Titanic: Blood and Steel (2012) s01e02 Episode Script

Stained Steel

1 Right, lads, we're going for 450 today.
Good thing, I could use the money.
Really, Jimmy? Tell me this, where does all that money go to? Down my neck.
What are you laughing at? Nothing.
Good.
Fill up that barrel and I'll show you how it's done.
How's the baby, Arthur? Aye, he's happy enough when he's fed.
He's a keeper! He's certainly a bawler.
Takes after his father, then always complaining.
Is that right? Look who's talkin'! Alright, lads, let's get to it.
Yes, Mr McCann, sir! Good morning.
Good morning, sir.
I need someone to draw something for me.
Would you be free? Can I help you, Doctor Muir? Yes.
I need some drawings done in my lab.
I've asked Miss Silvestri to assist me.
I'm sure that can be arranged.
Great.
One hour.
Fine.
(HUSTLE AND BUSTLE AT THE SHIPYARD) (WORKMAN CALLS OUT) There's been a lock-out at Stokes Yard! Did yous hear that? Lads, there's a lock-out at Stokes Yard.
Stokes Yard must have locked out the union men.
Did you hear that, boys? Let's go.
(JACK) What do we need them for? Confetti, son.
Belfast confetti.
You'll see.
Oi, you lot, get back to work!! Keep going, boys! To the gates! (WORKMAN) Traitors, you're taking our jobs! (HUSTLE AND BUSTLE) (UNINTELLIGABLE YELLING) Come on, lads! What are you doing? (WORKMAN) Traitors! (SHOUTS) You filthy scabs! (UNINTELLIGABLE CHANTING) (SHOUTS) I TOLD YOU TO CALM! LAY DOWN YOUR ARMS!! (SHOUTS) It is NOT the men behind these gates who are your foe! Walk through these gates for justice and freedom.
You men .
.
I know your minds.
I know what desperation, what needs, what false promises brought you here! But I say to you - lay down your tools.
They are the instruments of Judas.
There is no prize SO high that can merit the betrayal of your brothers! (SHOUTS) Lay down your tools and join our struggle.
(WORKMEN) Join us! (WORKMEN CHANT) Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! Join us! (CHEERING) About 300 men left their posts all in all.
Then send a message, Pirrie.
Gentlemen, I am under contract.
I can't afford long delays due either to mass firings or industrial action.
No, Pirrie, YOU have to show a strong hand.
I'll tell you what I'm doing - bolting the door to my coal yard.
And do you think that will help the situation? Well, no union man will cross my threshold.
Let them stay out 'til their bellies are empty and their wills are broken.
I'm afraid we can't afford that luxury, even if I were minded to do it! And there's a wider principle.
The time, perhaps, has come to realise that the working man will not always remain supine.
And if we provoke him 'Provoke him'? What are you talking about? I'm talking about locking him out of his place of work.
'His' place of work? I own that yard.
(WHISPERS) Hundreds went out, they say, Pitched battle.
Is Michael alright? Yes.
And Walter? Yes.
Seems to be.
Thank you for coming.
You alright? Yes, I'm fine.
Why shouldn't I be? Um, there's justa lot of mayhem out there today.
Yeah.
It doesn't affect management, does it? No, II guess it doesn't.
At least it's all calm out there for now.
Yes.
Everyone back in their place.
That's not what I meant.
Um, I've nothing against a man making a stand.
Really? Would you like to have a look? Oh.
Mmm.
Come on.
Yes, um Look down in there.
Here? Mmm-hmm.
Like this? (CHUCKLES) (CLEARS HIS THROAT) May I? Oh! Do you see the image reflected in the glass? Yes.
What is it? Ferrite, pearlite and inclusions.
Oh! (CHUCKLES) But what are they? Impurities, Miss Silvestri, in the steel.
And, and your job is to get rid of them? No, my job is to make the best of an imperfect substance.
Oh right.
I'll draw it so you can make the best of all our imperfections! Right, I'll leave you to it.
It was a good day.
We shouldn't assume it's a victory.
Just the first shots fired in a long war.
Now! I don't think anybody's talking about victory.
Not yet.
If the management want a war, that's what we should give them.
As long as there's lock-outs, use of scab labour, no injury compensation, we have to fight.
Do you mean a strike? Certainly that.
Withdrawal of labour is the chief weapon of the working man.
It's our strongest tool.
If there's gonna be strikes, we need to tighten our belts.
We're used to being hungry.
They're not.
I don't know how many men we'll get out at the yard.
- Most of us have a pride in what we're building.
- Then use it.
Use the symbol of that ship as YOUR power, not the management's.
Make Titanic YOUR issue, not theirs.
Remember our brothers in Russia.
It was on the battleship Potemkin that the movement arose.
This ship, this could be the site of your battle.
No plans for tonight, then, Doctor Muir? No.
Not for me.
Do you mind if I sit with you? Oh, please.
My husband told me about what happened at Stokes coal yard today.
Albert says there's Catholics at the base of all the trouble.
Is that what you think, Mrs Hatton? I really don't know about politics.
It's sad, though .
.
in a way.
Isn't it? Yes.
All this strife.
Quite sad.
It must seem a little strange if you're from the mainland.
(CHUCKLES) Yeah.
Quite different from the mainland.
Do you think we're all mad? No, I don't.
To be honest, Doctor Muir .
.
I sometimes think we are.
I've conducted examinations on the latest batch of steel plates and I believe there are serious grounds for concern.
I've tested the tensile strengths of the steel you use, and, as you can see, the steel cracks under quite modest stresses.
I have to tell you, Muir, this steel is sourced from a very reliable supplier.
That as it may be, it contains far too many impurities.
It's dangerously brittle.
'Dangerously?' Yes.
This is a very serious claim.
Yes, I'm aware.
Alright.
I'll take this matter up with Lord Pirrie and deal with it in due course.
And when will that be? This will be done as soon as I can.
Why don't I bring them now? (ANGRY) Because I said this will be done as soon as possible.
I will decide when.
Muir, there are procedures in this office.
And I would remind you that I am Chief Designer on this project.
Trust I take this issue as seriously as you.
(DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES) And it is very likely that this industrial action will spread .
.
causing considerable shortages.
Stokes Yard remains closed and our coal supplies are threatened.
Electrical supplies are affected, as are transport facilities.
I shall need a precise inventory from everyone on the exact state of our supplies and our reserves.
Do we have any idea how long this 'business' is going to continue? No, Grey.
It's very difficult to predict.
I've spoken to other businesses but .
.
both sides seem obdurate.
We may well be in for the long haul.
I cannot build my engines in time if I don't have coal.
And what do we do if our men go out? (WOMAN) Yes.
Hello there, Doctor Muir.
How is it coming along? Remains to be seen.
Were my drawings not of some use? Er, they were great.
Oh.
Perfect, actually.
Whether the import of what they show is appreciatedwe'll see.
Why is it so hard to communicate a simple truth? Tell me.
(CHUCKLES) Because people don't listen.
Hmmm.
Why is that? Because they believe what they want to.
They don't hear what they don't want to or see what's in front of them.
Because people believe what they want to believe.
That's true.
Yeah.
It's human nature.
If you want to persuade, you have to take human nature into account.
I've never been very good at that.
That's because you are frustrated by it.
I am.
(CHUCKLES) You're right.
So, what are the implications? Well .
.
we don't know.
It does seem strange.
Well, if there IS something wrong with the steel IF! But I mean, Cunard, Orient, in fact all our major competitors, use it and nobody's ship has fallen apart yet as far as I know.
What are we to do? Speak to the Board of Trade.
Let's bring the matter up with Carruthers.
Yeah, that sounds sensible, but it does bother me.
I mean, Muir wouldn't make this up, would he? I suppose not.
I know you don't like him.
Actually, that's not true.
Yes, he irritates me.
But he's young.
He speaks out of turn.
He's arrogant.
All youthful qualities.
He'll learn.
(WORKMAN) Watch your back! Watch the swing.
Bring it down, that's it.
Watch the swing.
Come on, lads, keep it going! Steady there, Jim! What's his problem? Ah, Jimmy's probably thirsty! You're not bloody wrong! (CRASHING NOISE) (SCREAMS) Jesus!!! (SHOUTS) Heave! (SCREAMS) (SCREAMS) Jimmy! Is it bad?!! You're alright.
Come on.
You're alright, it's not that bad.
Jack, away for the doctor! My family.
What am I gonna do?!! What am I gonna do?!!! Don't worry about that.
Until you heal, we'll look after ye.
Promise.
(GROANS) (SONG) # I wonder who's kissing her now? (KITTY ALSO SINGS ALONG) # I wonder who's teaching her how? I wonder who's looking into her eyes? Breathing sighs, telling lies.
I wonder who's buying the wine? Muir, what do you say to a little wager? The length of the lake and back.
Ah, it's a bit cold for that, isn't it? It's just a bit of fun.
Oh, for God's sake, Ashley! You can have a head start if you need one.
No, don't need a head start.
Well, let's have it then.
Oh, come on, Muir! Oh, come on, Muir, what's the matter? Can't you swim? No, actually, I can't.
(CHUCKLES) I'll have that guinea off you, Stokes.
Alright, Berkeley, you're on.
How very attractive.
I would have liked to have seen you at least prepare for the race.
Two! Three! Go! The problem with the British public schoolboy is that his emotional development is permanently arrested at the age of 18.
You didn't attend such an institution, I take it? No, I went to a localgrammar school.
I thought so.
You have something of the real world about you.
Shall I take that as a compliment? Oh certainly! Of course, I have made only infrequent trips to the real world and hardly know it at all.
The gilded cage has its advantages but the company one is obliged to keep is not always one of them.
Then you should get out of the cage.
I wonder if I'm brave enough? You don't strike me as the timid type.
In my own world, I am indeed quite courageous.
Yes.
I'm not sure I'd cope with poverty.
One must know one's limits.
Woo hoo! Come on! Don't let him win! Come on, Berkeley! Come on, Ashley! Come on! Come on! (CHUCKLES) That's a guinea you owe me, Ashley! Are you good for it? Shut up! That's the man I'm meant to marry.
I would've beaten him if I hadn't got my foot stuck in a bloody weed.
Rank does have its privileges but .
.
there's always a price to pay.
Do you pity me, Mark? Perhaps in that senseyes.
Good book? Not bad.
Racy stuff! (SIGHS) I'd like a wild love affair like this.
(CHUCKLES) I'm sure you would! Papa will be marrying me off to some bloody Italian before long.
What about Michael? McCann? Mmm-hmm.
What about him? He likes you.
I know.
He is nice .
.
but he's boring, isn't he? (CHUCKLES) I think you can't marry someone who bores you.
And if you do, you'll never feel like this.
(READS) He kissed her, held her to his chest as the ocean swelled above them.
But, Violetta!! (THEY BOTH CHUCKLE) What would Father Thomas say? Who do you think I got this from! Really?! (CHUCKLES) No! Join the union! Stand united with your fellow workers! Support the locked-out men! Support the families of the striking workers! Join the union! Unite against scabbing! Join the National Union of Dock Labourers.
In togetherness, there is strength! Join a union! Join a union! (UNINTELLIGABLE CHATTER) Good morning.
The gates of these works will remain locked until every man and woman who works here renounces the union.
(CROWD YELLS IN PROTEST) What's going on? Sounds like Hatton.
Calm down, calm down! Do I make myself clear? There will be no work here until everybody renounces the union.
Oh my God, it's a lock-out! What am I going to do? Go home or stay and protest.
You! Do you renounce the union? No, I do not! Away home with you then.
Enough is enough, I'm going to work! Away home with you.
Stop that man! (COMMOTION) Go home, Violetta.
Go! (CROWD YELLS AND SHOUTS) Go down.
We'd better get to work.
Another lock-out! Another attempt by those in management to intimidate the worker.
Denying the opportunities of employment, security.
Denying you your God given right to bargain.
(CROWD CHEERS) But we will not suffer this tyranny! For we will stand up in demonstration of our steel, our might, our resolve! (CROWD CHEERS) So, in solidarity with our brothers and sisters at Carlton Electric, with all those that have been locked out across this city, we will lay down our tools.
Who IS that man? I think his name's McCann.
Then you will see how management are forced to listen to our demands.
(CALLS OUT) Mr McCann! Morning, sir.
Mr Andrews.
Are you the, er, the leader of these men, Mr McCann? Yes, I speak for them.
And what is your grievance? Sir, all across this city, workers are being denied their rights.
Even now, honest working men and women are being locked out on a whim.
Denied the basic sustenance of life, because they demand the right to representation.
And you fear the same may happen here? Will it? No.
You will not deny us the rights of union membership? No.
On the contrary, I welcome dialogue as long as it remains cordial, constructive and is conducted in a civilised manner.
All I ask is that you don't endanger the work we're doing here with any violent or precipitate action.
Come and speak with me.
My door is open.
(CLEARS HIS THROAT) Signor Pietro? Mmm? I think the time has come.
With your permission, I would like to ask for Sofia's hand in marriage.
Already? Is it too early? No, it's perfect.
(CHUCKLES) You know, I could do with another man in the family! (CHUCKLES) Thank you.
(SIGHS) Big weight off my mind.
(CHUCKLES) Something to celebrate.
Umshhh.
(CHUCKLES) Ahh! Salute! Salute! I have to tell you, sir, that I'm very worried about the way Mr Andrews brushes my concerns under the carpet.
I can assure you he doesn't.
He's raised all your concerns with me.
Well then, I'm surprised that you don't act.
My boy(SIGHS).
.
I know you worked for the Royal Navy and I know the uncompromising standards they set, but ours is a business.
And we stay strictly within all maritime regulations that His Majesty's government sees fit to impose.
Do you know, Thomas Andrews has great experience in this yard? He hasn't risen because he's my nephew.
He started working here at the age of 16.
He's progressed through every level of the company.
There's no-one who knows shipbuilding better.
Hmm.
Including me.
Come on.
(CHILDREN LAUGHING) (GIRL CALLS OUT) Daddy! When are you meeting him? Next week.
Justbe careful.
It could be a trap.
He, he could be stalling.
They're on a deadline with Titanic.
(INTERRUPTS) I know.
There's strategy to both sides of this.
Just need to be prepared.
That's all I'm saying.
Thanks, Ma.
Full house, eh? Conor!!! (CHUCKLES) Hey, sis, you're looking well.
Would you look at who's come home! (MUMBLES) Ma.
Conor.
Good to see you.
I missed you.
Me too.
Look at you! Did the British Army not feed you at all? I'm alright.
Conor.
Michael.
And what way is that to greet your little brother? Ah, it's good to be home! (EMILY CHUCKLES) How long are you home for? Till it's time to move off again, I guess.
So, what about the Army then? Did they let you go? In a way.
I did help with their decision by smacking my sergeant in the face, but they were quite nice about it.
Three months in the clink and a dishonourable discharge.
I'd say me and the Army parted on good terms! That's why no letters, then? They don't let you write from the clink.
You never wrote in the first place.
No need to write now.
Back in the bosom of my family, eh? Cheers.
Cheers.
Cheers.
It is my privilege to introduce a comrade in our great struggle.
She is a woman who has thrown away the shackles of her class and devoted herself to the plight of the working men and women throughout this island.
I ask you to welcome Constance Markievicz.
I take it as a GREAT compliment to appear here before you, the BOLD working people of Belfast.
But it is to the women I address myself most, for it is you who stand at the front of any revolution.
You who bear the brunt of oppression.
And yet a strong tide of liberty .
.
is coming towards us carrying before it all the outposts that hold women enslaved and bearing them triumphantly into the life of the nation to which they belong.
So I say to you .
.
don't trust your feminine charm and your capacity for getting on the soft side of men.
A consciousness of your own dignity and worth must be encouraged.
Get away from wrong ideals and false standards of womanhood.
Escape your domestic rut.
Be .
.
as free as your dream of the future would have you.
(WOMAN) Woo! Is this all I get? Times are hard.
We've little money coming in.
But with you out of work, I'm the only one who's earning.
It has to make do for all of us.
When's this nonsense gonna end? When Sir Henry opens the factory and those striking bastards see sense.
Albert! Your language! Well, they are! Anyway, we can last longer than they can.
(DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES) We'll starve them out of it.
Sorry I'm late.
Very busy with work.
That's alright, Doctor Muir.
I'll give you your dinner.
Thank you.
Oh, thiscame for you.
Oh.
Hmmm.
It'sfrom Lady Carlton.
Oh.
(CHUCKLES) An invitation .
.
to the races.
Get the man some dinner there, Edith.
Of course.
(UPBEAT JAZZ MUSIC) Oh come on! Can I go again?! Can I go again, please?! (UINTELLIGABLE CHATTER) Oh no! Do it again! Hello, Kitty.
Hello, Doctor Muir.
(TO GIRL) Hello.
Hello.
So glad you could join us.
It was nice of your mother to invite me.
It was nice of me to ask her to! (CHUCKLES) I need someone to talk to at these events.
I will never understand the attraction of this sport.
Over-bred nags and their over-bred owners hurtling pointlessly around in large circles.
(CHUCKLES) Bores me to extinction.
Do it! My turn! (CHUCKLES) Okay, one more.
Oh, good, just in time.
(BELL RINGS) (SHOUTS) There she goes.
Caramel Nugget! Come on, Guinevere! Come on!! Yes, Guinevere, come on! Yes! Come on, Caramel Nugget!! COME ON! Doesn't Daddy look just perfectly absurd? Come on, Guinevere! Come on! He's obsessed.
He's more interested in the sex life of his horses than his own.
(SHOUTS) Come on, you beauty! Yes, come on! Come on! (CROWD YELLS) Go, Guinevere! Go! (CROWD CHEERS) (SHOUTS) Move it! Come on! Keep going! COME ON! (RAPTUROUS CHEERING) (VIOLETTA) Woo hoo! Yes! Ahhh! I knew it! I told ya! You won something? A bob and a half.
Yay! Conor's rich! Ice creams are on you then! For everyone? I'll give you a hand.
Let me introduce you to Lady Guinevere.
Daddy wildly prefers her to mummy, you know.
He does? Yes.
There's a distinct physical resemblance, but Lady Guinevere wins on personality and general intellect.
(CHUCKLES) Now this is Diamond Jim and this is Cleopatra.
She's mine.
She's beautiful.
Yes, I suppose.
Well, it looks like Lady Guinevere's not back yet.
So we'll just have to wait.
Hmm.
Well, come on.
Kiss me.
Don't you want to? (GIGGLES) Alright, miss? Oh!! Liam! Let's go get a drink! What a nice day.
Are you happy? Yes.
Yes.
Listen.
I have something very important to ask you.
Sofia, I have known you for a little while now.
We have grown very fond of each other.
And I believe there's a good future for us.
Sofia Silvestri, I would like you to become my wife.
I find the best thing for a poorly back is the juice of one lemon mixed with salt, twice a day.
It really works.
I will give it a try.
Aye, you should.
(DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES) No point suffering in silence! Well? Well, what? Where's Andrea? He's gone home.
Why? Because .
.
for God's sake, Papa.
You know he asked me to marry him! And? And I told him I didn't want to.
Sofia, what are you saying? I turned him down.
You.
.
? You.
.
? What?! I will decide who I marry and when, if I want to get married at all! You have disgraced me!! I have disgraced no-one! How can we be sure this talk isn't a device to keep us quiet? How do we know we're not being strung along? You don't.
It's a matter of trust and goodwill between both parties.
Can we trust you, Lord Pirrie? I hope so.
You realise we have the power to call our men out any time? Yes.
And we will, if the situation in this city does not improve.
I can't stop you, Mr McCann.
Though I would urge you to consider this: the prosperity of this city depends upon the prosperity of this yard.
Mr McCann, if we fail to complete the ship we're building, if we fail to deliver Titanic, this yard may very well be destroyed! You might destroy me and other employers, but also yourselves.
Wouldn't that be something of a Pyrrhic victory? Yes.
The phrase means a victory .
.
that is self-defeating.
From King Pyrrhus of Epirus.
He beat the Romans, but destroyed himself in the process.
(CHUCKLES) Quite! All we're asking for, my Lord, is the prosperity you speak of be more equitably spread.
Injury and death are commonplace in shipbuilding.
Shipwrights should receive realistic compensation for injuries sustained in the workplace, not just what management thinks is appropriate.
Make no mistake, an injury here can put an entire family in the poorhouse.
(MELLOW PIANO MUSIC) I got your note.
I never thought to see you back here.
Have you been hiding from me? No, son.
It's not as simple as that.
Look at you.
A fine man.
Why d'you come back? Er, they've offered me a job on the Titanic.
I'm a metallurgist.
I work with the steel.
A management position? (SOFTLY) Yeah.
Do they know you're a Catholic? No.
They don't.
(CHUCKLES) You're in the belly of the beast, son.
I know it's a risk.
I've thought it through so.
.
! I also thought I'd get a chance to see my old man.
(GENTLY) Where are you living? How are you living? Are you okay? It's good to see you, son.
(SOFTLY) Yeah.