DCI Banks Aftermath Episode Scripts

N/A - What Will Survive (Part 2)

It looks like a fox dug her up.
Traces of soil were found in her lungs.
Somewhere between these blows, they tried to bury her.
While she was still alive? ~ (FIRECRACKER EXPLOSIONS) ~ Hey, hey, hey, hey! I might want people like her out of the country.
I don't want 'em dead.
Katrin Vesik filed a Missing Persons report on her sister Annika.
Never seen her before.
She was one of your son's prostitutes.
Go away! Leave us alone! ~ Do you know where she is? ~ I wish I did.
She owes me money.
~ What about her? ~ That's Annika's sister Katrin.
~ How well did you know her, Robbie? ~ She were my best friend.
~ Where was he Tuesday night? ~ We were both here.
All night.
I never even got to say goodbye.
Neighbours reported seeing the flames around midnight.
They managed to get Michael Osgood out before the whole place went up.
~ Robbie? ~ Never stood a chance.
How soon before I get to speak to Michael? He's pretty bad.
They said they'd call the minute he wakes up.
It was arson.
Preliminary investigations revealed traces of accelerant at the scene, specifically white spirit on the floor of the hall and the inside of the front door and the remains of fireworks used to ignite it.
So this is what - a prank that went wrong? That's one possibility.
But Michael Osgood was also due to bring his son Robbie in here for an interview this morning.
Maybe someone didn't want them to share what they knew.
I'm going to want the ex-wife's address.
We're looking at two avenues.
One, we look at Michael and Robbie Osgood in connection with Katrin Vesik's murder.
We find out all we can about them.
Michael Osgood did time.
So, known associates, anything And, two, we treat them both as separate for now, which means we get those kids who tormented the Osgoods in here.
And we put the fear of God in them.
That's all, everyone.
Thanks.
Ken, I just want to go through this.
~ Anything on Annika Vesik? ~ Not yet.
OK.
If she's out there, we'll find her.
She's over there.
(VEHICLE BEEPS) Thanks.
I knew something like this would happen.
The fire? Summat bad.
Because of the bullying? Because when you get sucked into Jason McCready's world, shit always happens.
May I ask why you left Michael? Cos nothing ever changed.
When we first got together, Jason was throwing Michael scraps of work.
He just wanted to keep his head above water .
.
especially when Robbie came along.
He did time for handling stolen goods.
Doing someone a favour.
That's what he does.
Favours.
When he got out, Michael promised me it'd be different.
That we'd move away, start again.
But Jason was still there.
I couldn't take it.
Not any more.
Did Michael ever talk about someone called Annika? ~ No.
~ What about Katrin? Who are they? Jason's tarts? Michael said he was helping Katrin.
Sounds about right.
He was always a sucker for a sob story.
He's a nice guy.
That's why I married him.
He were lovely, Michael.
Always polite.
Always took really good care of his kid.
~ Then they do this.
~ Why do think it was deliberate? I don't I've no idea.
The kids that bullied Michael and Robbie, do they live round here? I just need a name.
A young man was killed in that house.
That's murder.
Gary.
Gary McCready.
Gary McCready? Ow! Ohh! (GROANS) ~ In you go.
~ Mrs McCready? ~ What are you doing here? ~ Just looking out for my grandson.
Get in.
~ He's Jason McCready's son? ~ Nephew.
~ Keep me posted.
~ Will do.
~ Shellfish? ~ Yes.
I apprehended the suspect, applying reasonable force and by taking advantage of the circumstances at the time.
~ Using a bag of cockles? ~ Yes.
~ Where's Annie? ~ She got a foot in the face.
~ Is she OK? ~ The hospital are checking for concussion.
She'll be fine.
I'm going over there anyway, get an update on Michael Osgood.
Right.
He's told you, he didn't start any fire.
~ What about the car? ~ What car? Someone torched Michael Osgood's estate car.
~ He didn't do that either.
~ I'm asking HIM.
~ It wasn't me.
~ There you go.
This is a statement made by the owner of a hardware store ~ half a mile from your home.
~ So? He says he sold Gary three litres of white spirit three days ago.
Yeah.
I use it to clean my paintbrushes.
~ Really? ~ It's not illegal to buy white spirit.
No, but you can start a hell of a fire with it.
Is that all you've got? Bloke in an overall and a bit of guesswork.
Mrs McCready, you're in this room as the appropriate adult.
Unless my questions are confusing, repetitive or oppressive And they're not, are they? No.
I didn't think so.
.
.
you don't get to interrupt, you don't offer legal advice and you let me conduct this interview as I see fit.
All right? ~ So where is it? ~ Where's what? ~ The white spirit you bought.
~ It's gone.
You must have a lot of brushes.
Maybe it was that retard did it.
He's thick as shit.
You ever think of that? OK, Gary.
This is what's going to happen.
We're going to lock you up in a cell while we continue to gather evidence.
Because I think you started that fire that killed Robbie Osgood.
Manslaughter, Gary, at the very least.
Although between you and me, I'll be pressing for murder.
Aw, don't be sad.
Yeah, I'll call you later.
OK.
All right.
All right, bye, then.
Bye.
~ You're smoking.
~ You're not so bad yourself.
~ You OK? ~ Cheers.
All his life Robbie's had to put up with that sort of crap.
They single you out, and the pack just Let's get the rest of Gary's little posse in here, see if we can rattle a few cages.
Pretty weird, though.
Torching the house of someone who works for your uncle.
Not if Uncle Jason told him to do it.
Let's get him to cough to the fire first.
Then we'll see.
(BEEPING) (SIGHS) David Any news? They're looking at her now.
~ Dress-down Friday, is it? ~ Training in my lunch hour.
Ironman triathlon in three months.
Ironman? Regular triathlon not hard enough for you, eh? ~ Do you run? ~ Run? Me? No.
I just jump to conclusions.
(DOOR OPENS) ~ You OK? ~ Totally.
You had me worried.
Alan, you didn't need to come.
No, no, I'm actually here to see Michael Osgood.
No, I wasn't I just thought I'd pop down and see that you're OK.
~ And I am OK, that is.
~ Good.
I will see you tomorrow.
~ Nice of him.
~ Yeah, wasn't it? (COINS CLINK) (COIN DROPS IN TELEPHONE SLOT) (TAPS KEYPAD) (RINGING TONE) Hello? Hello, it's me.
It's Annika.
You have to help me.
Please Come and get me.
I I don't know who else! Ryan Cookson, he's in your gang, isn't he? ~ Maybe.
~ Yeah, we've been talking to him.
He lasted about a whole five minutes before dropping you right in it.
Told us all about the fireworks you put through Michael Osgood's letterbox last night.
White spirit AND fireworks.
Traces of both were found by the fire investigators.
Let me make it easy for you.
You wanted to give them a scare, so you poured white spirit through their letterbox.
~ No.
~ Then you set off the fireworks.
Maybe you didn't expect it to burn as fast as it.
~ That didn't happen.
~ Eyewitness statements, physical evidence, a history of attacks.
I think we've got enough, don't you? Hey Yeah, we did the fireworks, yeah.
But that was earlier, around teatime.
Just a few fireworks.
~ What about the white spirit? ~ I didn't put it in the letterbox.
~ I used it on his car.
~ And this was when? Tuesday evening.
We waited till Robbie got back and they'd gone to sleep, and then we burned the car.
~ So Robbie was out on Tuesday night? ~ Yeah.
What time did he get back? The offie opposite had just closed.
So about 11.
All right.
Michael Osgood was home the night Katrin died.
The pizza delivery and now Gary McCready give him an alibi.
But Robbie wasn't there.
His father lied about that.
~ Why? ~ You mean apart from the obvious? You know that hair they recovered from Katrin's body Get on to the lab.
See how hard it is to get DNA from a burnt corpse.
On the night that Katrin died, you told us that Robbie was at home with you.
I've just had a phone call from my colleague.
We now have a witness who says that they saw him return home in YOUR car around 11pm.
Do you want to tell me why those two accounts are so different? (MONITOR BEEPS) I didn't I didn't want you to think .
.
that he'd had anything to do with what happened to her.
So where had he been? Just driving.
He likes to drive.
He likes the rules.
What you can and can't do.
A place for everything.
Order.
He shouldn't have died alone.
Not like that.
(SOBS) Not without me.
My son (SOBS) My son.
(MOBILE RINGS) Yes.
Ken, what is it? About 40 minutes.
Why? What? They were looking for a murder weapon.
One of them noticed the ground had been disturbed.
Nothing in the pockets, nothing nearby.
No ID.
Just like before.
White male.
No distinguishing features and, as yet, no known cause of death.
From the rate of decay, their best guess is he was buried about three months ago.
OK.
So that's where we start with the MISPERS reports.
Think he was put there by the same person that killed Katrin Vesik? I'd say there was a good chance.
Any more bodies out here? Mid-50s I'd say.
Malnourished.
His hair and nails show signs of vitamin deficiency - longitudinal ridging, that sort of thing.
So I wouldn't set too much store by his diet.
He didn't take very good care of himself at all.
He had an impacted molar which should have been seen to and wasn't.
Must've hurt like hell.
Any distinguishing features? No nice tattoos, I'm afraid.
Unfortunately, with this one, we're past the point of getting useable prints.
~ Cause of death? ~ That's the interesting bit.
There's no sign of trauma, no entry or exit wounds, no ligature marks.
But I did find signs of coronary thrombosis.
~ He died of a heart attack? ~ I'd say so.
Why bury someone who'd died of natural causes? ~ Oh, you needn't do that.
~ I know.
I haven't lost the use of my legs, you know I'm quite capable of going down the shops.
Except you haven't, have you? You look like you've been living off cheese and crackers.
So? I don't need help or charity.
It's a bit Wallace and Gromit, isn't it? Don't you condescend me.
I wasn't.
~ You're loving this, aren't you? ~ Dad, please.
All because we were closer to Roy than you.
And whose fault was that? At least your brother made the effort.
YOU, you just pissed off.
Joined the police.
Roy's gone, Dad, just like Mum.
It's just you and me now.
We're all that we've got left.
Sentimental crap.
You never came here when your mother was alive.
So why bother now? ~ I want you to leave.
~ I'm sorry.
Now! Morning.
How's the walking wounded? Stumbling but upright.
Nice of him to give you a lift.
Tandem got a puncture, has it? No, he insisted.
Obviously I'm not capable of catching the bus.
Obviously! You probably shouldn't have come to the hospital yesterday.
I was in the building.
I was just giving a bit of moral support.
~ I was fine.
~ OK.
But thanks.
For bothering.
Annie, I was wondering You see, tomorrow's Mum's funeral, and I just ~ It wouldn't be for very long.
~ You want me to come? Well, I could probably do with the moral support myself.
I can't.
~ I'm sorry.
~ Boss Duty sergeant just called up.
Uniforms picked up Shane Harris an hour ago.
~ Fighting migrants again? ~ Dealing smack.
He wants to see you.
This girl Annika you're looking for.
Maybe I can help you wi' that.
Fancy a bit of bargaining, do you? You were caught with a pocketful of baggies - possession with intent to supply.
You think you've got some wiggle room? ~ She called me.
~ Annika? Yesterday.
~ Why would she call you? ~ I'm her dealer.
~ What did she say? ~ She wanted me to come and get her.
~ Where was she? ~ She didn't say.
She sort of cried out.
There was some scuffling noise and then nothing.
Come on, that's got to be worth something, hasn't it? So, according to Shane Harris's phone records, he received a call from here yesterday.
Where's she been? What's she been doing? (SHUTTER WHIRS) Looks like there's been a fight.
So, if someone took her from here, they can only have gone in one of two directions.
Let's find the CCTV cameras - public, private, I don't care.
I want to know who was on this road yesterday and where they went.
OK, thanks.
Initial forensics on the body are back.
Soil samples from his boots match the ones taken from Katrin Vesik's shoes, which we know don't match where they were buried.
~ So they were both recently in the same location.
~ Yeah.
I think we've got something.
We think Annika Vesik was taken yesterday from a phone box on the Heston Road.
There's no CCTV on this stretch of road.
But half a mile east of the phone box, there's a private security camera installed on a pub being renovated and a mile to the west there's another camera on a farm.
So we've got a mile-and-a-half stretch with no turnings or side roads.
Cars go by THIS camera and, a few minutes later, there they are, passing by here, both directions, as you'd expect.
Except this one.
It passes the farm, but at the pub - nothing.
Instead, eight minutes later, it goes back past the farm the way it came.
~ So it turned round.
~ At exactly the same time Annika was making her call to Shane Harris.
~ The Sierra - have you got a number? ~ Only a partial.
The plate's obscured by mud.
Just spoken to the DVLA.
We've got a match with 14 Sierras in the Greater Yorkshire area, and one of them belongs to Jason McCready.
(DOG BARKS) ~ (DOG BARKS) ~ You again? ~ What do you want? ~ Where's Annika Vesik? ~ I've no idea.
~ You've got no idea? ~ No idea.
~ All right ~ You can't just go where you like! Yeah? This warrant says that I can.
Mr McCready, I think we need to have a chat.
(DOG BARKS) Check round the corner, Annie.
(DOG BARKS) ~ Annika! ~ So what have you done with Annika? You took her from that phone box, didn't you? ~ We know you were there.
~ We've got you on CCTV, ~ heading towards the phone box, then coming back a few minutes later.
~ So? I forgot my phone.
I turned round, go back and get it.
~ So you don't deny it was you? ~ Why would I? So you just happened to be on the exact same road at the exact same time Annika was snatched.
It's a bit of a coincidence, isn't it? ~ Jason! ~ Mr McCready, if you'd like to stay here with us, thank you.
Looks deserted.
It does, doesn't it? So why the new padlock? Annie, hold that for me.
Thanks.
(DROPS CROWBAR) (MOANING AND SOBBING) Dear Christ! Police.
Don't be scared.
It's all right.
(MURMURS) Does anyone here speak English? (PLAINTIVE MUTTERING) I'm looking for Annika.
(TERRIFIED VOICES) (WAILS) It's OK.
Don't be scared.
It's all right.
Police.
It's OK.
It's all right.
It's all right.
We're not going to hurt you.
It's OK.
~ Can anyone here speak English? ~ Calm down.
(SOBBING) Does anyone know Annika Vesik? ~ Anyone? ~ I'm Annika.
Jason McCready, I'm arresting you for offences related to forced labour and for the kidnapping and false imprisonment of Annika Vesik.
You do not have to say anything, but it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court.
Anything you do say may be given in evidence.
Mind how you go.
He had them working here, the meat-processing plant, all over.
Said if they complained, he'd take them out to the woods and they wouldn't come back.
~ Did you talk to Annika? ~ Katrin found her.
Nearly got her out.
Annika said they heard shouting.
Katrin ran off.
After that, nothing.
When I first arrived, Jason gave me the job in the salon.
But I needed money.
He said there was a way.
~ To be a prostitute? ~ Yes.
I didn't want to.
But I had no choice.
The drugs The men complained.
~ Said I was no good.
~ So he got rid of you? But I needed the money.
~ I got angry.
~ What did you do? Shouted at him.
Yelled in the street.
He made me work at the farm instead.
Living in that shit hole.
I prayed for help.
For it to end.
And then Katrin (SOBS) It's all my fault.
(SOBS) (SPEAKS ESTONIAN) Thank you.
Katrin Vesik was looking for her sister ~ and found out about the slaves, didn't she? ~ No comment.
That's why she was killed, wasn't it? ~ To shut her up.
~ No comment.
Do you know what the Coroners and Justice Act is? He does.
It makes forced labour a criminal offence.
It's what's going to bring you down, Maureen.
How's your blood pressure now? I had no knowledge of the day-to-day running of the business.
There is no proof I had any involvement in the decision to hire these workers, no evidence of any sort.
I am innocent of all charges.
So just hang your own kid out to dry.
Is that how it works with you? (DOOR SHUTS) For the benefit of the recording, DCI Banks has just entered the room.
Your mum's just abandoned you, Jason.
She's denying everything.
She's letting you carry this one all by yourself.
~ No, she wouldn't.
~ She just did.
So tell us about the man who died of a heart attack.
Who was he? Was he one of your slaves? Cos we know he was at the farm.
We matched the soil found on his boots.
Keels over, dead.
Which is a problem cos now you've got a body to get rid of.
You can't just dump him anywhere.
Too risky.
So you bury him, like he didn't exist, except he did.
He was real.
You just threw him away like he was rubbish.
You do the same thing with Katrin? We know that she was at the farm too.
She came to rescue Annika.
You couldn't very well let that happen, could you? You could save everyone time, Jason.
Costly trial.
It would certainly be taken into consideration.
Just tell us what you did.
Katrin Vesik knew everything, didn't she? So you had to stop her.
So you killed her and you buried her.
The same place that you'd dumped the other body.
It wasn't me.
Then who was it? Robbie Osgood.
Katrin had brought him ~ .
.
to drive 'em, I suppose.
~ But you caught them? At first I thought they were nicking equipment, so I chased them into one of t'barns.
She climbed up into t'loft and I followed up the stairs and then she just went She went for me.
She hit me with this iron bar.
And Robbie, he were shouting and crying.
So he ran up, just as she were going to hit me again.
And then Robbie pulled her away and they were on the edge of t'loft and she kind of lost her footing and fell and hit the floor.
Blood everywhere and she weren't breathing.
So, Robbie, he just went mental, apologising over and over.
'I'm sorry.
I'm sorry.
' Poor kid were terrified.
So I told him to calm down, that we could sort this, but she needed to be moved.
So I told him where to take her.
So, yeah, I saw her die.
But I didn't kill her.
Robbie did.
We've got a match with the hair found on Katrin's body.
Robbie Osgood's? So that makes the fire what? (SIGHS) If Robbie killed Katrin and knew about the slaves, what if Jason didn't trust him to keep his mouth shut? And got his nephew to start the fire? Boss, you need to see this.
We've been digging around Gary McCready's gang.
Social networking sites, tweets, DMs, endless buddy stuff, photos, videos, you name it.
It's not just stuff they upload themselves.
There are also links to other posts.
One of Gary's friends 'liked' this from another group of kids on the estate.
Some kind of stupid drinking challenge.
A bunch of different recordings dotted around the internet - I've collected them all.
That's outside Michael Osgood's house.
The night of the fire.
I've gone through all the clips, putting them in time order.
That's the house there.
These were shot between 11 and 11:55, and none of these kids has approached the house.
Now watch.
See the flames through the door? That's the fire starting in the hallway.
There's no-one outside.
There's no kids near the door.
So Gary McCready was telling the truth.
And either Michael or Robbie Osgood burnt their own house down.
We know the fire was started inside the house.
The fireworks were thrown in earlier, weren't they? So who poured the white spirit? Who lit the fire, Michael? When Robbie came home that night, he was crying.
So scared.
He hadn't meant to.
But she was dead.
Did he say what happened to the body? He said Jason had known what to do.
He wasn't making much sense.
'My fault,' he kept saying.
'Sorry, Dad.
Sorry.
' I knew it'd only be a matter of time before you It only took a few questions before Robbie broke down the other day.
And that was at home.
How long would it take in a proper interview before he confessed? But even so with Robbie's problems He'd still be competent to stand trial.
He'd still do time.
He's so .
.
tender.
I mean, you've seen how them kids prey on him.
Prison I've been there.
I know.
I couldn't abandon him like that.
So it was just us.
A team.
Did everything together.
We'd do this together.
I made him his favourite tea.
Pasta parcels.
And I put a sleeping pill in his drink.
I lay beside him as he slept.
Told him he was special.
Everything was going to be OK .
.
and that he was loved.
Afterwards, when he was asleep .
.
I crept out of the room.
It only took a moment to start the fire.
And when I knew it had caught .
.
I went back to be with him.
I (SOBS) I wasn't meant to be rescued.
Are you sure about this? Do you really believe Robbie could take Katrin and when he saw she was still alive, while he was burying her, that he could then kill her in cold blood? ~ He panicked.
~ What about the physical evidence? The hair that Karin must have pulled out belonged to Robbie.
~ Doesn't make him the killer.
~ Changing your tune, aren't you? ~ Just keeping an open mind.
~ What about Michael's statement? Robbie doesn't have an alibi while Jason McCready can put him at the scene.
And if I was Jason and I'd killed Katrin, who better to blame than the one person who can't answer back? Everyone else gets their say except for Robbie.
Who speaks for him? Robbie Osgood could never have buried Katrin Vesik.
~ Why not? ~ Speed.
Robbie was obsessive compulsive and he was obsessed with safety.
His therapist said he checked his tyre pressures before and after every journey.
Sometimes he'd arrive at a destination and immediately have to retrace his steps to make sure he hadn't hit anyone.
And Michael Osgood said that Robbie never drove anywhere fast.
~ He'd never break the speed limit.
~ Even with a body to bury? ~ I think I'd make an exception.
~ Yes, but this is OCD.
Proper full-blown clinical obsession.
It's a real mental illness.
So he drove slowly.
So what? Right, here's the farm.
Here's where Katrin was buried.
We know the time she made the 999 call.
We know Robbie Osgood came home just after 11.
So between those two times, we're saying Katrin was injured, taken to where she was murdered and buried.
Now, that's a round trip of 43 miles in a maximum of 57 minutes.
But the speed limit was 30mph for 18 of those miles, 40 for a further 12 and 60 for just 13.
So even if she was hurt immediately after she made the call, even if we could give Robbie the maximum amount of time, it doesn't matter what route he took, Robbie could never have made the roundtrip in the time.
He wasn't capable of it.
He wouldn't break the speed limit.
~ It's a reach, Helen.
~ I don't think so.
What if I'm right? What if it was Jason? I want a proper look at his car.
We've been over every inch of your car .
.
and the carpet fibres in your boot exactly match the ones found on Katrin's clothes.
And we found traces of her blood in there too and a partial bloody footprint you left in the footwell on the driver's side.
It was you who took Katrin Vesik to that wasteland.
After all, you'd already used it once.
And it was you who murdered her.
No.
It was Robbie.
You knew that she was still alive after she fell.
But you convinced Robbie that he'd killed her.
And you made him believe he was guilty because it suited you.
The only problem was you had to finish the job away from him.
So you sent Robbie home and then you dumped Katrin in the boot of your car.
How's your story looking now? Katrin Vesik.
Annika Vesik.
Robbie Osgood.
Prostitutes, slaves.
Cheap, disposable lives.
That's what you think, isn't it? I've got a feeling you're about to learn just how cheap life can be.
Eulogy written? Pretty much.
But first I have to go and tell Michael Osgood that he's going to be charged with the unlawful killing of his own son.
I'm sorry.
Helen you did a good thing following your instincts about Robbie.
He was a good kid.
When Jason took Katrin out to bury her, she was still alive.
We found traces of soil in her lungs .
.
which means that it was Jason McCready who killed Katrin, not Robbie.
I didn't want you to go to prison, thinking that your son was guilty.
Robbie was innocent.
I'm sorry.
I wish this wasn't happening.
That we weren't all here today remembering Mum.
I know, though, she'd tell me, 'Don't make a fuss.
' Something that she taught me and my kid brother Roy - don't fuss.
My mum taught me lots of things.
Not just the obvious stuff about manners and respect She taught me about choices.
The choices we make define who we are.
They can be the right ones .
.
or the ones that leave us with nothing.
We can choose to ignore things however hard that might be.
And sometimes those choices can cost us more than we can ever afford.
But mostly Mum taught me .
.
that we can choose to make a difference.
Touch other lives.
Do good.
It doesn't always work, Mum.
But we can keep trying.
'What will survive of us is love.
' The Arundel Tomb - one of Mum's favourite poems.
I wonder if that's what Michael Osgood believes.
What about you? Is that what you think? It'd be nice to think so.
We should go to the crematorium, Dad.
What you said in there was a bit soft.
Your mother would have liked it.