McMillan & Wife (1971) s01e05 Episode Script

Death Is a Seven Point Favorite

(female dispatcher) 4 1 2, 4 1 2, officer in need of assistance.
Proceed to Marina Bay Drive.
4 1 2, 4 1 2, officer i n need of assistance.
Proceed to Mari na Bay Drive.
[police siren wailing] (officer) All right, come along.
Well, we got him! Yes, we did.
You're all wet, sir.
Yes, we are.
[laughing] (Enright) Sir, about the football game Sunday, there could be trouble.
(Mac) What kind of trouble? Well, a bookie was killed in Las Vegas last week and locally there's been very heavy betting on the game Sunday.
Now, maybe they tie in, maybe they don't, but lots of bookies are coming into town for the game.
Bookies don't come into town to watch football, Sergeant.
They have scouts for that.
They get together only when they have a problem.
I understand, sir.
The question is, what's the problem? Put out some feelers.
I'll bet you it has something to do with football.
[players chattering] (man) All right, all right, let's go! [man chattering] (man) Five, six, hut.
Hut! [players grunting] [whistle blowing] [players chattering] (man) Hut.
Hut.
Hello, ladies and gentlemen, this is Sandy King with another Hawks-Eye View, your inside, pre-game look at your team.
Today, we have an unusual opportunity to get some inside facts as we talk to Lowball Lewis, the team trainer.
Hi, Lowball.
Hi, Sandy.
First of all, Lowball, what is the condition of Vic Whelan's leg? The doc says his leg is a lot better, but not as good as those.
Oh, come on, Lowball, we're on tape here.
I'm going to rewind this thing, we got to start all over.
Oh, any time.
(Timber) I told you to keep these series of plays in order.
What are you doing to me? Hi! (Timber) What are you doing here? I can't coach the team with you, with you standing around like that.
Hello, Mrs.
McMillan.
Hi, Mr.
Royce.
Nice to see you.
You, too.
You got a cigarette? No, I don't smoke.
Neither do l.
Mrs.
McMillan has come for that autographed football.
Football? I gave it to that kid, Whizzer, that kid that hangs around.
Hey, Whizzer! [blowing] Whizzer! Do they bite? Only when we lose.
Where is that kid? Hey! Who's got that special autographed football? Look around for it.
How many white footballs have we got? Everybody! Let's look for that white football! Coach, think that could be it? Yeah, that looks like it.
Well, uh Oh, come on, Lowball, do you mind? We're trying to do a show here.
Oh, sorry, but Wow! Yeah, right! Wow! Right.
Well, let's start over again.
I see you found it.
Yes.
Father Monahan and the kids are really gonna dig this.
Oh, Mr.
Royce! I'll be right back, Sandy.
Oh, you are beautiful, Lowball, you are beautiful.
Did you get a chance to think-- The answer is no, Lowball.
I'm the owner and manager of a football team, I'm not a benevolent organization.
But I really need-- As a trainer you're a great storyteller.
Last time was your transmission, before that your grandmother.
No, there's no story this time.
And no loan either, Lowball.
Mr.
Royce, maybe l-- This will take a minute.
Can we talk-- What is this, a Chinese torture? No is no is no.
You got a cigarette? Oh, sure, sir, right here.
Get out of here, you know I've given up smoking.
Poor guy.
I'm the poor guy! They're always hitting me for money! Timber, Lowball, Vic Whelan, Sandy King.
What am l, a money fountain? Well, see you later, Mr.
Royce.
Thanks a lot again.
[players shouting] [screaming] Uh, I don't know if you noticed it, but I'm not one of the players! I did, that's why I tackled you.
I didn't want you to get off the field without my autograph.
You're Billy Benton.
Oh, you know me? (Sally) Who doesn't? Well, I don't know you.
Sally McMillan.
Married.
Oh, heartbroken! You'd better sign right there.
Sure.
Who's it for? It's for Father Monahan's School for Boys.
Father Joe! Too much.
I was one of his boys.
I was raised in the orphanage.
He's the only family I ever had.
[signing] Hey, why don't I go with you when you deliver the ball? To the orphanage? Sure.
Oh, wow! The kids would go crazy meeting you.
I've got to get the rest of their autographs first.
Good, that will give me time to practice my passes.
Maybe next time you'll connect.
Right.
[cars honking] Let's try Sacramento Street, Brady.
It might be a little bit faster.
Right, sir.
How far is Father Monahan's School for Boys? About 20 minutes by car, sir.
Three if you walk.
I'll walk.
(Mac) Hi, honey.
Hi, darling.
I made the mistake of taking the car, traffic was as usual.
Oh, you should do something about that, Commissioner.
I intend to.
I'm gonna sell the car.
Mac, you know Billy Benton.
Hi.
He volunteered to join me this afternoon.
Great.
It's a pleasure.
You have great legs.
Thank you.
I mean, hers.
I agree, especially the left one.
Here.
There.
Oh.
Well, I guess I've had enough to drink.
Sorry, darling.
How did you two meet? Oh, he tackled me.
(Mac) He tackled you? I didn't know that she was married, and I didn't realize you were so big.
Be careful now.
Oh.
[laughs] You did that on purpose, I know it! Me, no.
Oh, right in the eye.
That's what I like, one-on-one coverage.
Well, every once in a while I get caught holding, but I get to pay the penalty.
If I weren't in training, I'd drink to that.
Why don't you eat to it? Join us for dinner tonight.
No bachelor wants to have dinner with a quiet, sedate, old, heavily married couple.
Where? No matter how charming you are.
Hey, Commissioner, that's not true.
I'm aware of my reputation, but that only sells tickets.
If I had my choice, I'd rather be with my friends.
There, I told you.
You're gonna have dinner with us tonight.
Well, thanks, but I can't.
I have a couple of dates and l-- Bring her along, bring both along, we'd love it, wouldn't we? Sure, we would.
They're a little different, you know.
[laughing] Well, any time you can join us, please do.
You have the football? Yes, I got the football.
Isn't it neat? This would mean a lot to Father Monahan.
He'll put it in permanent exhibition in the trophy case.
I don't think so.
Why? I thought it was for the kids.
Whoa.
(Sally) Something is smudged and then it says "is trying to kill me.
" Enright, I want you to talk to the entire team, one at a time.
Harlan Royce's name is above the message, Vic Whelan's is below.
Billy, where are they? Vic Whelan's over there and I don't see Harlan Royce.
Listen, I got to change and practice, I'll see you people later.
Right.
Enright, you talk to Vic Whelan, I'll talk to Sandy King.
One step slower and I can keep up with you.
Well, Vic, for a guy who's not going to be in there very much this year, you're sure taking it with a smile.
Look, I'm a pro.
If Billy helps the team, that's all that matters.
I'm for the guy.
Since you're not gonna be playin' much, won't it be difficult staying in training, uh, follow the rules, keep that curfew, especially for a bachelor? Well, anything can happen.
You got to stay in shape.
Right, well, our time is up.
Thank you, Vic Whelan, for this talk and your honest comments.
This is Sandy King, closing out another Hawks-Eye View.
Thanks, Sandy.
Sorry it didn't work.
Huh? What do you mean? You stirring up trouble.
You worried about losing your job? Vic Mr.
King, there's a question I'd like to ask you-- Vic Whelan is some terrific actor.
Actor? Benton takes the ball from his hands, the bread from his mouth, he has nothing but compliments.
Don't believe it.
You signed this football for my wife.
Hey, hey, something's happened! Come quick, will you? There's been trouble! Mac, I think I'll wait on the field.
Yeah, go ahead.
Commissioner? His name was Willy White.
We all called him Whizzer.
A real nice kid.
What did he do? Oh, he just ran errands.
You know, he was a gofer.
Go for this, go for that.
See what you can find out about him.
Yes, sir.
Looks like a kitchen knife.
Probably from in here.
Here! Take this down to Headquarters.
Check this out.
Yes, sir.
Anything so far? Uh, more prints than we can handle.
Who'd have left the field during practice? Everyone goes on and off the field.
Phone calls, towels, men's room.
There's no way of counting.
All right, Lowball, tell me exactly how you found the body.
Sure, I'll show you, come on.
See, I was coming down this, uh, this corridor here on my way to the rubdown room and I made the turn here and I walked on by without thinking what I saw and I got clear down to here and suddenly I thought: "frozen shoelaces?" So I went back and opened the box and he fell out! You couldn't have seen any frozen shoelaces, the counter is in the way.
Now, why did you open the refrigerator door? Well, I was looking for a soft drink, you see, and sometimes they leave them in there.
And they leave mustard and ketchup and I take 'em home.
All right, Lowball, that's all for now.
How you doin'? The boy's dead.
[sighs] There's nothing as desolate as an empty stadium.
It's like a big carton with 90,000 empties.
(Sandy) McMillan, why can't l leave the field? I've got to get this story on the air.
You'll have to wait, we want to talk with you later.
I'm a suspect? Everyone's a suspect.
You worked on the city desk for two years.
You know how we operate.
Stick around.
Thanks a lot, McMillan.
Can I go home or am I a suspect? Did you do it? No.
Okay, then you can go home.
No, I can't, I left my car at Father Monahan's.
Wait for a few minutes, we'll drive you over there.
Okay.
I feel like walking.
I think I'll meet you in the parking lot.
Bye, darling.
I could use a drink, how about you? Yeah, I could use one.
But I'm not in training.
What, are you adopting me? Did you adopt Whizzer? No, it's just the opposite.
He adopted me.
I guess I did.
What do you know about him? Uh, he had a crooked smile, he needed attention.
Nothing really.
Kids get hung up on football players, you know.
He got my sandwiches for me, got my bottled water, ran my errands I gave him a couple of bucks, a pat on the back.
What are you looking at? Bloodstains on your shirt.
Did you ever get hit by a 300-pound tackle? Go check.
It's your job, isn't it? That's right, it's my job.
I'll keep it.
Hey, Billy! I-- It's all right, he's one of ours, I think.
Oh, I got a lead on the kid's family.
They're sharecroppers.
I want to pick up the expenses for the funeral.
Why? I feel sorry for the kid.
No, because he liked me.
Commissioner? Mmm-hmm.
Look, Royce left about a half hour ago, but we found the kid's bike.
Good.
Now, Billy-- Hmm.
Don't leave town.
Exactly.
(Mac) This is Whizzer's bike.
(Sally) Boy, it's so new! And expensive.
Especially on a couple of bucks a day.
Mmm-hmm.
You know, for a young bike, it's got an awful lot of mileage on it.
Wow, it does have a lot of mileage on it, doesn't it? What do those look like to you? Well, they could be bookie slips, sir, but I wouldn't bet on it.
I would.
Check the code of the vice squad and see if you can find a way of getting this bike to the lab.
Oh, but I already have.
He's gonna go to the lab and end up in the hospital.
If Whizzer was a bagman What's a bagman? A bagman is one who collects money from the runners.
What's a runner? A runner, Sally, is someone who collects money from the bettors.
Maybe he was killed because he knew something he shouldn't.
Like, how the next game was going to turn out.
Four days before it's played.
Where'd you park the car? Right up there.
I don't think Billy had anything to do with it.
I think you don't want to think Billy had anything to do with it.
He's a good guy, Mac.
I have it on the best of authority.
Oh, yeah, who? Me, and I know a good guy when I see one.
That's a compliment.
Why a written message and not a phone call? Why would they want to kill a kid? What could-- What could he know? I have one more question.
What? Are you coming home for dinner tonight? Depends on the answer to one question.
I love you.
That's not the question.
It certainly is the answer.
Okay.
Stuffed peppers.
What? That's what we're having for dinner tonight.
Oh, I love them, too.
[chuckles] Be careful.
(Mildred) Hey, Mrs.
McMillan.
Is it good to see you! I forgot my keys-- I left my keys inside the Both of us together.
Well, it's a good thing we keep a spare one in the potted plant.
That's for sure.
I used it the other day.
Listen, I have good news.
I just saw Al about placing a bet on the Hawks.
You know you're not supposed to bet with a bookie.
Especially not Al.
Mac just got him off.
Yeah, but with Al we only have to give 6 points.
Earlier this morning, it was 1 5.
That means the betting odds have dropped.
Really? Yeah.
You look for that.
The bet was supposed to be with Grace, that way it'd be a nice friendly $2 wager.
Yeah, but the odds with Al are better and $2 is $2.
This one needs water.
I still think the maid would've been a better bettor.
Mrs.
McMillan, Mmm-hmm.
could you have used the spare key yesterday and left it inside the house after you used it? Yes, I could have.
Did you? Yes, I did.
What are we going to do? [both exclaim] I think we are going to go inside.
That's a lovely idea.
I wonder why the point spread changed.
I'll ask Mac, he'll know.
You're not going to tell him! I have to tell him.
If you tell Mr.
McMillan that the odds are changing, he's gonna figure out that I'm placing bets.
And betting is illegal.
I'll tell him without incriminating us.
How? Uh Don't worry.
I'll tell him so that he won't know about the bet.
Uh-huh.
You want to bet? (Mac) Hi, honey.
Concocted for your pleasure.
I hope it pleases you, milord.
Uh, taste this.
Why? Because I think you're trying to poison me.
There's no other explanation for this preamble you just delivered.
I have something to tell you.
What? I'll only tell you if you promise you won't ask how I know what I'm going to tell you.
Okay, how do you know? I'll ask you before you start.
I can't tell you.
I, I don't want to hurt an innocent party.
Who isn't very innocent.
I'll drink to that.
Arriba.
Abajo.
Arriba.
Abajo.
Al centro.
A dentro.
Al centro.
A dentro.
Do you like it? A lot of sugar.
Oh.
Do we have a deal? Y es! Y es.
The point spread on the Hawks game has gone down.
Drastically, I might add.
How do you know? I mean, uh Uh Did it happen in the last couple of hours? Yes.
What does it mean? Is that included in the deal? What are you doing? Calling Al.
He's a bookmaker.
Oh, how do you know Al, uh, still makes book? Well, he doesn't really, it's every once in a while people force bets on him.
Oh.
Al, it's Mac.
Tell me, what's the scam on the Hawk game Sunday? Where's the money coming from? Uh-huh.
Uh-huh.
Okay, Al, thanks.
Where's the money coming from? According to the grapevine, there were two very suspicious bets.
Oh.
One is for $2, Oh.
and the other was for $75,000.
Oh.
Which one bothers you the most? Both.
But the $75,000 bet has some other people nervous.
You think it's coming from someone closely associated with the team? I think it has and I think that's why the bookies dropped the spread.
You know, Mac, I don't see what's wrong with a player betting on his own team to win.
Because it's illegal.
And it's worse if he bets on the other team.
The other team? How could you bet on the other team? Who could control the outcome of a football game? [snickering] The coach, the owner.
Among other people, the quarterback.
Billy! Billy.
Commissioner, Whizzer didn't have a police record.
But he's gotten two traffic tickets in the last couple of weeks, right here.
He never caused anybody trouble.
Well, he caused somebody trouble.
Traffic division says that he used to park his bike somewhere behind these stores in the alley.
So he worked for one of these shop owners, huh? Question is, which one of the bookies-- Commissioner, there's a delicatessen there.
It serves terrific pastrami, great pickles and sensational sauerkraut-- Sergeant, I've had breakfast.
Oh, yeah, so have l.
Commissioner, if there's a fix on in this game, it's because somebody wants or needs money.
If what Mrs.
McMillan heard at the field is true, there's Harlan Royce, Timber, Lowball, Sandy King, Vic Whelan.
Why Vic Whelan? Well, Billy took over his old job.
Oh, yeah.
Anyway there's that great deli over there with the fantastic pastrami, the great pickles and the-- Sensational sauerkraut and a coin and stamp shop, a pet shop, and a barber shop, and a ladies' lingerie.
You ever been in there? Huh? Ladies' lingerie shop? [laughing] Oh, no, no, the barber shop.
Oh, no, sir.
You take that.
Commissioner, if I'm going to go in there and try to get information without seeming suspicious, I got to get a haircut.
Uh-huh.
Well, I don't need a haircut.
Uh, but if I may be so bold, sir, you could.
I couldn't.
Sally would divorce me.
Why? She cuts my hair.
But I get my haircuts from old Vern.
What's old Vern gonna say when I come in in a couple of weeks with a different haircut? I just can't hurt old Vern.
I can understand that.
Thank you, sir.
I'll see you after I get my haircut.
[scissors clacking] ////[music playing] Your hairdresser's name is George Harvard.
It is? My card.
Your name, sir? Uh, Sergeant Bill Sergeant.
What will it be, Bill? Trim, wave set, curl emphasis or complete re-do? Oh, l--I think just a trim would be fine.
Uh, you need a re-do.
Well, how long will that take? It's unimportant, time will fly.
But with your shaped head and that large but strong jaw, just re-shaping the hair, "freeing it," one might say, to a fundamental look will do wonders for you.
Oh.
How much is something like that? $40 the first visit.
[phone ringing] Well, maybe next week.
Just a trim.
Yes, sir.
Pardon me, Bill.
George Harvard here.
Right.
Fine.
I'll put you down for that.
Uh, uh, just, just once over, lightly.
I've only taken a small amount, Bill.
[phone ringing] George Harvard.
Right.
I'll put you down for it.
You know, you're very popular.
Some people find me indispensable.
I noticed that you do haircuts for lots of the Hawks.
Hairdress, not haircut.
Yes.
Almost to a man.
[phone ringing] George Harvard.
Right.
You've got it.
Excuse me.
Oh.
Hey, Do you do Billy Benton's hair? No, he's the only one I don't.
But, maybe someday.
You know, with all those football players comin' in here, I bet you know a lot about football.
Hmm.
The odds, things like that.
I pick up a little chit-chat.
Hey! Uh, do you happen to know a place where I can make a bet on the Hawks? Don't you have any friends? I don't bet with friends.
That's very wise.
Neither do l.
Uh, what are you doin'? I mean, uh, you're doin' more than trimmin'.
Just a little re-shaping.
I couldn't resist.
But you'll love it.
Say goodbye to the old Bill Sergeant and hello to you real self.
[sighs] Well, it's--it's very nice! Thank you, sir.
Of course, I'm not really committed to it myself yet.
But he said if I didn't like it, I could just comb it out with a little water.
But he'd really like me to live with it for a while, you know what I mean, sir.
I mean, it really is fundamental, isn't it? Even though it does take a little bit of getting used to.
[tram bell ringing] What did you find out? Uh, th-th-that sauerkraut is terrible.
Uh, what about you? We don't have to look any further, sir.
It's a bookie joint, all right.
You know, if my barber, a guy, yeah, a guy named George Harvard gave haircuts to all the people who call him, he'd be six feet deep in hair.
I mean, I think he's burying his bets in his appointment book.
I copped a look at the book, sir, and I found Harlan Royce's name in it.
So where does that leave us? I don't know, but I know where it takes us.
Yeah, Harlan Royce.
(Royce) Come in! Well, I'm glad you're here, sit down.
I'm plenty upset about this.
Who could have done it? We don't know yet.
Why didn't anybody see the message.
Oh, I know, they were watching your wife, I was watching your wife.
Terrible.
It's te-- Do you have a cigarette? No, no, no, don't give it to me.
I always like to smoke when I'm nervous.
I've had the commissioner of football on the phone four times today already, collect! My own announcer is pressuring me and what I don't understand is who wanted Whizzer dead? We think, Whizzer may have been a bagman.
A bagman! Oh, I can't believe I ca-- I ca-- I ca-- l I need a cigarette.
No.
No.
No! No.
No.
No, as far as I've heard, he was a nice kid that use to hang around with Billy and the team and did errands.
Excuse sir, do you happen to know George Harvard? Well, of course, I know George Harvard, he's my barber.
Matter of fact I'm due there later on this afternoon.
You ought to go to him, he's marvelous.
As a matter of fact, you could use a re-do.
I just had one, sir.
Oh.
(Royce) Oh, yeah.
See, that's pretty Yeah.
Uh, as--as a matter of fact, that's terrific! Well, thank you, sir.
Mr.
Royce, what do you know about the syndicate and its connections if any, with the Hawks? There aren't any.
If there were, I'd have to report them to the commissioner of football and to the police.
I just paid one million smokers Smackers for Billy Benton.
Do you think I'd jeopardize that by not playing football according to the rules? Cigarette? You said not to give you one, sir.
Right! Give me one.
I don't smoke.
I don't use 'em.
Did you get the cigarettes, yet? (secretary) You told me not to, no matter what you said.
You're fired.
[sighs] Where were you yesterday when Whizzer was murdered? I was here.
Well, we checked that out, sir.
You said your were but you weren't.
I don't mean here, I mean, I was with the technicians, there was some problem with the scoreboard.
I had a pack around here someplace.
Do you have any idea who might have attacked Whizzer? Well, I'm not going to single anybody out, that's your job.
My job is to run this office and to try to find some damn cigarettes.
Yes, sir.
Did the cigarettes come yet? You just fired me, Mr.
Royce.
Can you believe that? You just can't find any decent help nowadays.
What conclusion have you reached, sir? One thing.
He's definitely trying to quit smoking.
Commissioner.
Commissioner, if I don't come up with somethin' on who killed Whizzer first, I could lose a good job.
Uh, not on the record.
Okay, off the record.
Sergeant, tell him our theory.
Our theory is that Whizzer was assaulted with a deadly weapon by a person or persons unknown, to the detriment of his well-being.
We believe the assailant to be clever, ruthless, and so far, invisible.
[gun firing] Stay down.
I am down.
Sandy, that shot was meant for you.
Come on, Enright.
(Enright) Police.
Police! One thing's for sure, whoever it is has got to be out of breath.
[all breathing heavily] Did anyone just run in here? Yeah.
We all did, we just finished our wind sprints.
Anyone in here have a permit for a gun? Or a gun without a permit? Lowball's got one.
It's an old gun I use for a starter's pistol.
Get it.
Sure.
It's not there.
I guess I got my story.
"Hawks announcer is shot at in parking lot, the assailant is clever, ruthless, and invisible.
" Hey, wait a minute.
I lent it to somebody.
Who was it? Billy! I lend it to you, remember? What would I want with a pistol? Good question.
Got an answer? Sure I have an answer.
I never borrowed it.
Hey, what are you trying to pull, Lowball? Get a couple of men down here and look for that gun.
Commissioner, can you spare a third man? I'd like some protection.
That's standard procedure.
How much do you think Sandy knows? I don't know! You know.
I talked to him and I still don't know.
You know.
You're saying you don't know 'cause you don't want me to know what you know.
I don't know and if I did know, you know I'm not going to get caught up in that again.
Why would anyone want to kill Sandy? That wouldn't change the odds or the point spread, would it? No, I shouldn't think so.
What are the odds now, do you know? 10-1.
10-1? 10-1 I'll be asleep in one minute.
[grunts] What's the matter? Are you all right? Got a cramp in my toe.
Can I help you? You're turning red.
[sighs] I'm glad we're going to bed early.
What time is it? 9: 20.
We haven't done this since when? Since never.
Oh.
That long, huh? Uh-huh.
(Sally) Oh, no.
Well, if that's how you feel, I won't propose what I had in mind.
No.
That wasn't an "oh, no" for you.
That was an "oh, no!" oh, no.
I've got to get in touch with Janet.
Why? The Stantons are having a party for the team tonight and I promised them that we'd be there.
What am I going to tell Janet? Uh, tell her the truth.
The truth? Of course, there is nothing like the truth.
I think she can handle it.
Hi, Janet, it's Sally.
Uh, yes, that's what I was calling you about.
I'm really sorry about tonight.
You won't believe what happened.
Mac tore a ligament in his leg and I had to take him down to the hospital.
We are not gonna possibly be able to make it.
Well, there's nothing like the truth.
That was nothing like it.
[chuckles] No, Janet.
No, no, no it's not that bad.
Uh, no, Janet, really, no, it's not that bad.
He is not in bed or anything, no.
Janet, listen, Janet, we'll be right over.
Boy, did I handle that.
How much of a limp do you want? Well, I think you could be a little Oh, Mac! [phone ringing] Hello? Yes, he is right here.
Just a moment.
En? Right.
Hello.
Hello, Commissioner, did I wake you? No, Sergeant.
Hmm, I'm sorry.
Uh, I mean, I just thought you'd like to know, sir, that we found the gun in Vic Whelan's locker.
It had Billy Benton's fingerprints on it.
Pick me up, I'll be downstairs.
That was about Billy, wasn't it? Yes.
Please don't say anything.
Let me say it.
You've got a lot on your mind, so I'm gonna go to the Stanton's party by myself.
You and Enright can go do whatever it is that you've got to do.
A: You are a great wife.
B: I love you very much.
C: What are you going to tell Janet? Oh, I'm goin' to tell her the truth.
I believe it.
Well, I'll think of something.
No limp, you're going with Enright.
Are you sure this is Billy's apartment? (Enright) Of course it is, sir.
I checked it out.
I thought this was Billy Benton's apartment.
It is.
I'm Vic Whelan.
You know, the old quarterback.
I didn't know you were roommates.
We're not.
I had some trouble with my wife.
Billy said I could spend the night.
I'd like to talk to him.
May we come in? He's not in right now.
Doesn't that violate curfew? When you think of it, I guess it does.
Listen, Vic, where did he go? I don't know, he made a call and split.
I'll check and see if he used the house phone.
Vic, we found the gun that was fired at Sandy in your locker.
I don't know anything about any gun in my locker.
There was no gun when I left the field.
I've never shot anybody in my life.
Where in my locker? In your shoe.
Somebody put it there after I left the field.
Your signature was right next to the message on the football.
I don't know anything about any message.
If this is an attempted murder investigation, you haven't told me my rights.
Nothing I've said can be used.
Nobody asked you anything.
Operator, this is Sgt.
Enright of San Francisco Police.
Would you please tell me where the last outgoing phone call was made from this extension.
Thank you.
Thank you, Vic, we'll see you later.
(Enright) The door is open, sir.
Uh, no, sir, this time I go first.
Harvard's work area is over there.
Ooh, hey, that was pretty good.
I don't usually get tackled from behind.
[sighs] Don't touch me, you're a cop.
I'd like my haircut back.
I don't take care of cops.
I can see why.
I shouldn't have wasted my talent on-- All right.
All right.
Let's begin at the beginning, shall we? Any volunteers? He wanted the bigger tip.
Why did you call him? Personal.
Money? I don't like what you're thinking-- I don't like it, either.
Why did you come here? He's spreading rumors around that I'm betting against my own team.
Is it true? Wouldn't it be freaky to admit, even if it were true that I had financial dealings with a bookie? You're calling me a bookie.
I'll get you for this.
That's a stupid thing to say in front of witnesses.
Relax.
We know you're a bookie.
You think I'm a bookman then charge me, take me in or let me go.
We are aware of the options.
Sit down, shut up.
What was the fight about? Billy? It wasn't a fight.
He got in a cheap shot with his hair dryer.
Level with me, Billy.
Commissioner, I am leveling with you.
Why would I want to be involved with a guy that makes book? Because you're making some tax-free loot.
You laid $75,000 against your own team.
I'm clean.
If you're scared, you call off all the bets, man, and keep your mouth shut, you understand? That's what this thing is about.
He thinks I'm dumping the game.
No way.
Did you take a $75,000 bet? I don't take bets.
Then what makes you so sure that one of the team placed the bet? Where do you get your information? Book him.
You're coming with me, Billy.
Come on.
I wouldn't touch your head again-- Come on.
(Mac) I don't know where she keeps those Band-Aids.
I've looked in the medicine chest, the bathroom drawer, the kitchen sink.
[sighs] Hi, Mac.
Oh, the party was awful.
After I got there everybody was gone.
Billy! What happened to your forehead? It's bleeding.
Oh.
Where did you keep the Band-Aids? I'll get them for you.
Do you always keep your Band-Aids in the icebox? They feel better when they're cold.
I suppose you keep your coffee in the medicine cabinet.
Upstairs I do.
Downstairs, I keep it in a coffee canister.
That must make it difficult to find.
You look like you've been in a fight.
Yeah, I was.
You'd never know it.
Is everything all right? How about an answer? Well, not really.
Ah, there's this guy out there that thinks I'm a crook.
I'd punch him in the nose.
He did.
Hey, this is really pretty.
Where was it taken? On our honeymoon.
Where'd you go? To bed.
Coffee is cooking in there.
Is he in real trouble, Mac? Mmm-hmm.
I take my coffee with no cream and no two sugars.
You're lucky it's ready.
Why am I really in trouble? Your prints were found on Lowball's gun.
How do you explain it? I can't.
I don't know what to say.
I have never even seen the gun before.
I had no reason to shoot Sandy.
Do l? I really appreciate you're not booking me.
That's exactly what somebody wants.
If you're booked, you'll be suspended, you won't be able to play on Sunday.
Ah.
How do I thank you? Make sure I'm right.
You're right.
What I don't understand is how could Billy's fingerprints get on a gun that he's has never seen.
Brandy? Brandy.
There is another question that nobody has answered.
Well, I have a question I think can be answered.
Where is the Oh, straight back and to the right.
Excuse me.
Yeah.
Everything's too pat, Sally.
I think Billy's being framed.
Whizzer was his friend.
The gun had his fingerprints on it.
The bookie said it was his bet against his own team.
I'm glad you believe in Billy.
Hmm.
There's something about him that brings out the paternal instinct.
Maternal.
Paternal.
Maternal, too.
I thought to women he was a sex symbol.
Well, maybe to other women he is a sex symbol, but to me Billy is, uh Well he is, simply a Sex symbol.
Well, he is rugged and handsome and good looking, but you know that's not my type.
(Billy) Well, I have to go.
Could you call me a cab? Sure, you're a cab.
Want to take a drive.
I do nothing better.
I don't want to put you out.
No trouble.
Safe as tailing you home.
Well, thanks for the lift.
Sorry for the inconvenience.
Battery in my car was dead, I didn't know it.
You know, I kind of like this.
It's like, it's like being in a huddle, except with much prettier people.
Thanks again.
Good night, Billy.
Good night.
Good night, Billy.
You want to talk? Mmm-hmm.
I talk.
How was the party? Not very good.
By the time I got there, everybody who counts had gone home.
Who counts? The bachelors.
I thought most of the team was married.
Most of the team is married, but there's a couple of groovy bachelors.
Larry Sloane is a bachelor, Vic Whelan is a bachelor, Billy Benton is a bachelor-- No, no, Vic Whelan is married.
No, he's a bachelor.
No, he's married.
No, he is not.
Yes, he is.
He must be.
Uh-uh.
I read the programs, I ought to know who's a bachelor.
But he just told me that We're going back to Billy's.
[grunting] Mac, one of those guys is Billy! [Billy grunting] Billy, watch out! That is your passing hand.
Billy, that's your good hand.
And I'm your good husband.
You're no help if you don't get any help.
[alarm bell ringing] [men continue grunting] Stop! Stop! Turn it off! Stop! You all right? Ease off.
Thank you.
Thank you.
Any time, ma'am.
Nice to be of service.
It was our pleasure.
Are you all right? I'm all right.
I'm all right.
You all right? They beat up Vic pretty bad.
I better go help him.
You all right? I'm all right.
[siren wailing] After you dropped me off, Vic Whelan was asleep in the bed, so I figured why bug him, so I slept on the couch.
All of a sudden, all hell broke loose in the bedroom.
Commissioner, excuse me, but George Harvard made bail.
Naturally.
Put a tail on him? Naturally.
Oh and Vic Whelan tried to phone you a little over an hour ago.
I wonder why.
Well, the way I figure it is that those four guys went after Billy, got Whelan by mistake, probably to ensure a bet of $75,000.
Doctor, could we see him? I'm sorry, Commissioner.
Whelan's condition is critical.
You can't talk to him now.
It may take 24 to 48 hours.
If there's a change, let me know.
Of course.
Thank you.
Billy.
Looks like you're the Hawks' only quarterback now.
Without you, they haven't got a game.
Now I guess you'll find out if I'm on the level or not.
Yeah, I guess we will.
Here's another thing to think about: Whoever placed that bet intends to win.
So, if you are on the level, you're in the way.
No word on those men who beat up Whelan? Well, keep trying.
How many men can we spare this afternoon? All right, I want double that number and walkie-talkies.
I want two men on each bench, one man acting as lineman, one man in the locker room and at least 50 men in the stands.
Right.
Enright's meeting us at the field.
I hate to see you so worried.
Oh.
Do you think it's going to be cold? Kind of.
That cold? This cold.
Got you.
[crowd chattering] [crowd applauding] (Lowball on radio) After I made Sergeant, I trained recruits, trained them in military courtesy tactics, marksmanship.
I was the best shot in my unit with a rifle or a pistol.
Kids really eat that up.
Then, after that, I kind of knocked around until-- (Sandy) I'm sorry, Lowball, but that's all the time we have left in the pre-game show.
[phone buzzing] Folks this is Sandy King, we'll be right back to kickoff after a word from our sponsor.
Car one.
Anyone named McMillan here? We both are.
McMillan.
Y es.
Right, thank you, Doctor.
Vic Whelan's conscious, says he wants to talk to me.
Says it's important.
Bayview Hospital, Brady.
Mind missing the kickoff? Yes.
Do I have a choice? Nope.
Then I don't mind.
[referee blowing whistle] [crowd cheering] (Sandy) It's a long end-over-end and the ball is taken by Woods on the 15.
He runs it back and is downed on the 29 yard line.
[crowd cheering] Billy Benton brings the Hawks out of the huddle for the first offensive play of the game.
Down.
Eight, seven, six, hut.
Hut.
[crowd continues cheering] Ladies and gentlemen, it's unbelievable! On the first offensive play of the game, Billy Benton faded back for a pass, unexplainably stumbled and threw a soft blooper about 1 0 feet into the air.
It was intercepted by Bob Ridgely who ran it all the way for a touchdown after only 54 seconds of play.
It's 6-0, Drillers.
Come on, Billy.
Ssh.
Hello, Vic.
Hi.
It was Lowball, Commissioner, who put the gun in my locker.
Why didn't you tell me that before? I figured if Lowball wanted to kill Sandy King, it was his business.
Sandy's a bum.
He'd kill his mother to get at story.
Anything to keep his job.
When Billy got involved, I tried to reach you but then those guys busted in on me.
Why did you tell me you were married? I moved in with Billy because I was worried about the rumors.
I wanted to help him.
I really don't know why those guys had it in for me.
What makes you think they were after you? They said my name.
Does Billy usually fall asleep when he gets a massage? With Lowball, we all do.
Anything else? How's the game going? Here.
Got it? The doc said no excitement and I'm not listening.
To the game? To the doc.
Good boy.
Hope you feel better, Vic.
Thanks, Vic.
(Sandy) Billy Benton fading back for the pass.
We have been operating on the wrong premise.
They wanted to get rid of the backup quarterback before the game.
And get rid of Billy during the game.
[crowd cheering] [referee shouting] [referee blowing whistle] (Sandy) And Benton brings his team out for third down and one with four to go.
[players chattering] He's fading back to pass [crowd booing] Have you been listening to the game, Brady? Y es, sir.
Billy's playing the worst game of his career.
He made two fumbles and we're being clobbered.
You see, Sally.
Step on it, Brady.
Why did you ask about Billy sleeping on the table, Mac? Because I think that's how Lowball put Billy's fingerprints on that gun.
Then he's innocent.
Maybe.
Maybe not.
He's playing so badly it looks like he's throwing the game.
Enright? I want Lowball arrested for the attempted murder of Sandy King.
Yes, I know the game looks bad.
I'll see you later.
[referee shouting] (Sandy) Hawks are over the ball.
Benton's calling signals now.
He's fading back, back, he stepped out of the pocket! He's down for a seven yard loss.
Th is is certai n ly not Billy Benton's day.
With a score of 1 0-0, the Hawks are being outplayed in every department.
Statistically, in yardage, passes, recovered fumbles, it's the Drillers' game all the way.
Well, Billy's two-for-1 7, one for no gain.
Halftime is coming up.
He can't be throwing the game, Mac.
He just can't be.
Come on, Commissioner.
You know what it is.
Nerves.
I'm tight, tense.
We're down by 10.
That's nothin'.
We'll score two touchdowns.
We'll get 'em in the second half.
I've got myself all together.
I feel great.
Commissioner, Lowball's missing.
Anybody here see Lowball Lewis? He came in at the start of the half.
Yeah, but I haven't seen him since.
Hey, Commissioner, I got to talk to the team.
The halftime show is almost finished and I'm running out of time.
Now, how about it? Go ahead.
Alert all the men in the stadium.
I believe Billy.
I believe he's playing it straight.
I believe he wants to win.
So whoever's maneuvered all this is set for the last part of his plan.
Getting rid of Billy.
[crowd cheering] It's one minute and 20 seconds into the second half.
The Drillers have the ball on third down and 1 0.
[referee shouting] The ball goes to Mason, sweeping the weak side.
It's very close to a first down.
Personally, I don't think he made it.
[chattering] I hear you, sir.
Everyone in position.
Roger.
(Sandy) The score is still 10-0.
Drillers, and they're about two inches short of a first down.
It looks like they' re going to go for it! [crowd chanting] [referee shouting] The ball goes to Mason again [chattering] right into the middle of the line and I don't think he made it.
And that's the ball for the Hawks-- Henderson, get down closer to the field.
Would you be careful, Billy? I got 10 other men.
I got to go.
Good luck.
[crowd cheering] Hi, you guys.
How you doing? You haven't got any water.
Wait a minute.
[sighing] Here you go.
How is that? Two, 42, set, hut! [referee blowing whistle] [shouting] [crowd chanting] Set, hut.
Hut.
Touchdown.
That's the way, Billy, you can do it.
One contest is raging there, as we like to say with a new Billy Benton fighting hard.
He has recovered from that somewhat uncoordinated first half and has been playing some really heads-up football.
These last eight minutes, he has done beautifully.
[crowd roaring] Set, hut, hut! First and 1 0.
Do it again, Billy.
[referee shouting] [crowd booing] Where's your blocking? Billy! Billy! Billy! Wait a minute, someone's running out onto the field, a young lady I can't make out who it is.
Ladies and gentlemen, it's crazy, but a young lady has-- That's no lady, that's my wife.
[chattering] [referee blowing whistle] You got to stop playing.
You've got to see a doctor.
What are you doing? Billy, you got to see a doctor.
Come on.
(Sandy) Ladies and gentlemen, we don't know what happened yet.
But a young lady did run on the field and it appears Billy Benton was stricken while playing.
They' re carrying him off the field now.
What a tragedy for the Hawks.
[siren wailing] I saw Billy drinking out of the team water bottle.
So, a little later, I was looking at the hawks and they looked thirsty, so I gave them some water from the same bottle.
Mac, when I went back to my seat and looked at the hawks, they were dead.
Enright! Billy was poisoned.
Find that bottle immediately and get it to hospital, they might come up with an antidote.
See if any other players drank out of that bottle.
Henderson, I want the names and addresses of the team.
I want every one of them questioned.
I mean everyone.
Hang on, they'll do all they can.
I got along this far.
I'm sure I'll be fine.
And that's the way it ended, ladies and gentlemen, with the Hawks losing 24-17.
I just had word that Billy Benton is in the hospital.
This reporter will bring you bulletins on his condition as they come in.
This is Sandy King closing his post-game show on a blue day.
Signing off now from Redwood Field.
(Sally) How is he, Doctor? (doctor) Are you a fan? I sure am.
I think the antidote is going to work.
[beeping] An hour ago there were 65,000 people there, cheering and roaring and having a good time.
They don't care who lives or dies, Mac, they don't care who gets hurt.
None of them knew what happened, Sally.
If they did, I'm sure a lot of them would care.
I know, I guess you're right.
[phone buzzing] It's just that Billy is so terrific.
McMillan.
Right, the barber shop.
George Harvard's been found dead.
Commissioner.
He was shot from the front at close range and that's all we know.
Anyone hear the shot? Any witnesses? Not that we know of.
But we did find this.
Why are you handling it? We've examined it, sir, and no fingerprints.
Oh.
It's a marker.
Yes, sir.
$75,000.
Whoever it was, collected his bet then killed Harvard so he couldn't be identified.
All right, check the whereabouts of every known suspect at the time of death.
Right, sir.
I'll make you something to eat.
You'll feel better.
I'm not hungry.
You haven't even heard my offer.
A melted cheese sandwich with bacon and hot vodka bouillon.
Egg sandwich.
Egg sandwich.
Brown bread? Kaiser.
You've got it.
Can't put it together.
You don't have to.
I am doing it.
It's not that.
Oh, well, we don't know who placed the bet, so we can't start there.
We don't know who killed Whizzer or Harvard, so we can't start there.
Let's start here.
No kaiser.
Whole wheat.
No whole wheat.
Brown bread.
Brown bread, you've got it.
We don't know why Lowball wanted to kill Sandy unless he's some kind of a nut and wanted to kill anybody.
I don't think that.
I don't, either.
Harlan Royce, maybe.
Sandy, maybe? Timber, maybe? Rye? Maybe.
Vic Whelan, maybe? No, that's impossible.
He was in the hospital.
It doesn't make sense.
Let's start at the beginning.
Good idea.
Lowball found Whizzer's body.
If he were in on it, he'd try to conceal the body, wouldn't he? Well, Mac, maybe things don't look like or sound Iike what they look like or sound like.
[phone ringing] Billy! Relax.
I am relaxed.
Do you always put the eggs in the sink and the shells in the bowl? Doesn't everyone? Well, I don't.
Your mother does.
Hello? Yes, this is he.
I see.
Okay, thank you very much.
Billy.
He's going to be all right, and you saved him.
Wait a minute.
Look like.
Sound like.
Sally, I think you're onto something.
Lowball That tape interview.
Come on.
What tape interview? (Lowball) and after that, I kind of knocked around until (Mac) This is the one we wanted, thanks, Jimmy.
(Jimmy) Good, Commissioner.
I've got to go watch the gate.
When you're ready to leave, let me know and I'll be there.
Fine.
See you later.
I want to hear this one again.
[tape rewinding] (Lowball) Well, after I made Sergeant, I trained recruits, trained them in military courtesy, tactics, marksmanship.
I was the best shot in my unit with a rifle or a pistol-- (Mac) That's it.
(Sal ly) What's it? The g uy's a crack shot.
When he shot at Sandy, he missed.
Right.
A crack shot only misses when he's supposed to miss.
Why bother shooting if you're gonna miss.
To frame somebody else.
Like Billy.
(Sally) To have him arrested.
Taken out of the game.
Who hired the guys to beat up on Vic? The same guy who arranged the frame.
And who killed Whizzer because Whizzer must have found out who he was after he placed the bet.
Police emergency, this is Commissioner McMillan.
Sgt.
Enright, please.
Try the lab.
Enright! I'm glad I found you.
No, I'm at the stadium.
Look, pick up Sandy King.
Suspicion of murder.
Let's go home and I'll make you some dinner.
What do you got? Well, anything but eggs.
[laughs] [gun firing] [screaming] Sally! Run.
Run! Who's walking? [gun firing] (Mac) Take cover in that tunnel, I'll try and draw his fire.
[gun firing] [panting] Mac! [screams] I think I must have the wrong floor.
Going up? I think there's something wrong with this elevator.
[both grunting] [police siren wailing] (Enright) You all right? Sure.
I'm sorry we are late, sir, the gate was locked.
Next time, sir, you should let me go after the bad guys and you stay with the good guys.
Yes, Sergeant, we'll have to work that out.
Here.
Are you okay? I'm okay.
You all right? Uh-huh.
Commissioner, one of our men found Lowball down at the railroad yard and he was very drunk.
He said he missed on purpose when he took that shot.
Oh, yeah? You mean you had that figured out? No, Sally did.
Oh.
Well, maybe you can tell me why Sandy King acted the way he did.
Sure, um You know, I bet Mac could tell you better.
Sandy King was afraid for his life.
He bet $75,000 against the syndicate and see what happens.
It's kill or be killed.
He didn't have the money to pay off.
He was desperate about his job.
That's what Whizzer found out.
That's why Whizzer's dead.
Let's go home.
Let's go home.
Looks like it's out of order.
How do you like that.
I feel terrific.
I feel terrific, too.
I don't feel too bad myself.
And I know I'll be ready for next week's game.
As we wrap this up, Billy, what about the Hawks' chances for the rest of the season? Oh, win or lose, I think the Hawks are a dynamite team.
What I've been through, I'll be on top of it now.
I owe my life to two very beautiful people.
You mean Commissioner and Mrs.
McMillan? Right on.
They know how I feel about 'em.
Good night, Sally.
Good night, Mac.
Good night, Billy.
Good night, Billy.
Good night, Sally.
Good night, Mac.