.
You're a loyal friend.
I've specified the ideas he had ideas that no one else around here could have Do you think I hate him? No.
But I think you might be biased against him because of his condition.
So he doesn't have communication issues? - I'm wrong about that? - No.
But he If he had the flu, I would tell him to stay home until he got better.
He has autism I could tell him to stay home until he gets better.
Instead I found a place for him to help us, to save lives.
And you should know I have rather mixed feelings about loyalty.
[ INDISTINCT CONVERSATIONS ] All righty.
There you go.
Hello.
Aaron.
It's good to see you.
Yeah.
The feeling is mutual.
Can I have one of those? - The chocolate chip muffin? - Yes, please.
Special occasion? - Yes.
- Yeah? As of today, I am no longer injecting toxins into my body.
Except, of course, with chocolate chips.
Oh, you're done with chemo? Wow.
That's amazing.
Congratulations.
Thank you.
I was thinking of going out tonight and celebrating what may be very good news.
If you're free, my treat.
I I'm sorry, Aaron.
I have a-another commitment.
Oh.
Um, tomorrow then? This week is really crazy.
You know what? I am not doing chemo every night next week, so I am free every single night, so Aaron, I'm seeing someone.
I'm sorry.
[ CHUCKLES ] Nothing to be sorry about.
It was good to see you.
MELENDEZ: Keep an extra close eye on blood pressure and heart rate.
[ MONITOR BEEPING ] MORGAN: I have extra fluid, vasopressors, and inotropes ready.
Why no God? You follow in the tradition that you're handed.
My family wasn't religious.
We never went to church.
I was there every Sunday.
8:00 a.
m.
for Catholic mass.
My parents eventually got tired of all the rules and turned Lutheran.
They found that dull and went back to Catholic.
[ CHUCKLES ] That's my tradition.
What do you think it'll be like when you die? Probably like it was before I was born.
A whole lot of nothing.
We're there.
Where we were when everything went wrong last time.
We need to remove the tumor without putting any pressure on his cord at all, or he'll be back in spinal shock.
And we need more tumor release from the vertebral body.
Extend your osteotomies proximal and distal.
[ WHIRRING ] Good.
I think I got a free plane Retract it from the cord a little more.
- I got it.
- Now, when you remove it careful not to morselize it.
Can you hold that up? Dr.
Reznick, give me a measurement.
Max length is 4.
5.
Get a pre-op scan up.
[ BEEP ] That says the tumor's eight centimeters.
How does a tumor shrink from 8 centimeters to 4.
5 without radiation in two weeks? It doesn't.
Why the page, Shaun? And why are you in radiology? We rely on flags.
You have to count on the ordering physician seeing it while you move on to something else.
- Okay.
And? - I don't agree with Sadie Barnes' diagnosis, and I think her tumor should be biopsied.
- Shaun, I - Dr.
Han wanted me away from patients.
Patients are not allowed in the viewing room.
So I'm not doing anything wrong.
- [ BEEP ] - Two radiologists said it was a malignant meningioma in the insular region and encasing the MCA vessels.
That's exactly where it is.
And her clinical picture matches perfectly arm and leg numbness.
The tumor attachment to the dura is slightly anomalous.
And the insular region is slightly atypical, too.
[ MOUSE CLICKS ] [ BEEP ] What differential diagnoses are you proposing? I need to speak to the patient.
- [ SIGHS ] - Should I ask Dr.
Han for permission? Shaun, I [ SCOFFS ] will bring your concern about the scan to the head of radiology.
But approaching Dr.
Han? Don't do that.
Now, I already talked to him about your reassignment.
I don't know if it'll make any difference If I were Claire, would you let me approach Dr.
Han about something that concerned me? Yes.
I probably would.
Hmm.
Is that because Claire doesn't make mistakes when she's communicating? Yes.
Then do you think Dr.
Han made the right decision by sending me to pathology? No.
[ BEEP ] The lymph nodes have shrunk, too.
This is a PET scan from two weeks ago.
Enlarged and cancerous.
- Today - [ BEEP ] they've all regressed.
[ BEEP ] [ CHAIR CREAKS ] Spontaneous regression has been reported in melanomas, renal cell carcinomas, neuroblastomas, and some types of blood cancers.
In a sarcoma that's metastasized? No.
But if it happened in those others, why not? Because none of them make sense.
When I read about disappearing cancer, I always think some doctor missed something, forgot something, - screwed up something.
- [ SIGHS ] The theory is that the body somehow triggers an immune response against the cancer.
Something somehow lights a fuse.
The theory says the fuse is lit by an infection.
His lab work proves he hasn't had one.
At this point, the most credible explanation is Are you gonna use the "m" word? You seriously can't say it? Only when referencing the 1980 U.
S.
hockey team.
Keep testing.
Anything you can think of.
Molecular markers, T-cells, PD-L1.
We'll need permission from the patient.
Which raises another issue what are we gonna do next, medically? He was supposed to start chemo next week.
No, it'll wipe out his immune system, which may be what's actually killing his cancer.
If we don't know what's making him better, we don't know what to stop, what to start.
So we do nothing? Just trust God to fix him? We trust whatever is currently fixing him to keep fixing him.
If he took a Tylenol yesterday at 8:00, he takes a Tylenol today at 8:00.
Monitor him.
Closely.
Scans constantly.
[ KNOCK ON DOOR ] Hello, Dr.
Glassman.
Hi.
Thank you for coming.
He has been doing this for two hours.
Shaun.
What are you up to? Alphabetizing our canned goods and checking all the expiration dates.
Well, somebody's got to do it.
Is something wrong? No.
[ EXHALES SHAKILY ] - Okay.
- Okay.
I think Dr.
Lim's patient's diagnosis is wrong, but I can't prove it without information, and I'm not allowed to talk to patients.
- Shaun.
- [ SIGHS ] [ CANS THUDDING ] I want to run with things.
I want to fix people.
Can you help me become a surgical resident again? No.
I can't, Shaun.
- I'm not president - Yes.
[ CAN SCRAPES ] I'm not the president of the hospital anymore, Shaun.
- And even even if I was - [ THUD ] it's irrelevant.
You have to stand up for yourself.
And you know what? If you can't, then the new Head of Surgery, the Chief, he's right.
Now, I can go tell him he's wrong.
It won't do any good.
Or you can go show him.
I'm doing research concerning Sadie Barnes.
She's asleep.
Perfect.
I'm not allowed to speak with her.
I'm looking for her sister Jess.
I haven't seen her.
Sorry.
[ PAPERS RUSTLE ] [ LIGHT CLICKS ] MAN: What are you doing? [ LIGHT CLICKS ] Can you explain why, instead of remaining in pathology as directed, you were in a patient's room, going through her purse? I didn't speak to her.
She was asleep.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] Dr.
Murphy, any reticence I had about removing you from surgery just vanished.
You shouldn't be in contact with patients.
Or their families.
Or anything they own.
Do you understand, or am I gonna be forced to fire you? Sadie's social media says that she finances her climbing travel by working as a freelance food critic.
She reviewed a Japanese restaurant that used to have a Restaurant Grading System Score of "A," but then it dropped to a "C," which corresponds to very bad food safety practices.
Bad sushi can lead to worms, but it usually doesn't because stomach acid almost always kills fish parasites.
But not if someone is taking an acid blocker, which 60 million Americans are.
I saw a bottle in her purse.
Sadie could have sparganosis with an encapsulated worm that is mimicking a meningioma.
That's a good idea.
Excellent.
I'll tell the patient.
I will tell the patient.
I'll tell her we're doing a biopsy to confirm the initial diagnosis.
- But we're - It will tell us if the initial diagnosis is correct.
Your theory is a real long shot.
It would be irresponsible to get her hopes up.
- Hmm.
- The surgery went well.
We were able to extract the entire tumor without complication.
- [ EXHALES SHARPLY ] - [ SIGHS ] Thank you.
When can we start chemo? There are a few follow-up tests we want to run first.
And we want to retake your history.
Make sure we have a proper list of all medications you've been taking.
You want to take his history? After the surgery? What's going on? What are you not telling us? - What went wrong? - Nothing.
The fact is, the surgery went better than we'd hoped.
Your cancer seems to be going away on its own.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] We'll run our tests.
We're confident that there is a medical explanation.
Oh, Clarence.
[ INHALES SHARPLY ] [ DOORBELL RINGS ] [ BIRDS CHIRPING ] - Hi.
- Hi, Aaron.
[ INHALES DEEPLY ] Um, what I What I told you earlier, that I'm seeing someone I'm not.
I mean, I-I-I had one date, - but it wasn't, you know - Okay.
We're We're just We're not a good match.
That's what I wanted to tell you.
That's not true, you know.
You know, that's not true.
You like me.
A lot.
And I like you even more than that.
So what is this? You know, I'd really rather not get into it.
- You came to my house - To tell you what I told you, - which I just told you.
- Okay, you came here to be honest, and you're only gonna be honest halfway? - You're not timid.
- No.
Okay.
Then what? The last time I was here, we were headed upstairs Yes, we were.
You fell.
Yes, I did.
I tried to help you, and you pushed me away.
I was embarrassed.
You were sick.
- You needed help.
- And I'm not sick anymore.
Maybe.
And I want to go and celebrate.
With you.
Specifically with you.
'Cause we have fun.
You You make You make me laugh.
You make me feel good.
I like being with you.
Sounds horrible.
But bad things are gonna happen.
Aaron, I-it can't just be about having fun together.
One of us is gonna get sick, one of us is gonna need to be taken care of Wait, wait, wait.
I just want to go out and have a nice dinner with you.
Not to run away to Reno, find a priest in an Elvis suit.
What are we gonna do, Aaron? Just drive to a hill with a view and neck till prom? And then I'm gonna come home and hope you call? Yeah, uh, you know, I just came to apologize.
I'm sorry.
And I'm really glad I'm I'm glad you're finished with chemo.
And you're gonna you're gonna beat this thing.
Your immunoglobulins are normal.
Everything is normal.
We can't find a scientific explanation.
Our prayers It's a miracle.
Miracle or not, it seems we're on the same page now.
There is no reason not to do the spinal fusion to eliminate your pain.
Do more tests.
- Clarence.
- There are no more tests.
T-T-There must be.
There must be an explanation.
Redo your tests.
Find new tests.
"Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you.
" Ephesians 4:31.
I didn't take you for a believer.
I'm not, anymore.
I'm not sure you are either.
God speaks directly to Noah, Moses, Job, and Solomon.
And now apparently he has singled out Pastor Clarence of San Jose to join the ranks of the prophets.
I'm sorry, but unless there is a burning bush it is narcissistic to think that God has made you his personal project.
God speaks to every one of us, - you just have to listen.
- You are not listening.
People get cancer all the time.
Often that results in pain.
Those things are not unique.
What is unique is having an aggressive metastatic cancer start to disappear without any rational explanation.
The issue isn't God.
You have to forgive yourself.
What I did Cannot be undone.
But your pain can.
Clarence.
Your pain Your pain does no one any good.
[ BREATHES DEEPLY ] Okay.
Osteotome and mallet.
[ MONITOR BEEPING ] You lied when you said you never went to church.
What happened? I didn't want to have this conversation is what happened.
I'm not judging.
My brother took a year off school to travel and came back a non-believer.
So ask him.
Was it freeing, or did you feel empty? Hand me the first polyaxial pedicle screw.
[ BEEPING CONTINUES ] It was like losing a loved one.
[ CLICKING ] The moment of truth.
Follow me.
Our initial diagnosis was wrong.
You don't have a meningioma.
You have a worm in your brain.
And while that sounds fairly gross, it is completely curable.
[ EXHALES SHARPLY ] [ LAUGHS ] So, the sense of doom, it was it was wrong? - It saved your life.
- As did Dr.
Murphy.
This is the pathologist who noticed an abnormality in one of your tests.
That led us to this discovery.
Can I give you a hug, too, Dr.
Murphy? No.
You and your sister will be free to conquer whichever of the remaining 50 peaks you choose as soon as my team surgically removes the worm.
[ JESS LAUGHS ] - Thank you.
- Oh! Of course.
There are not a lot of doctors who would have made the leap that you made today, Shaun.
Good work.
Yes, it was excellent work.
[ CHUCKLES ] Most people would say "thank you," but technically that's not an incorrect response.
Hmm.
Have a good evening.
You've earned it.
[ BEEP ] [ INDISTINCT TALKING OVER P.
A.
] I don't want to go on walks.
I don't want to move on from cases after the tests are done.
I do not want to be a pathologist.
Dr.
Han, you need to make me a surgical resident again.
I appreciate you telling me that.
I was wondering whether you had it in you to advocate for yourself.
But the truth is, Shaun, what you did today, it proved I'm right.
Your skills are tremendous.
Your weaknesses equally significant.
You could be a great pathologist.
Just think of all the Sadies out there, waiting for you to save them.
Dr.
Browne, Dr.
Reznick.
The surgery went well.
Your spine is stable.
I'm scared.
There may still be some residual pain as you heal, but No, I I keep wondering, what if I disobeyed God? You have to have faith.
But you lost yours.
I didn't have a miracle to help me through the dark times.
[ LP'S "MUDDY WATERS" PLAYS ] Hmm Hmm, hmm Oh, oh-oh-oh-oh In the muddy water we're falling Oh, oh-oh-oh-oh In the muddy water we're crawling Hold me down Hold me now Sold me out In the muddy water we're falling