The Good Karma Hospital (2017) s03e06 Episode Script

Season 3, Episode 6

Hey! Stop! Your taxi here! Mr! Edmund.
Time to go to the airport! Time to go to the airport.
Would you mind a quick stop on the way? Amuroor! Amuroor!? Amuroor! Hey, crazy man, coming or not? Grandma, come quick.
Purab, get some help.
Did you not smell the smoke?! Huh? Oh, proof of my alpha maleness.
I can't text and smell at the same time.
- Tommy, I take it? - Mm-hm.
- So how's she doing? - Great.
Yeah.
Um I don't know yet.
She's gonna call me back.
Oh, right, well in that case, I'll skip breakfast and head on in to work.
Mm-hm.
And if I'm not back by eight, I've run off to join the circus.
Yeah, you too.
The diabetes clinic? Again? - Yes.
- Ah.
Funny how this particular rota never seems to rotate, isn't it? It was Diwali, Lidia! And it was just one jalebi! Uh, one plate of jalebi.
- Et tu, Brute? - Is that a medical thing? It's a Shakespeare thing.
Sorry I'm late.
Right.
Moving swiftly on.
It's busy out there this morning, so you'll need to look sharp.
We always do.
Which just leaves Doctor Walker.
Nice of you to join us.
Sorry, um, bit of a cold.
Uh, yep, I'll help Admissions.
And AJ will assist.
Good.
Meeting adjourned.
Thanks, everyone.
Oh, and I'm back to medical school next week.
Drinks on the beach Friday night.
First round is on Dad.
Only if you promise not to return.
Mr.
Marar? Mr.
Marar!? You've just seen Mr Marar.
Huh? You have your shirt inside out? Saashi Nambeesan.
Yes.
Hey, um Let me see.
Sorry.
Can't we see another, doctor? You will find that Dr Walker's eminently capable.
- Don't patronise me.
- She's only trying to help.
Oh, what, by sticking her tongue down your throat? I'm I'm sorry.
She just needs to get some air.
I wasn't born yesterday.
Get your house in order.
Now.
- Mrs.
Nambeesan.
- Yes.
Would you come this way, please? Doctor she doesn't like to make a fuss, but the pain is so bad she can't sleep, sometimes.
Ow! Soft to the touch.
No guarding.
- Any fever or vomiting? - I don't think so.
- Weight stable? - Yes.
Yes.
I really should get back to the shop.
Bowel movements normal? Dhal makes her flatulent, actually.
Tushar! Could you let your wife answer, please? No.
We are not actually married.
Yet.
It was arranged three months ago.
We're both really excited about it.
And when did these pains start? About three months ago.
Bear with us a second.
Right.
Order a full blood count.
I suspect the timing isn't a coincidence.
If I thought I was stuck with that for the rest of my life, I'd be gouging out my eyeballs with a teaspoon.
Over to you.
OK.
I will let her know.
Oh! She's here.
Hold on.
Jyoti doesn't want to come in for a check-up.
We can leave it a week.
But surely someone should keep an eye on her.
We have to respect Jyoti's wishes and Magana's with her 24/7.
Dr Fonseca says it's fine.
Yes, of course.
Yes, I'll let her know.
Thank you.
She's not eating either.
Well, we only discharged her yesterday.
Let's see how she goes over the next few days.
If she doesn't look after herself she will not recover completely! Mari, all we can do is be here for her if she needs us.
I'm very concerned for her, but we have to give her time.
Yes, I know.
That was completely unprofessional and it's none of my business.
It was unprofessional, yes.
But I I do understand that .
.
that you, um Which isn't to say that Look, I don't want What do you want, Gabriel? I mean, do you even know? 'Cause this is killing me.
- Help! Somebody, please! - Please someone come and help us! We found him on the ground Ruby? - Can you hear me Ted? - Ted? I'm here.
I'm with you.
Edmund Dalrymple.
Age 73.
Known Parkinson's disease.
Presented with a syncopal episode.
- You mustn't mustn't - Mustn't what, Ted? - Pulse 88.
- Pyrexia, tachycardia.
Obvious delirium.
Check for a rash? He was in Amuroor during the dengue outbreak.
- There were mozzies everywhere.
- The timing would fit.
He had it as a child.
If it's a different strain, then that would increase his risk of severe complications.
She mustn't mustn't Let's treat him for sepsis, run bloods and start broad spectrum antibiotics.
Ruby Ruby I don't want her here.
Ruby No! No! - Dr Walker, step away.
- No.
You're upsetting the patient.
Squeeze my hand if you want me to stay, Ted.
Dr Walker! Ruby Please.
Saashi.
I mean, listen.
Saashi, please think about it, dear.
If there's nothing wrong with me, then I can discharge myself Absolutely not.
Dr, please tell her.
I'm afraid there's no medical reason for me to keep her here.
This is our sari shop.
And I'd like to give you a special discount for your kindness.
Goodbye.
Saashi.
So what's causing the pain? Idiopathic abdominal pain is often caused by stress.
Perhaps the arranged marriage Saashi and I have been childhood sweethearts since the age of 14.
She asked me to marry her! Uh Perhaps Perhaps she's worried about the wedding night? Doctor, if she drops dead, I'm gonna sue you for medical negligence! Everything alright? Should I have admitted her for observation? On what grounds? Her blood tests have all come back normal.
It's functional abdominal pain.
Impossible to prove.
But what if I missed something? Ah, consider it a rite of passage.
You know, I remember the things I missed as a student Cauda equina.
An aortic dissection.
- Did it work out OK in the end? - Well, sure it did.
Apart from the paralysis and death.
OK, Dad.
Thank you for the reassurance.
You're welcome! - Excuse me - Hi.
What was wrong with the man we just brought in? We're not sure.
They're running some tests.
He'll be OK, right? He's in good hands.
The best.
Strange part of town for a tourist to be in.
I think he was looking for someone he once loved.
That's that's very romantic.
Yeah.
I used to think so too.
Now I think love's a mug's game.
Maybe.
OK.
Thank you.
Dina! Dina let's go! Wait! Hey! Wait! Stop! Ruby.
Edmund's been asking for you.
It's not dengue.
His symptoms are just a result of the medication wearing off, so we will need to adjust the dosage, but he should be fine.
Now, look, I meant to say earlier .
.
you're not looking so good.
Anyone can see this is more than a cold.
And I know that you're hurt and I'm sorry, that is my fault.
But coming to work hungover Just please don't take it out on your liver, OK? You really do think everything is just about you, don't you? Well, this is.
Isn't it? You know, I used to think the arrogant act was just a way of covering up your crap social skills but .
.
no.
You are a properly self-obsessed .
.
dickhead.
You're afraid of anyone, getting close.
You're just an empty shell, incapable of connecting on any meaningful level with anyone.
Or just incapable of connecting with you.
I hope you don't mind.
I went to the market on my lunch-break.
It's all my childhood favourites.
Laddu.
Jalebi.
Kheer.
I couldn't find any pomegranate, but that's my favourite too.
OK.
I told you.
No visitors! I can come back later.
If this is a bad time No, I don't want you to come back later.
I am not going to leave, Jyoti.
I've come to see you.
Look .
.
none of this is your fault.
I should never have said the things I did.
That was cruel.
I'm sorry.
Now consider yourself absolved and just leave me alone.
I understand how you're feeling.
No, you don't! You don't! You've no idea what I'm going through.
Just go! JUST GO! So, did Tushar ask you to check up on me? No, I was just passing.
Needed a kurta for a wedding.
OK.
I'm sorry.
I thought I might have missed something at the hospital.
There's no time for standing around chatting, Saashi.
That guy will be here any moment.
At least try and pretend to be busy till he's signs the lease.
Come.
Come away.
You're selling the business? Ah, Mr.
Mukherjee! Come in, come in.
This way, please.
Our solicitor has drawn up paperwork for us.
- We are good to go.
- Fantastic.
- Yeah.
- Ow! Oh, Saashi? Saashi, are you OK? I just thought you'd like to know that Kochi burns unit have agreed to see Jyoti.
We'll make an appointment with the therapist as soon as to make sure she gets the specialist psychological support she needs.
What's happened, Mari? I ignored your advice.
She threw a platter of food at me.
Her not eating has nothing to do with hunger.
Or lack of it.
It's to do with taking back control.
I'm sure you're right.
I mean, you've lived through a similar experience, after all.
Jyoti has the best possible care right at hand.
Personal care.
I think, it's important to maintain a professional distance.
Important to whom? Last time we let her walk away, she tried to take her own life.
So I will keep going back, and she can throw a platter of food at me every single night if she wants too.
But I won't give up on her just because it makes me feel uncomfortable.
And neither should you.
I preferred your sloth.
Wait till you see my meerkat.
No word from Tommy? She's probably just got caught up with the kid.
You know.
Ben.
Your grandson's called Ben.
Is it possible to miss someone you've never met? She'll call when she's ready.
Bad day? When we first met .
.
did my arm bother you? 'Course not.
You used to cover it up more.
When we first met.
- Did I? - Yeah.
I don't remember that.
I'm feeling under pressure now to say something profound.
- Well, don't.
- About inner strength and beauty.
Oh, shut up and show me your meerkat.
And it's the same side as before.
You're sure? 100%.
I think I'll tell Mr Mukherjee we'll reschedule.
Ohhh.
You know, this morning .
.
you said the pain was on the other side.
There's no pain, is there, Saashi? OK.
So why pretend? I love Tushar, OK.
It's not that I don't love him.
But I promised that once we are married, I will quit all of this.
So your father's selling up because he can't cope on his own? No.
He can't wait to retire.
And Tushar has bought a four-bedroomed house, so there's going to be plenty of space for my father.
And the little ones, when they arrive.
You don't want kids? I do.
But, you know, I can't give all this up just to become a housewife in a gated domestic compound.
It's, it's not me.
OK, so you want a more modern marriage.
Yeah.
Probably.
You know, I streamlined all our stock, I cut down on expenses.
I even changed the suppliers.
In a couple of more months, if I continue like this, I will have saved enough to turn in a profit.
That's when I can prove that I can run this business by myself.
If they'd let me.
So tell them that.
I'm not ready.
Saashi, I would say you are ready for anything.
Now there's a sight for sore eyes.
Glad you're feeling better.
I should be halfway to London by now.
You don't look like yourself.
Yeah, well, that's because I've been worried sick about you! It was Dina, wasn't it .
.
who brought you in? I just wanted to see her one last time.
Selfish, I know.
But I paid the price.
Now all she'll remember of Ted Dalrymple is a doddering, sick old man.
I've been a damn fool, Ruby.
I let her break my heart and without ever giving it away.
Do you mind if I sit with you a bit? My shift's nearly over.
You do look quite het up.
Just a Just a run-in with a colleague.
It's nothing.
Now stop worrying about me and get some rest.
OK? Does that say milligrams or micrograms? I don't know.
Honestly, Dr Walker's handwriting is completely illegible.
Well, nobody's perfect are they? Sorry.
I'll have a word.
Ruby.
Ruby? Ruby? Uh Hello! Can you hear me? Wh what's happened? Help! Help! Medical assistance, now! Male ward, bed three! - Ruby? - What happened? - Stop! Come this way.
- I don't know.
She looked unwell earlier.
I thought she was hungover or something She she was very tired.
OK.
Lift.
- How long has she been unconscious? - I don't know.
Airway's clear.
Thready pulse.
Central cyanosis.
Casualty.
- Vitals? - Pulse.
Barely palpable.
BP 80 over 40.
She was treating patients during the dengue outbreak.
I should have picked it up sooner.
- Has she got a rash? - Let's check.
- Nothing.
- Here.
Petechial rash spreading.
That's dengue.
She could be in hypovolemic shock.
We need to look at her heart.
Get the ultrasound in here now.
Ultrasound.
What can I do? It's OK, I've got it.
The upper aorta is clear.
Back up a bit.
There.
- Can you see that? - Cardiac tamponade.
She's in obstructive shock.
We have to clear the fluid immediately so her heart can start pumping properly again.
OK.
I'll prep for a pericardiocentesis.
Shall I call Lydia to perform it? - I've already left a message.
- We don't have any time.
We have to shift her to the theatre now or she'll die.
- I'll do it.
- Maybe Dr Nair should do it I said I'd do it! We'll talk about that in the theatre.
Get going! She may only have a few minutes.
We have to extract the fluid from around her heart before it's too late.
The correct angle of the needle is crucial.
I know.
45 degrees to the sternum.
Right.
Vitals are dropping.
No.
No.
Too steep.
You've missed the pericardium.
Let me go again.
Better.
Come on.
Come on.
- You've got it.
- Aspirating.
That's it.
It's cleared.
Good work, Dr Varma.
Stats are still going down.
Her heart rate should have picked up by now.
It makes no sense.
If the fluid is drained and she hasn't rallied, then there's something else.
I don't understand.
- I removed the fluid.
- The effusion's barely visible.
- It was much worse? - Yes.
OK, tell me her vitals.
Pulse 150.
BP can't be read at all and the SATS trace is poor.
Her blood oxygen is too low.
We're missing something.
Dr Varma? - Shall I get adrenaline? - Just give me a minute, please! Tension pneumothorax? If the needle has nicked the lung, then Then that would explain the stats.
Prep for a thoracostomy Now.
Her lung is punctured.
Come on, come on, come on.
We need to release the pressure on her lungs right away.
- I'll prep a number nine drain.
- No time.
Move aside.
We'll do it the old fashioned way and make a bloody big hole.
Come on, Ruby.
I heard a hiss of air.
Stats picking up.
She's breathing.
Welcome back, Dr Walker.
Fine work, Dr Fonseca.
Fine work indeed.
- Hey.
- Hey.
Ruby, I'm so sorry.
I'm so sorry.
About everything.
Last night, I, um Last night I thought you.
I couldn't really imagine a world without you because I love you.
Did my heart literally have to stop for you to be able to say that out loud? Yes.
And I am a What was the word you used? Was it? Yeah.
Yeah.
Dickhead.
- Yes, I am a dickhead.
- Yeah.
You're a dickhead.
So she's going to be OK.
That's great news.
Yeah, it really is.
Well, not least because I ordered a boat load of liquor for AJ's leaving party tomorrow.
Of course you have.
And I am not stuffing 10 pound of samosas by meself.
Has Tommy called? No.
OK.
Look, I'll be home soon, I promise.
I've just got one quick house call to make.
- OK, love.
I'll see you later.
- Yeah.
See ya.
Jyoti, if you don't eat something soon, I'm going to have to re-admit you.
Look .
.
I'm not gonna tell you that it gets easier.
Or that you'll feel stronger.
Or people will see past it.
Even though they will, eventually.
I just want you to know that you are not alone.
Believe it or not .
.
I have no regrets.
I'm actually quite proud of my scar.
I didn't always feel like that.
I used to act like I didn't care, even though I did .
.
just to get through the day.
And then at some point, I realised .
.
I wasn't acting anymore.
I didn't care.
And you know what? No-one else did either.
I know right now you feel .
.
frightened, powerless.
And that is completely natural.
But if you remember you're more than just the skin on your face and stop letting it define you, I think you'll find it quite simply won't anymore.
Is that seat taken? Please help yourself.
Dina? I didn't know if I should come back.
But I wanted to see you.
I shouldn't have come looking for you.
I'd no right.
I'm not about to throw myself into your arms, Teddy.
- This is not a film.
- No.
But it's good to see you.
Not much to look at, I'm afraid.
- I'm sorry you're not well.
- I'm dying.
We're all dying, aren't we? Just some faster than others.
I've been so worried.
About things turning out for you.
Has life been kind? I've lived a long and happy life, Teddy.
I married a man I respect and have a home full of children and grandchildren I would never do without.
But, Teddy .
.
you'll always have a very special place in my heart.
I love you.
I know, I know.
It's easy to love from afar.
But building a life together, raising children, putting your heart on the line every single day .
.
takes courage.
Sometimes love just isn't enough.
Goodbye, Teddy, and good luck.
You OK? Yes.
But we need to talk.
It's natural to react like that when you're scared of losing someone you love.
I want to do this differently but, uh .
.
I don't know how.
- I never meant to hurt you.
- I shouldn't have ever come here.
I should have known better.
It wasn't fair.
I wanted it all.
Maybe you did too.
I don't think you have it all to give, do you? And now you'll break her heart too, won't you? Dr Nair? - Dr Nair? - Ah, that's my father's name.
You can call me AJ.
I wanted to apologise for the other day, for wasting your time like that.
And give you an outfit.
For the wedding you're going to? Wow, that's, uh There was no wedding.
There is now.
Next March.
Here in Barco.
- And you are invited.
- What, you're staying? Yes.
Tushar has finally agreed to help me run the family business.
With my father's blessings, of course.
But yes.
See, I love my fiance for her drive and passion and wouldn't want it any other way.
Also I'm a little bit scared of her so That's an excellent foundation for a long lasting marriage.
Let's see what in here.
- Do you like? - Hey, yeah, that's, um - It's beautiful.
- You're welcome.
Right then.
We'll see you in March, then? AJ? - Yeah.
Yeah, of course.
- Thank you.
Thank you.
Lovely to see you.
You remembered.
Pomegranates.
Thank you.
- Thank you.
- Come here.
Oh, sorry.
Welcome back.
OK, guys, check this out.
- Oh, my God.
What is that? - What you don't like it? Maybe you should use it as a tablecloth? - Yeah.
Very funny.
- Actually I think it's very fetching.
Lydia loves it when I dress up.
That's a bit too much information! No, I didn't mean It's not exactly a cod piece, is it? - Is he alright? - Frankly, I don't know.
Lydia.
Lydia, it's Tommy.
Hello, love! Hello, can you hear me? No, I'm just going away somewhere quiet.
Yeah.
OK.
- Is that a better signal - Hi, Dad! Can you hear me now? I say, it's about bloody time.
I thought you'd forgotten all about your old man.
Oh, ah! Is that? Oh! Hi, Ben! Oh, that is a very fine eyebrow! How come it's dark where you are? You're five hours behind, aren't you? Turn around.
Dad.
Oh.
Oh! Hello! Hello! How are you? Ben, meet your grandad.
Hello, little fella! - I know.
- Oh, no, no.
It's alright.
It's alright.
I know he looks a bit funny, but he's quite alright once you get used to him.
I always liked coming off the night shift.
This time of day, watching the sun come up while the rest of the world sleeps.
The promise of a new day.
Thank you for taking care of me.
I was just doing my job.
It takes its toll.
Dr Walker is made of strong stuff.
She has a big heart.
And a soft spot for lost causes.
Mind how you go, Dr Varma.