ER s05e09 Episode Script

Good Luck, Ruth Johnson

Previously on ER: - Carter! - I dislocated my shoulder.
How can you improve our department? You'd benefit from an eight-bed observation unit.
She's impressive.
She might be our next Chief.
- Doctor, you gave him 50%.
- I've given him a lethal dose! - He's bradying down.
- Number 8 ET tube.
The cochlear implant is a miracle.
We'll see if your son's a candidate.
Don't feel the need to solicit medical advice for me.
I brought it up since I know Kotlowitz.
- Lf you'd rather I hadn't - Yeah.
I do.
One hundred bottles of beer On the wall One hundred bottles of beer Take one down Pass it around One hundred bottles - I've never heard one go so long.
- It's like forever.
He can't even count.
Never drops to 99, 98.
Just back to 100.
So you don't mind that he's loud and smells bad? Just that he can't sing? A hundred bottles of beer Take one down Sorry.
It's catchy.
Who's on? General Lee, but she's in a meeting.
Don't call her that to her face.
Our new Chief of Emergency? Would I do that? We need some Ativan to put him out of our misery.
Someone's asleep in the on-call room.
- Wake him up.
- I can't leave the desk.
- Then find somebody who can.
- We've got work to do.
Mark! - Time to get up.
- I'll be right there.
- Mark, let's go! It's 7:00! - I'm up.
I'm up.
I don't want to have to throw cold water on you.
Doug, is that you? Ninety-nine, you idiot! Two mgs of Ativan, this guy's out colder than the top of K2.
- Sorry we woke you.
- I'm not.
My shift's over in 10 minutes.
I would've slept through getting off.
Sweet dreams, Bottle Man.
- Hey.
You about ready? - Yeah, I'm about deaf.
It wasn't necessary.
But I do it to Carol every morning.
There's coffee on the stove, toast on the counter.
Thanks for hosting me an extra night.
We're gonna miss you, eventually.
Who would've thought asbestos would take so long to get out? Probably the asbestos guys.
But who's counting? Now, listen, it's just gonna be, you know, a few days.
Early next week or something.
- We have any half-and-half? - Top shelf, to the left.
What? He didn't mention anything about his date.
It's none of our business.
- You're not gonna ask? - No.
And neither are you.
Right? Hey, no.
Right? This boy is a real annoyance.
- He's a menace.
- He's a machine.
And with four more mgs of Ativan, he is officially Chicago in January.
I'm out of here.
Need anything more? Call somebody else.
Call someone else.
Carter! I am not your mother! Now, for the last time, get up! Why does she have to do that? You set the alarm, didn't you? Roxanne? Carter! Yeah, I'm up! Thank you! Date? It wasn't a date.
What are you talking about? - You went out with her.
- We had dinner.
She started two days ago.
I was just being nice.
- So it was like a mercy date? - Of course not.
It was like an introduction.
Orientation.
- Exactly.
Thank you, Carol.
- Date.
We didn't go to bed together.
I know, but I was up late helping Kerry with her portfolio.
I'm sorry.
I'd prefer you wake me up.
You want to get up to check the Nikkei? - Sorry.
My battery's dead.
- No, I am.
My car's dead.
We could hoof it to the EI.
What would you think of decreasing my position in Small Caps by 7% and putting it into Value? But you need to pull back your international equities.
I don't want emerging markets.
But you want bonds and an absolute return fund with a low correlation to the equity market.
I got a call.
You need help? - False alarm.
- We fixed him up.
Jerry helped too.
Oh, Jerry, the desk clerk.
I'm slowly getting everyone's name down.
It's great how you solve problems on your own.
- We do try.
- How are you? - Getting settled in? - Everyone's been really helpful.
Oh, by the way, good job on that drunk.
Mark.
Kerry.
Do you have a minute? - Sure.
- Of course.
- It feels like snow today, doesn't it? - Maybe.
- Mark, thanks again for dinner.
- You're welcome.
Just filling her in.
- Yeah, lay of the land thing? - Orientation.
- John, you have a minute? - Sure.
Don Anspaugh says it's the hospital's 100th anniversary.
There's some kind of big gala dinner Saturday night.
And a little publicity for Mrs.
Ruth Johnson born in this hospital - What's that have to do with the ER? - Nothing.
Except that Mrs.
Johnson and family are upstairs right now.
Some mix-up on the time.
The Trib's photographer can't come till this afternoon.
Dr.
Anspaugh would like a tour guide to occupy them.
- They should call Willard Scott.
- I suggested you.
- What? - Yep.
You're the guy.
Friendly, knowledgeable, know your way around.
I have a med student.
Lucy She's working with Dr.
Ross today.
I can't think of a better choice.
- I think my colleagues agree.
- Dr.
Greene, Radiology.
I'll be right there.
You could use a light day.
You're not up to speed with your shoulder yet, right? - I'll just finish this paperwork.
- Thanks.
I appreciate it.
Thanks.
She has a big wind-up then she nails it over the plate.
I can deal with that.
Jimmy's got an earache and Erlene has a funny-Iooking sore on her lip.
We'll check them out.
Lucy, start with Jimmy.
We've got an 8-year-old coming in.
Auto versus bicycle.
Lucy, you got this under control? - No problem.
- All right.
Get away! I don't like that! - You stop that now! - I won't hurt you.
I don't want her doing that.
Do you want me to hold him down? It's okay.
A nurse will come.
- Get off me, Mom! - Okay, we're ready for you.
- Stop it now! - Get off me! Wilson Geary, 8.
On his bike, hit by a car.
He was chasing us.
I didn't see the car.
It's okay, Wilson.
We're gonna take care of you.
Good vitals, no LOC, complains of belly pain, lots of road rash.
Possible fracture on the left hand.
Let's get that buckle.
On my count.
One, two, three.
I didn't see what happened to Andy.
I ran away.
He keeps talking about a guy chasing him.
BP, 120/72.
Pulse, 94.
We're gonna cut your clothes so we can see where you're hurt, all right? Cops are taking the driver's report.
They'll be in soon.
Thank you.
You remember what happened? I crossed the park, then there was a car in the street.
I know to look both ways, but I was escaping.
- From who? - This man was chasing me and Andy.
- Good breath sounds.
Trachea midline? - Pulse ox is 98.
- Does it hurt here? - No.
- How about here? - That hurts a lot! Right upper quadrant tenderness with guarding.
- Get an abdominal CT with contrast.
- Hemoglobin is 13.
8.
Sorry, was I tugging too hard? Got another kid coming in.
What did she say? Andy? Buddy, why don't you just hold still? Let's worry about you first, okay? - Don't move your head.
- Just hang in.
You're doing great.
Hey.
Hi.
Pre-op labs are back on the gallbladder.
Lap choly's scheduled for this afternoon.
No films for the ischemic bowel yet.
And the aortobifemoral bypass went south with pneumonia 10 days post-op.
Yeah, I know.
I spoke to the family.
What's this? You prepping for the M and M? Heart rate, blood pressure, pulse ox, time of magnesium injection central line placed, pacemaker captured.
After seeing your M and M on Dr.
Swanson last year I thought it best to be well-prepared.
- I doubt it'll go like that.
- So do I, but - You know, l - Dr.
Benton, Dr.
Kotlowitz wants you.
- The Shimaharas are here.
- Oh, damn! Okay.
I'll be right there, Shirley.
He's putting a cochlear implant into a - I've never seen one.
- Yeah.
Neither have I.
If you need someone to bounce that stuff off of Oh, Peter, go.
I'm busy.
And you've got work to do as well.
I'll be there, Elizabeth.
I know you will.
Thanks.
One, two, three.
GSW to the abdomen.
Found pulseless and apneic.
Asystole on the monitor.
Had two rounds of epi and atropine.
A liter of saline in.
- What's the downtime? - 30 minutes.
I told the cops to wait outside.
Thoracotomy tray.
O-neg on the rapid infuser.
- I'll do a cutdown.
Last epi? - Five minutes ago.
- Go high-dose, three mgs.
- Need anything else? No, we got it.
Come on.
Hey, Pam.
Did you get a name? - Unconscious from the get-go.
- Okay, thanks.
Excuse me, nurse? Is that the kid hit by the car? Wilson Geary? I need to see him.
Not now.
What happened? Not sure.
Responded to the accident.
He was pretty shaken.
Paramedics took him, then we found the GSW.
- Did you get a name? - Yeah.
I got this.
Contacted his parents.
- And what about Wilson's family? - Working on it.
- Thanks.
- Sure.
- Andy! - Buddy, hey.
You gotta look at me right now, okay? We're gonna fix you up first.
Okay.
Doing a thoracotomy.
- Asystole? - 30 minutes.
- You got this? - Yeah.
All right, Wilson.
Be back in a little bit.
Okay.
- What are they doing? - They're trying to help him.
You mean cutting his clothes off and stuff? Yeah, that's right.
Ready to go for a ride? We're going down the hall to take a picture of your belly.
- Dr.
Anspaugh's not here.
- That's a lie.
- He's on the schedule.
- He can't see you.
- I need a minute.
- In the middle of a Whipple? Carter, be a good soldier.
They're thataway.
Hi.
I'm looking for Ruth Johnson.
Are you the doc? I've got a mole right here, back of my neck Edgar! Stop your mole talk! I'm Ruth Johnson.
Gilda here had to use the bathroom.
And you know how the young ones like someone to take them.
Nana, please.
Hi, I'm Gilda Bernucci.
Married an Italian.
Guess we all know what that means.
Nana, please.
Are you the ambassador? I guess so.
As you see, I don't need that thing.
But it seems to make everyone else happy.
Feels good anyway.
- Are you in? - Yeah.
Just a minute.
Okay, then.
Let's take a tour.
Can you page Dr.
Ross when Wilson Geary's films get back? - You got it.
- Thanks.
- Anyone talk to him? - Excuse me.
- Andy Stiles' parents are here.
- I'll get Dr.
Weaver.
It's his mom and her boyfriend.
Parents are divorced.
- And Wilson's family? - Business trip in Dallas.
We're looking.
He was staying at Andy's house.
Thanks for your help.
Hey, Kerry? Andy's mother is waiting in Chairs.
I'll talk to her.
Malik, she might want to come back.
I'll clean him up.
- How's the other boy? - Not sure.
He's just back from CT.
- Has anyone talked to him yet? - Family's out of town.
- Lf Doug's busy, let me know.
- Thanks.
Hey, Wilson.
How're you doing? Okay.
Hey, Andy can have that bed there.
How did you like the CT? It was no big deal.
I have some extra time.
I thought we could talk.
Okay.
Okay.
- Don't ask.
- I won't.
But it's the highlight of my day.
I'll wait for another elevator.
Good idea.
Lizzie! Glad to see you're in good spirits on your day of reckoning.
- Well, I'm sure it'll be fine.
- You've got me on your side.
It's not a matter of sides, but an examination of the event.
That's just the attitude to go in with.
In case we don't see each other again before the conference Well Best of luck.
- Fracture to the fourth mid-phalanx.
- I splinted it.
- Any word from the parents? - They're on their way from Dallas.
Broken finger and some road rash.
All things considered, he's lucky.
- Not really.
- That's pretty funny, isn't it? It's kind of amazing, really.
Hi.
I'm Carol Hathaway.
Detective Wilson, Chicago PD.
Wilson and I were just laughing about how we both have the same name.
That doesn't happen often.
It's not the same.
It's my first name.
Right.
Look, I need to ask you a few questions, Wilson.
- She doesn't have to leave, does she? - Nope.
I'm staying right here.
I'd like you to tell me about what happened in the park.
Someone hurt your friend Andy, right? She said Andy was dead.
Yeah, Wilson.
He is dead.
And you saw the man who was chasing him? Chasing you? Can you tell me if he was white, or black, Latino, or maybe Asian? - Do you know what those mean? - Yeah.
So which one was he? Did you know this man? You recognize him? Maybe you saw him in the park before? The police just want to find the man who did this.
So anything you tell them can help.
I don't know.
Well, was he a tall guy or a short guy? Kind of tall, maybe.
Did he come up on you all of a sudden or did you notice him earlier? He came up all of a sudden.
When are my mom and dad coming? - You said they were coming.
- They're on their way.
They'll be here as soon as they can.
You haven't gotten off the surgical floor yet? We're back on the surgical floor.
It's their favorite.
They'd like to observe an operation, if possible.
- Something in the open-heart variety.
- Settle down.
This won't kill you.
Is she you know, pretty well out of it? No, not at all.
She just has a tendency to doze off unannounced.
Right.
Well, carry on.
I'm awake.
Just playing possum.
I'm sick of meeting people.
Can we get out of here? - I don't know where we'd all fit.
- Oh, not them.
Us.
Once the implant's in, we'll repair the pericranium.
After his hair grows, you'd never know we were there.
Except he'll be able to hear.
We'll activate the device in a few months.
If you'll excuse me a minute He seems excellent.
Oh, yeah.
He's terrific.
He's very aggressive.
Aggressive? Well, I mean, as in "accomplished.
" So I guess you guys tried every other option for Patrick? We've done the hearing aids, intensive oral training, speech training Iooked into special teachers, special schools.
- We know this isn't a cure.
- No, no.
But, man! He'll hear a range of sounds.
Mr.
And Mrs.
Shimahara? Hi.
Here you go.
We'll take him to pre-op in a bit.
But in the meantime I'll see you.
- There's my boy.
- Hey, Patrick! Hey, big guy! Is this okay? You're not too cold? Not too cold.
This is a bit better view, I think.
At my age, anything vertical will do just fine.
So how does it feel to have 100 birthdays? Downright appalling.
I'm so old I can practically remember when this river ran the other way.
That's right! That's right, they changed it.
My husband, Everett, used to love this river staring down at it from 20 stories high.
He worked in one of these buildings here? Built them.
Construction spree after the First War.
Even worked on the Chicago Board of Trade Building.
We did real well.
Sent every child to college whether they wanted to go or not.
They must have appreciated it.
They seem pretty devoted.
Family should be.
Some are more than others.
My mom and dad, they They tend to travel a lot.
Oh, don't tell me your sad tale.
I hear enough of that at Happy Valley.
"My kids hate me.
I hate my kids.
My son never visits me.
" On and on.
Given that you never know what you'll get Everett and I were darn lucky in what we begot.
Well, I suppose we should be heading back.
They're all terrified I'm gonna die before they get this picture taken.
Okay.
Doug? Andy Stiles' mom and her boyfriend are here.
- Are you the ones who helped Wilson? - Yeah.
I'm Judy Stiles, Andy's mother.
This is Carl Dayton.
We're very sorry.
It's taking so long to make the arrangements.
- We want to see Wilson.
- He could use a familiar face.
- He's sleeping.
- We want to see how he is.
- And we want to talk to him.
- He hasn't said very much.
- The police were here earlier.
- What did he tell them? - He couldn't remember anything.
- Please.
He was the last person to see my son.
- All right.
- Okay.
For a few minutes.
All right.
Hey.
Wilson? Wilson? Some people who know you want to see you.
- What? - Hi, Wilson.
How you doing? I don't remember what happened.
I know.
That's okay, sweetie.
- You boys skip school again? - Carl.
- Always in trouble - Not now.
- How many times I gotta warn you? - You won't have to do it again! I'm sorry.
We shouldn't have skipped.
I'm really sorry.
I think we need to go.
All right.
Your mom and your dad are gonna be here real soon.
I know you're gonna be just fine.
Hey.
It's okay, Wilson.
It's okay.
Patients always postpone before holidays.
Nothing like surgery to make fruitcake seem like a good idea.
- Yeah.
Right.
- So I can fit in Reece next Tuesday.
But his age doesn't fit the FDA requirements.
It's been lowered to 18 months.
But his residual hearing is still high.
He's right on the bubble.
Here's the thing: We know it won't improve.
The sooner he can orient himself to a hearing world, the better.
- Huh? - Oh, yeah.
Right.
So, Vicky, let's put Reece Benton on my schedule for a cochlear implant, next Tuesday a.
m.
Good.
Good.
How we doing? Peter, you know Alex Babcock? - Anesthesiologist.
- Good to see you.
- How'd we do? - Kid sailed through pre-op.
Fentanyl oralet, a little Versed, paralyzed and intubated.
- How did the parents do? - They could've used some lollipops.
Okay, Peter.
So I'm going to implant the electrode directly out of the linea temporalis.
Then I'm going to put the microphone holder right behind the ear.
I'm gonna inject lidocaine.
And I'm going to make a flap, two centimeters from where I insert the device.
I'll cut through the muscle and pericranium so the flap will come right off the skull.
Alex, going to Aspen this year? No, too many snowboarders.
Felt like I was part of an obstacle course.
- Peter, can you see all right? - Yeah.
Don't want you to miss anything here.
There we go.
Hey.
What are you doing out of bed? - Looking for the bathroom.
- I'll take you.
No, I found it.
Then I'll take you to your bed.
You're looking better.
Are you feeling better? Wilson, what is it? Is something wrong? I should have told the policeman.
They're gonna keep asking me, aren't they? Well, they want to find out who did this.
If you remembered anything, I can get the detective.
No.
When you came here, you said there was a man chasing you.
He was white.
He seemed tall.
But I got on my bike right away.
Did you know this man? Have you seen him before? We'd seen him there earlier.
And we'd seen him before in the park when we'd play.
And if you saw this man again, would you recognize him? I don't know.
Maybe.
Do I have to talk to the policeman again? - When are my mom and dad coming? - Don't worry.
They'll be here.
Carol, the cops had to leave but they'll be back soon.
- They said your bike's at the station.
- Thanks, Jeanie.
- Are you sure it was this room? - No.
But I was in here earlier.
As I said, it's a randomized double-blind multi-center study funded by one of those hoo-hah biotech companies.
And the drug is for treating fracture pain? Comparing it against acetaminophen with codeine.
Hopefully, it'll be more effective with fewer side effects.
A colleague is coordinating it from Atlanta.
So you want me to conduct a study at County General.
Kerry's doing the sternal saw study.
I thought you might want this one.
- Lf you're game.
- I'm game.
Why not? Hey, doc.
Need some help? I was just helping Dr.
Lee.
We're trying to find her earring.
You know, that's okay.
I'm gonna check the desk.
Thanks, Mark.
That's a nurse's job.
They were busy replenishing albuterol and mixing ipratropium.
I was trying to help in an emergent situation.
- Who injected the magnesium? - I did.
Did you verify the dosage with the nursing staff? When did you realize your mistake? The patient went into respiratory arrest at 1534 fourteen minutes into the magnesium injection.
Continue, Dr.
Corday.
Endotracheal intubation was performed.
Heart rate dropped to 30.
The patient received IV calcium and atropine.
A transvenous pacing wire was placed, captured at 1556 hours.
- Who was Supervising Resident? - Dr.
Benton.
Who left you unsupervised.
She had the patient intubated and on a transvenous pacemaker.
Due to her quick response, the patient recovered with no cardiac or neurological sequelae.
It's important that we look at the outcome here.
Thank you, but I'm not looking to you for defense of my actions.
In fact, I feel that M and M has become a forum to place blame cover up mistakes, or be grateful that there's not a lawsuit.
I would argue that, actually, we should embrace our mistakes and learn from them to improve the system.
I erred not because I was untrained or incompetent but because I was exhausted, having been up for 36 hours.
If we really want to cut down on our errors why don't we, for example, allow on-call house officers to leave by 12 noon on the post-call day? Why don't we establish a night float system? Air traffic controllers work with airplanes four to six hours a day no more than two hours without a break.
Now, why? Because human life is at stake.
Yet we allow surgical interns to work 36 hours without sleep.
Why? Because we've all had to do it? Because the surgeons before us have had to do it? Tradition may be wonderfully nostalgic but it is clearly not in the best interests of our patients.
If you disagree with me, why don't you ask yourself next time you fly: Do you really want that man in the control room to be on his 36th hour? She's full of piss and vinegar.
- For an old lady.
- Because she's an old lady.
Everybody look at the camera lens.
If you're looking at the camera lens, you're in the picture.
And smile.
I just need Mrs.
Johnson's children inside for a quick picture.
She's done it again.
Mrs.
Johnson? Mrs.
Johnson, are you playing possum again? Come on, Ruth.
Time to wake up now.
Ruth? Mrs.
Johnson? Oh, God! Kit, go get a gurney and a crash cart now.
I don't want to bother you but the boys' clothes are all mixed up.
Andy's His boots are missing.
And I've got Wilson's sneakers.
I'm so sorry.
If you'll just have a seat, I'll go check for you.
Have you seen Wilson's belongings? Maybe check under the trauma gurney.
Conni, I need to talk to Wilson.
Can you give us a minute? - Sure.
- Thanks.
Wilson, wake up.
Hey, Wilson.
- Are my parents here? - No, not yet.
But I got to thinking.
Andy was probably your best friend, right? Sometimes.
When your parents were out of town on business, you'd stay there? It was closer to school.
We could ride our bikes.
So you probably shared each other's toys? Maybe even coats, gloves, boots? Andy would never let me wear his boots.
They're kind of too small, anyway.
Remember when you were trying to take them off? Right.
So if he never let you wear his boots then how come you were wearing them when the paramedics brought you here? - Because we had a bet and I won.
- A bet? To see who could ride faster from his house to the park.
And I won.
Whoever won got to wear the boots? Yeah.
But he wouldn't give them to me.
I rode faster and he knew it.
He wasn't being fair.
- Are these yours or Andy's? - Neither.
They're my dad's.
Wilson, did you put these into a gun? No, those are extras.
I already had some in the gun.
And when Andy didn't give you the boots you pointed the gun at him? And you shot him? Not to hurt him or anything.
Just to scare him.
We had a bet and I won.
It was fair and square.
You do know that you hurt him though, right? Look, all I meant was to get the boots.
You can't go back on a bet.
That's not right.
Andy knows that.
What did you do with the gun? I dropped it down a drain pipe when I got on my bike.
None of this would've happened if that car hadn't hit me.
You'll let me know when my parents get here? Yeah, Wilson.
I'll let you know.
Oh, Nurse Hathaway can you not tell my dad I threw his gun away? He'll get really mad.
- You're saying he could go home today? - There are no prisons for 8-year-olds.
I'm not talking prison.
I'm talking juvenile hall.
Not for kids under 10.
Can an 8-year-old even understand his rights? - Or the consequences of his actions? - Yes! He shot Andy to get the boots.
He wanted to scare the boy.
His intent wasn't to kill.
But he did kill him! - Doesn't that count? - Yeah, but what? Murder two? Manslaughter? The kid is 8 years old.
Isn't it up to the state? But he's gotta be assessed and get a psych evaluation.
Social Services has to see if he can differentiate between right and wrong.
He can.
Why would he make up a story about the man chasing them? Is he aware of what he's done? Has he shown any remorse? He's sorry he tossed the gun afraid his father will be mad.
Does that count as remorse? You're telling me the police, the courts, psych, Social Services nobody knows what to do with Wilson Geary? Pretty much.
What a mess! - Anything else you want me to do? - Not right now.
- I put her things in here.
- Thanks, Chuny.
I'll go talk to the family.
Apparently, she was sucking on a hard candy and it lodged in her windpipe.
We were able to extract it, and her BP is now 128/90.
Heart rate, 70.
Vital signs all appear normal.
- You mean she's not dead? - No, no.
She's not dead.
She's asleep, but definitely not dead.
- Can we see her? - Like I said, she's asleep so Dr.
Lee? I'm sorry.
We looked everywhere, and we couldn't find your earring.
Well, thank you, anyway.
- Did you lose an earring? - Yes.
Not expensive or anything.
But sentimental value.
Yes.
I was engaged once.
To a really lovely man.
And he was killed in a freak horseback riding accident.
Actually, we were on a bridge and the horse spooked and - Anyway, he gave them to me.
- I'm so sorry.
Thanks.
It was a long time ago.
Yeah.
David Kotlowitz, please.
Peter Benton.
Hey, David.
Listen, I I wanted to postpone Reece's operation.
I mean, he's barely within the age range.
He has a fair amount of residual hearing and the technology's changing all the time.
Yeah.
No, I just saw him.
He's doing fine.
Yeah, well, you too.
Have a great holiday, all right? My parents called on the way from the airport.
My dad has a phone in his car.
You're mad at me, aren't you? No.
When my mom's mad, she stands at the sink and does dishes.
And she doesn't say anything.
I'm not mad, Wilson.
I'm sad about what happened to Andy.
It would've been so cool if he was in one of these other beds.
Do you know what it means to be sad? Wilson, do you know what it means to have done something wrong? Carol.
His parents are here.
Thanks, Conni.
Are you waiting on a bus? I wish I was on a bus going anywhere.
- How'd it go with Anspaugh? - Well, no crime, no punishment.
Seems what I did wasn't terribly wrong.
No need to penalize me.
No need to examine a system that's served so many, so well, for so long.
They seemed pretty shocked that you actually suggested it.
As were you.
Oh, well, it wouldn't have been my choice.
Well, you and I never make the same choices, do we? No.
Well, Peter, we could now.
Come on, Peter.
This should be over.
Some would argue that it already is.
We haven't been alone for weeks.
I need to focus on my son right now.
Look, we could both draw up a list of reasons why.
But why don't we just put it down to faulty construction? A casual relationship has to grow into something or it dies.
It's not like I haven't wanted this to grow.
It's just that I I don't have it to give right now.
L I understand that.
Which is why I think maybe we'd be better off as friends.
I'll see you around, okay? You probably didn't know it, but we've been off work for 20 minutes.
Want to get something to eat? Rosebud, Morton's, Johnny D's? - Home, bathtub, bed.
- That's my girl.
I met them today, you know? They seemed like perfectly normal people.
Father sells office supplies.
Mother went to Dallas with him.
- She wanted to see her favorite aunt.
- Wilson's parents? Thought they'd be monsters to raise a kid like that.
That would explain everything, right? The parents beat the kid.
Or they yell at him, or starve him.
So he ends up killing his best friend.
Then why did he do it? Stuff happens.
An 8-year-old shoots another kid and you say, "Stuff happens"? You got a better answer? No.
No, I don't.
I don't know.
Maybe his genes are screwy.
Or his parents seem nice but they ignore him? Maybe he plays too many video games like every kid in America.
Doesn't it bother you that there isn't any reason? No.
It bothers me that you cared about him, and you believed in him and now you feel betrayed.
I don't feel betrayed.
I feel scared.
If you don't know what causes it, how do you keep it from happening? Are we any different from them? I mean, they didn't see it coming.
Would we? You bring a child into this world, and you think they're helpless.
But, actually, I think it's us.
We're the ones that are helpless.
We probably are.
But that's why you love them as much as you can.
And you teach them as best you can.
And then you wish them good luck.
So, what do you say? Home bath, bed? Yeah.
If you don't have any plans.
If you're not busy.
- Drinks sound great.
Can we eat too? - Dinner, absolutely.
I'm meeting with Anspaugh for 20 but I'll be right back.
We're going home.
You? - Catching up on paperwork and - Curfew's at 11.
Very funny.
ER.
How about this snow? - It's great.
- Have a good shift.
You gotta help me! My wife's having a baby! Hang on, let me look.
- We're not due for two more weeks.
- Yeah? Somebody lied.
Oh, God, please help me.
Help me.
- We're gonna help you.
- Get Mark and a gurney.
- Do something, please.
- Ma'am, I'm a doctor.
All right.
I got it.
Help me up.
- Good.
You know how to breathe.
- This is our fourth.
- It's coming.
- When did it start snowing? - Crowning! - We're not due yet.
- Must be all the excitement.
- What's your name? - Louis Bernucci.
This is Gilda.
- Nice to meet you.
You ready to push? On the next one, push.
Ready? And one, two, three.
Push.
If it's a girl, I want to name it after Nana.
Ruth? Ruth Johnson.
Ruth Johnson Bernucci.
What do you think? It sounds good to me.
- Yeah? - Yeah.
Okay, Gilda.
I like that.
You're doing great.
Good.
This one, push.
This is it.
Push! Oh, God! Okay, the head's clear.
Shoulders.
There we go.
Beautiful baby girl.
Okay, good.
Let's wrap her.
There's your mama.
There's your mom.
There's your mama.
Okay, clamp.
Excellent.
We're just gonna take over here just for a minute.
Just a minute.
Coming right back to Mom.
Good job.
You are so beautiful.
Good luck, Ruth Johnson.