Touched by an Angel (1994) s03e24 Episode Script

Missing in Action

(CHILDREN CHATTERING) TESS: His name is George, but he calls himself the Colonel.
MONICA: I know.
He joined the forces back in 1940.
George has served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam.
Well, well, some little angel's been sticking her halo in where it doesn't belong.
No, Tess, I just wanted to save you the trouble.
I thought I'd check it out, do some homework, get the facts straight.
The Colonel is a big war hero.
That's what all those medals are for.
He fought side by side with General Patton.
You know, Old Blood and Guts.
Where did you hear all that? I heard it at the retirement home where he lives.
He was tellin' this old lady.
She must've been over 80 and a wee bit hard of hearing.
Yes, I know what my assignment here is.
Is that so? It's obvious, Tess.
George has been kicked out of six retirement homes in the last couple of years.
He's angry, he's unhappy, he's old, and it's my job to help him find the joy in living again.
Watch this.
Hello.
I love children.
When it comes right down to it, I think we're all children at heart, don't you? What a lively little battle.
A lively little battle? War is not fun and games.
War is hell.
I didn't mean Oh, that's the trouble with you young people today.
You haven't been around long enough to know what you mean.
I was just trying to make him feel better.
Well, maybe he doesn't wanna feel any better.
Maybe he wants to feel understood, and for that to happen, you're going to have to stop looking at him as old, and he's gonna have to stop thinking of you as young.
I think both of you need a push.
Tess.
Tess, what's happening to me? Don't worry, baby, you're still the sweet angel girl you've always been.
The only way you can get George to face the truth is with a face he can trust.
What? Oh, the hearing, always the first to go.
♫ When you walk down the road ♫ Heavy burden, heavy load ♫ I will rise and I will walk with you ♫ I'll walk with you till the sun don't even shine ♫ Walk with you, every time ♫ I tell you I'll walk with you ♫ Walk with you ♫ Believe me I'll walk with you ♫ STEPHANIE: All right, dear, come along.
This way.
Easy does it.
Welcome to our new room.
I beg your pardon? Oh, I said welcome to our new room.
Oh, we're looking a little tuckered out.
We? This is your bed, right next to the window.
Oh, the last resident complained that the sun comes up too early through these curtains, but there's nothing I can do about that.
This is an east facing window, and it's the only room I have available right now.
Ah, well, don't you worry about me, Mrs.
Hancock.
I love the sunshine, and sure, isn't it very good for the plastic plants? We win bonus points for cheerfulness.
Now, Monica, this is the button we press if we fall out of bed.
Oh, we're gonna have to get you some nice crepe-soled shoes.
Oh, meanwhile, we can use this.
Ella won't be needing it anymore.
W-W-What happened to Ella? Ella isn't with us anymore.
Ah, you mean she died? Oh, we don't use that word.
It's the same reason we use plastic plants.
Life ever-lasting, and all that.
It's very natural for people and plants to live, to grow, and to die.
Oh, we're busy now, George.
You will address me as Colonel.
Who are you? Monica, meet George, our resident troublemaker.
Hello, Colonel.
How do, ma'am? George, Monica's a brand-new guest here at Spring Valley and she has a good attitude.
I look forward to making your acquaintance.
No, you don't.
As do I, ma'am.
I, uh, I bought a book for Ella.
It's the best book I ever read.
War and Peace.
Might I recommend the Bible? Not so big on war, but it's just full of peace.
(CHUCKLING) Oh, well, I wouldn't know about that, ma'am.
I'm an Army man.
Yeah, I spent my life fighting in the forgotten country.
The Second World War up to George, spare us the Battle of the Bulge.
We've gotta get Monica unpacked.
I'll just leave this for Ella on her bed.
Uh, where's, uh, Ella? She's not with us anymore, George.
But, but She was a real trooper.
(WOMAN CHATTERING ON P.
A.
SYSTEM) (TV CHATTERING) (GUN FIRING ON TV) (SNEEZING) Statistics show that the presence of animals gives people hope.
(SNEEZING) Unless they're allergic.
God bless you.
That's the whole theory of animal therapy.
Did you know that people who keep pets actually live longer than people who live all alone? I'm sorry, but I hope you won't mind my being blunt.
Oh, I'm a big fan of blunt.
Here at Spring Valley we try to give our seniors a quiet, peaceful environment.
Nothing that would excite them too much, nothing that would get in the way of Dying.
My, my, we are blunt.
Mrs.
Hancock, I couldn't help but notice that it's visitors' day and there's nobody visiting.
No one to show these good, fine people that they're loved, cherished and remembered.
And you think that a few animals are gonna do the trick? Well, it sure worked for Noah.
It's nice to have a little extra help in the kitchen.
Colonel, you okay? You hear about Ella? Yes, and I happen to know that she died in her sleep, peacefully.
Peacefully? GEORGE: You know, when a person dies someone ought to have the decency to play Taps, for heaven's sake.
You miss the Army, don't you? No, no, I miss being useful.
I miss serving my country.
Got nothing left for me to serve, except cheese and crackers.
There you go, Edgar.
(YELPING) I had a puppy once, long time ago.
(CAT MEOWING) She wouldn't bark, so, uh, we named her Cal, after "Silent" Calvin Coolidge.
He was the President, you know.
Yes, I do, and it certainly is good to see you smiling, Edgar.
How you doin' there, Mildred? Oh, Tess, he's such a cute little bunny rabbit.
He reminds me of something.
Of what? I I can't remember.
Oh, don't worry about it.
It'll come back to you.
Don't be so hard on yourself.
Okay, everybody, it's time for some refreshments.
Hey, Tess.
I want you to meet the Colonel.
Oh, how do you do? Nice to meet you, nice to meet you.
And how 'bout meeting the sweetest dog this side of heaven? I've seen sweeter.
You know, General George Patton gave me a dog.
Yeah, I called him Ike just to get his goat.
(BOTH LAUGHING) (WOMAN CHATTERING ON P.
A.
SYSTEM) ANDREW: Hello.
You must be new here.
My name's Andrew, and I think you look very, very nice today.
(DOG BARKING) What's your name? Andrew, it's me.
Monica? Wh-what, what happened to you? Oh, nothing.
I'm the same angel I always was, just a, a few more wrinkles and a few more aches and pains.
Oh.
Whoa.
Andrew, allow me there.
Here, I got the girl.
Here, take, take the dog.
Oh, Okay.
And I got the little lady.
Now, you all right? Thank you.
All right? Thank you.
Huh? Yes.
(SIGHING) Okay.
You got a bit faint there, eh? Yes.
Thank you.
You're all right? Colonel, you're a perfect gentleman.
(LAUGHING) Oh, I'm just doin' my duty, ma'am.
Monica.
Monica, Monica, that's it.
Monica.
Over here.
This this is where I come to sit to think about the good old days.
Oh, well, why can't these be the good old days? Oh, those days ended for me a long, a long time ago.
Well, why? Life has a lot to offer.
Oh? You have a lot to offer.
Yeah, well, I I used to believe that, ah, but, you you know, it it used to be that when someone died the world showed a little respect.
You're talkin' about Ella now, aren't you, Colonel? Ah, yeah.
She was a good woman.
A wonderful girl, wonderful.
Treated everybody as if they were somebody, just like you.
Do you think you could call me George and drop Colonel? (GIGGLES) George, of course.
(LAUGHS) I like that.
It's wonderful to have somebody who understands what you're sayin'.
Are you gonna drink that coffee? You know, George, I never thought I'd hear myself say this, but I can't drink coffee anymore.
It doesn't agree with me.
Ah, tummy problems, huh? And eyes, and knees.
The whole kit and caboodle.
(LAUGHING) I know.
I've been there.
I had 'em all.
Makes you feel like you just want to give it all up and quit, don't it? Oh, no, not at all.
A good soldier never surrenders.
Don't give up, George.
You keep fighting the good fight.
So you're an admirer of Old Blood and Guts Patton, are you? So am I, and you're right, you're right.
It's time.
Time to sound the charge.
You're a good soldier, Miss Monica, and I salute you.
(BOTH LAUGHING) (WOMAN CHATTERING ON P.
A.
SYSTEM) (PHONE RINGING) STEPHANIE: Bread, tomatoes, milk.
Okay, so that seems pretty good.
Now how we doin' on butter and eggs? Um, I'll go to the store this afternoon.
George? (GASPS) Monica, oh, never sneak up on a soldier like that.
Where are you goin'? Well, thanks to you, I'm finally taking action.
Action? Wh-What kind of action? (ALARM BLARING) Oh.
George.
No time to surrender now.
Oh, Lord, give me strength.
(MUTTERING) George? What are you doin'? What do you think I'm doin'? Lowering the flag to half mast for Ella.
Well, can I give you a hand? Now, now, what would a ponytailed hippie like you know about how to treat the flag, huh? George, I have folded a lot of flags in my career.
STEPHANIE: George! George, what do you think you're doing? STEPHANIE: Answer me.
(SIGHING) All right, George, this is the final straw.
You're out, and I mean today.
Mrs.
Hancock, please, ma'am, with all due respect, don't you think that's a little harsh? Would you like to join him? Colonel, um, is there anyone I can call? Any any family? Never had any family.
Only family I ever had was my Uncle Sam's Army, and I guess that tour of duty is over.
(PHONE RINGING) MONICA: You can't throw George out.
Where would he go? STEPHANIE: He can go to the Veteran's Hospital.
He was honoring a friend.
Look, this is not the first time.
The man has been nothing but trouble since the day he got here, and I'm responsible for the welfare of all our residents, not just one.
Then I'll be responsible for this one.
You? You'll take care of him? Yes.
Why do you care about him? What makes you such a good Samaritan? Because I know that underneath all that bluster there's a good man.
STEPHANIE: No offense, Monica.
He's a senile old man whose dull old war stories don't even make sense anymore.
You don't have to defend me, ma'am.
This senile old, dull man can defend himself, thank you.
Even from a sniper.
(DOOR CLOSING) Oh, boy.
What's that one for? Oh, um, valor.
Valor.
What a wonderful word.
Not heard very much anymore.
It's like that other word, uh, "honor.
" That's one of my favorites.
Yes, yes, mine, too, but people don't care very much for that word "honor," today.
I mean, they care for fame, they care for money, but honor I care.
That's why I defended you.
Could could you get that picture up on top of the bureau, please? Thank you.
(SNIFFLING) Well, there's not much honor in just gettin' old.
There used to be.
Yes, there used to be.
Yeah, when I was a little snot-nosed brat, we were taught to honor and to respect our elders.
Me, too.
You know, when we were little kids, do you remember how much fun it used to be just to jump on the swing? (LAUGHS) Feels like yesterday.
Yeah, like yesterday.
Yeah, where where did the time go? A whisper, and a year has gone by.
But the darndest thing is I still feel like that little kid.
On the inside.
That's right, on the inside.
I feel like I could jump right on my bike and race down to Mr.
Johnson's candy store and blow my whole week's allowance.
So what's stoppin' us? Nothin'.
(GROANING) Just these old legs, I suppose.
Can they get you to a bus stop, huh? Tell you what.
Tomorrow we're gonna go to the botanical garden and smell the flowers, you and I.
But what about you leaving? What? Oh, oh, I'm goin' next year.
No, let me get rid of this.
I'll put it in my locker.
And don't you forget.
Tomorrow afternoon, 1400 hours.
It's a date.
That's 2:00 for you civilians.
Oh, Tess, isn't it wonderful? He needed joy and I'm helpin' him find it.
I feel so much closer to him now.
You just be careful how much closer you get.
ALL: ♫ Don't sit under the apple tree ♫ With anyone else but me ♫ Till I come marching home ♫ Hold it just a minute, hold it just a minute.
Stephanie, Stephanie, you know, this would sound so much better if we could get in that piano.
Oh, I think we sound about as good as we're going to, and, uh, that key has been lost for years.
Did you ever hear of a locksmith? That was real good.
That was really good.
Now I want you to remember tomorrow to bring your spoons, 'cause we're gonna do Babaloo.
(ALL CHEERING) WOMAN ON P.
A.
: Mr.
Hersh to medical records.
Mr.
Hersh to medical records.
Ta-dum.
Oh, George, I know you didn't get these in the botanical gardens.
Oh, what do I look like, a flower thief, huh? You look like a million bucks to me, honey.
I'm the new roomie, Lorraine.
Not like the quiche.
Not French.
Oh, no.
Straight out of Queens.
(BOTH LAUGHING) I'm Monica, roomie.
Oh, listen to that brogue.
Isn't it heavenly? Don't you just love it, sweetheart? Oh, and you, doll, where did you sprout from? Oh, I just jumped from army base to army base.
Oh, just like my husband, James.
He was killed in the war.
Oh, I'm sorry to hear that.
In Ardennes.
Well, we were so close to the finish line, but Yeah, um, would you Would you ladies pardon me? George, thank you for a lovely afternoon.
Oh, yes, it was my pleasure, but, yeah.
Your boyfriend is a doll.
Oh, he's, he's not my boyfriend.
Oh, the way he was looking at you, that ain't no What's that other, not romantic.
What's that other word? Oh, yeah, that word, that word What is it? Bubonic? Ah, I used to say it all the time.
Harry and I are just catatonic? Oh, Monica, you know, we're going to be here all day at this rate.
We'll miss bingo.
Come on, let's go.
I'll finish unpacking later.
You and me, sweetheart, we're going to be friends.
Platonic.
That's it.
We're platonic.
Oh, not if George has his way.
(LAUGHING) Oh.
Oh, I forgot my glasses.
You go ahead and I'll catch up with you.
I'll save you a spot next to George.
Now that's a woman with life.
Lorraine and George have so much in common.
I think she'll do him a lot of good.
She'll do him a heart attack.
That man has a lot of work to do before he's ready for a relationship, and he ain't never gonna be ready for you.
What do you mean? I've been tryin' to warn you.
You're heading for dangerous waters.
Oh, Tess.
Old George wants a different kind of joy than an angel is supposed to give.
Tess, he's 80 years old.
And you're over 80 centuries old, but it's not stopping him.
Wasn't that the plan? He's smiling and he's friendly and he hasn't caused trouble in days.
You think that's what this is about, to keep the man happy and out of trouble? That's the kind of plan humans make for older people, but that's not God's plan.
George still has a difference to make in this world, and he cannot do that if he thinks he's got a date with an angel.
You think that he's really interested in me? Bingo.
(SWING MUSIC PLAYING) G-5-6.
Bingo.
(LAUGHING) Oh, I always knew you were winner.
Oh, I love this game, George.
It really concentrates the mind.
(LAUGHING) Yes.
Yes, I'm concentrating, too.
Call out your numbers, baby.
We have a very special treat.
I found out that we have a musician in our midst.
(ALL APPLAUDING) And I have the key to the piano.
(ALL CHEERING) (PLAYING MOONLIGHT SERENADE) Come on, people.
Don't you know dance music when you hear it? TESS: Come on, come on.
Don't you try to sneak past me.
You were right, Tess.
I I think George has a wee crush on me.
It doesn't seem like a wee crush to me, and it's not a wee crush to George.
You've got a lot to learn about the human heart, Miss Wings, and lesson number one is it's breakable.
Now you've got to stop this right now, before all kinds of things get broken, including your halo.
Would you care to dance? Not too close.
I've never been happier than now, with you here in my arms.
George, it shouldn't be like this.
Oh, but it is.
Have you ever been in love? George, I have somethin' I need to tell you.
Well, uh, do do you need to sit down? No, I need to Oh, oh, my dear, what? Oh, oh, my dear.
Are you all right, baby? Here, sit down.
Sit down.
What is going on in here? And who unlocked that piano? Oh, my God.
Monica, are you all right? I'm all right.
Oh, I'll call a doctor.
No, no, I I just got a bit winded.
I'm okay.
All right.
I want to see you in my office immediately.
It's all right, baby.
Take care of our little angel, will you? Of course.
I'll, I'll take her back to her room.
Come on.
There we go.
You know, Colonel, I think that I can take it from here.
Bye, George.
I'll be all right.
Are you sure? Yes, yes, I'll be okay.
Well, I'll, uh, I'll check in later.
Ah, be lovely.
(GROANS) Andrew, oh, these human forms are full of surprises.
What happened to you out there? I don't know.
I was on the dance floor, and my heart, it hurt.
I I was feelin' so badly about George.
I know.
I know, and everybody can see how he feels about you.
Oh, Andrew, when he knocks on my door he he brings more than just flowers.
He brings me his hopes and his dreams.
Expectations.
And I don't know what to do with him.
I had no idea it would hurt this much to break someone else's heart.
It feels so strange to be loved like this.
(SIGHING) Human love is very complicated.
And God's love is very simple.
I don't think Monica's going to be with us very long.
Maybe you're right.
Whatever made you think those people could handle all that activity? You make these people feel that their lives are about as real as that plastic plant.
Water them.
Let them have some life.
Music never hurt anyone, did it, Mrs.
Hancock? Give me that key.
(WOMAN CHATTERING ON P.
A.
SYSTEM) You are making a big mistake.
I'm sorry to make you worry.
Oh, what, me, worry? I gave that up a long time ago.
Back when my James was in the Army, I used to worry about him every day.
I worried, would he come home? And then, the telegram arrived.
Telegram? "Missing in action.
" I don't know how or why.
I only know what was on this little piece of paper.
"Missing in action.
" And a big piece of my heart's been missing ever since, but we have to carry on, don't we? (CRICKETS CHIRPING) TESS: You can lock up that piano, but you can't lock up all the feelings you've been hiding all your life.
No one can.
I don't know what you're talking about.
Oh, yes, you do.
There are a lot of changes going on in this place.
Don't you think it's time to make some of your own? Monica? I'm I'm not disturbing you, am I? No, George.
I've been waiting for you.
Oh, you have? Really? Yes.
Ah, well, I I know what it's like to be, um, restricted to quarters.
George, there's something I need to tell you.
Of course, I haven't been restricted to quarters since the Battle of the Bulge.
That was George, I have something to tell you.
I am an angel sent from God.
Oh, I know you're an angel.
Listen, before you came to this place I No, George.
It's time that we told the truth about ourselves.
The truth? Oh, no, no.
No, Lorraine was right.
I should let you get some rest.
Oh, I love you, girl.
MONICA: George? George.
Oh, no.
No.
MONICA: George, don't be afraid.
I really am an angel.
Oh, I believe you're an angel.
Oh, yeah.
Yeah, uh, in the In the war, guys would, kept telling me about all the angels they saw and I, I I I never did.
I was always hoping that maybe I could meet one of my own.
Well, you have now.
Yeah, but why did it have to be you? I love you, you know.
I guess there's not much future in bein' in love with an angel, is there? Yeah, well, I must've been nuts thinkin' anybody could fall in love with a guy like me.
Why? What kind of a guy are you? I'm, uh, pretty worthless.
I don't think so.
Neither does God.
You're the girl who sat on this bench with me th-that other day.
Yes, I am.
I was supposed to bring you joy.
Oh, you did, you did.
Not that day.
I had to understand you first, but I have found so much joy in understanding what it feels like to be old.
Joy bein' old? Yes, joy.
The joy from knowledge that comes with age.
The people in your rest home, George, should look back with pride.
Yours is the generation that fought the good fight.
Oh, yeah.
You were the winners, and the only losers are are the young people who don't take advantage of the golden wisdom that lives there.
You have so much to share.
Things that people need to know.
Things that you've been afraid to share.
You know You You know about me.
You know the truth of my life, don't you? Yes, I do, George, and so does God, but he loves you, and he wants you to share what you've been hiding for years.
Well, what difference can that make after all this time? All the difference in the world.
Fight this one last battle, George, because you can't truly live until you live in truth.
I'm a tired old man.
You have more strength inside you than you can possibly imagine.
You see, there is peace that you fight for with guns.
Yeah.
And there is peace that you fight for with your soul, and if you face the truth and fight the fight, then you will have a victory that may be called triumphant, and you will have peace that may be called lasting.
STEPHANIE: Everybody's here except Monica.
That's all right, George.
Go right ahead.
What's all this about? It's about unlocking things.
Just hold on.
You'll see.
Well, I'm I'm glad that you all could come today.
I I have something to tell you, uh, that I want everyone to know.
Uh, I'm here (GEORGE CLEARING THROAT) I'm here to tell you the truth.
I'm not a colonel.
Never have been.
I'm not a hero.
Never was.
I'm a phony.
I've been lying and lying and lying, right down to my jacket and my medals which I bought in a, uh, thrift store.
You weren't in the Army? Oh, no, no, I served, but never in the front lines.
Never, never there.
I was in the Mess.
Well, to you civilians that means.
I was the cook.
Why did you lie, Colonel? George? Well, you know, after the war, with civilians, I mean, who cares about the cook? See, I didn't I didn't think what I did mattered, and till Until somebody told me that telling the truth mattered, even after all this time.
Well, I I I don't suppose this It matters to any of you here, but, uh, by golly, it sure is a a weight off my chest.
Yeah! Thank you for listening.
So who did you serve with? Patton's Third Army, Sixth Armored Division.
Oh, George, hold up, please.
Don't leave.
Oh, could you just wait a minute, sweetheart? Darling, w-would you run to my room? There's a little wooden box on my side table.
Would you bring it to me, please? Yeah, of course.
I believe you're lookin' for this.
Yeah.
It's, uh, it's going well.
Are you coming? You go ahead.
I'll I'll be right in.
You said you were in the Sixth Armored.
My James was in the Sixth Armored.
I want to show you something.
This is from him.
Would you read it out loud, sweetheart? Yes.
"Dear, Rainbow.
" That's what he called me.
He always said after a storm when the "It's cold and wet and we just marched three days" "to get somewhere colder and wetter than where we started.
" (ALL LAUGHING) "There's been just one good thing happening around here.
" "Our cook made pot" "Our cook made pot roast.
I don't know how he did it, "but, uh, that pot roast was just like you, "the ones you made me on Sunday nights.
"I took one bite and for half a second "I felt like I was at home again.
" "Home with you.
" "Home in our little dining room on Wilson Street," "looking at each other across your mother's table.
" "I love you.
" "Jimmy.
" You should know that, George.
In the middle of all that hell you gave my baby one moment of joy.
Maybe his last.
Well, anyway, this is the last letter that I got from my Jimmy.
My James McCully.
Was he ever called "Flat Top" Jimmy? You knew him? Yeah, I knew him.
I was there when Then you know what happened to him? It was just before dawn.
We never saw them coming.
It was as if the clouds burst and rained on us, but it wasn't rain.
It was bullets and lead and gunfire.
Men were running everywhere.
I stepped out of the, uh, mess tent and I saw Jimmy across the way in the hospital tent, he'd just stepped outside and he didn't know which way to run, right or left, and at that very moment a grenade landed at his feet.
He looked down and saw it and stared at it.
I yelled, "Run, Jimmy, run!" He must've realized then that there were wounded men just behind him in the tent, because he made a choice.
He fell full weight on top of that grenade, and an instant later, it exploded.
He saved many, many lives, including mine, by that very brave action.
Thank you, George.
You're an angel.
Without you I never would've known.
You've lifted such a great weight from me.
Now I have peace.
That's, uh, what angels bring, peace.
Colonel or no colonel, you're my hero.
(BOTH LAUGHING) Ah, no (PLAYING OF STRANGE LANDS AND PEOPLE) Isn't that beautiful? (SIGHING) Yes, it is.
It's been a great day for truth telling.
Don't you have something you want to say? How do you know all this? Well, with age comes wisdom, and I've been around a long time, and so have these wonderful people who look to you to give them your very best.
Why don't you do that, baby? They have so much to give back to you, if you'll just give 'em a chance.
Go on.
You remind me of my old piano teacher, Mrs.
Cadegan.
I'll take that as a compliment.
I had no right to take this pleasure away from you just because someone took it away from me.
I've always resented people who could play the piano because I loved playing it so much, but I wasn't very good, and my father refused to waste any more of his hard earned money on lessons.
He said it wasn't worth it.
(CRYING) He said I wasn't worth it.
And you believed that? I guess I did.
Oh, sweetheart, let me see your hands.
Why? They're beautiful hands, and beautiful hands mean a beautiful heart, and beautiful hearts make beautiful music.
(PLAYING MY BONNIE LIES OVER THE OCEAN) It's 325 for 30 minutes.
No, 20 at 400.
I read the cookbook.
I should know.
I lived that book, son.
I think I can trust my own judgment.
Don't look at me, angel boy.
Yeah.
You know, I I believe that Monica is an angel, and, as obviously, you are, too, Tess, but as for you, Andrew.
The way you cook, I'd never believe you're an angel.
Well, in Andrew's defence, let me say this is not his regular gig.
Oh? Well, what's that mean? I'm the Angel of Death.
Oh, yeah, sure.
I can believe that.
I mean, you really know how to kill a stew.
(ANDREW LAUGHING) So, is this farewell? Yes.
We have a new assignment, just like you.
All of you? Yes.
But there is someone waiting to say goodbye to you on a park bench.
Oh? Andrew said I'd find you here if I wanted to Say goodbye.
I can't even say the word.
Don't worry, George.
I'll be seeing you.
In the meantime, don't let that heart you've discovered go to waste.
Oh, no, I won't.
I'm I'm fine.
When Lorraine returns to her room she'll have discovered that I'm gone.
I left a note for her.
May I share with you what it says? Oh, please do.
Yes.
"Dear Lorraine.
I don't have much time left.
"But do not mourn for me, "for I have gone to a better place.
"A place where there is no sorrow and no parting.
"A place where all of our questions are finally answered.
"Please, can you do me one small favour?" "Can you share that precious gift" "you've always had for living with George.
" "For I knew him not long," "but I loved him well.
"