Queer Eye (2018) s04e00 Episode Script

Queer Eye: We're In Japan!

1 ["DREAM LIFE AUTOMATIC" PLAYING.]
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["ALL THINGS (JUST KEEP GETTING BETTER)" PLAYING.]
Oh, my God! [JONATHAN.]
Konnichiwa! Hey, boys! - Hi.
- Welcome to Tokyo! [THEME SONG PLAYING.]
[MUSIC ENDS.]
[UPLIFTING MUSIC PLAYING.]
Oh, yeah! - Oh, Kiko, you've already ordered for us? - Arigato gozaimasu.
- Yes! - Arigato gozaimasu.
I've been studying so this is Can you guys handle the wasabi? - Scallop is hotate? - Hotate! - Chu-toro? - Chu-toro? - Kinmedai? - Kinmedai! - Wow! - Kinmedai.
- You're nailing your vocabulary.
- I know.
- Saamen is salmon.
- Saamon.
[LAUGHS.]
I think we've all been so excited to get here and experience the culture in Japan and it's been so eye-opening and so cute and so fun and I cannot wait to roll up our gorgeous little gay sleeves and get this ball rolling and we are first here.
I mean, we gotta get our makeover lives together, right? - So, her name is Yoko Sakuma.
- Yeah? [LAUGHS.]
Do we call her "Yoko-san" or no? Oh, Yoko-san is, I think, better.
- Okay, good.
- "San" is respect.
"She was nominated by her friend Fumiko.
" - [JONATHAN.]
Gorgeous.
- "Her profession is hospice nurse.
" - Oh! - Aw.
"She has no children.
She's divorced.
She's 57 and she dreams of falling in love one day.
" - [GASPS.]
- Aw.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Your pointy hat is funny.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes.
[LAUGHS.]
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
I just came from a mountain.
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Yoko-san is an offbeat nurse.
Always joking around.
She's fun to be with.
She's always making people laugh.
She's not what you would expect a nurse to be.
Tada-tada! [IN JAPANESE.]
One step, two step, three step.
The place I manage, called Nurse Sakuma's House is like a residential hospice.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Hello.
- Oh, hello! - How are you? [FUMIKO.]
The reason why I nominated Yoko-san is that she is an adventurer, but since she started the Sakuma House, she's used all her time trying to make everyone else happy.
She still has many years to live, and I'd like her to come back as an adventurer.
Yoko gave up every room in her home for her patients, - including her own bedroom.
- Wow! Where does she sleep? [YOKO IN JAPANESE.]
I often sleep in front of the door of someone who is very sick.
Or I sleep in a sleeping bag under the living room table.
[FUMIKO IN JAPANESE.]
Right now, her hair is very messy.
So she's wearing a hat to hide it.
She really doesn't take care of herself.
I'm sure she bathes, but [IN JAPANESE.]
Sometimes I won't bathe for three days.
I mean, it won't kill me, right? Sometimes, my clothes, too, I go, "When was the last time I changed?" [IN JAPANESE.]
She abandons her own private life to take care of those at the Sakuma House.
She can't seem to separate herself from her work.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I opened this house because of my sister's death.
My sister died in a hospital.
I think she might have wanted to go home, or that she must have been so lonely [WEEPING.]
being in the hospital at night, [SNIFFS.]
all by herself.
So, I don't want my patients to go through that same thing.
Can you go like this? Your hands are a bit shaky.
Okay, that's fine.
Thank you.
[FUMIKO IN JAPANESE.]
She claims that she's abandoned being a woman.
But she can still shine if she'd polish herself a little.
But that's, like, a big thing here, right? The idea of, like, giving up on being a woman? Yes, in Japanese, we say onna wo suteru.
And lots of women are pressured by how they have to look.
So they would just, like, make fun of themselves and they would say, like, "Oh, I gave up on being a woman", - like, they're just kind of just them - Feel okay.
- feel okay.
- Exactly.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I want to get back in touch with myself.
If I could dress like Audrey Hepburn, that would be wonderful.
[LAUGHS.]
"She's having a party introducing the neighborhood to the Kumachan House, a community center, which is next door to the hospice house.
" - What's Kumachan mean? - Bear.
- Oh! - But actually, her name is Sakuma, right? - So Sakuma, Kuma-chan.
- Ah! Oh! Sakuma! Oh, that's cute.
[YOKO IN JAPANESE.]
The reason why I started Kumachan House was because I wanted a place where people of all ages could spend time together.
Here you go! I wanted to do something fun for them.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Most people don't know about Kumachan House.
She already has her hands full, so she hasn't gotten to a point of doing something about it.
- Some cultural stuff, real quick.
- Uh-huh.
Do we hug her? Do we take our shoes off? Like, what do we need to know? Okay, you guys have to take your shoes off, - but please hug her.
- Okay.
With big love.
So, our mission this week, is all about teaching this selfless nurse to put herself first.
- Yes! [CHEERING.]
- Yeah! DAY ONE THE ME WHO GAVE UP ON BEING A WOMAN - [KARAMO.]
We're here, guys.
- Yay.
[SHUSHES.]
KUMACHAN HOUSE Knock, knock.
Konnichiwa.
- Hi! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Hi, nice to meet you.
Come here.
Konnichiwa.
It's so nice to meet you! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Ah, hello.
[LAUGHS.]
- Konnichiwa.
- Nice to meet you! Konnichiwa.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Hello! [LAUGHS.]
So, how are you feeling? [IN JAPANESE.]
This is amazing.
I feel like my heart is going to burst.
- Are you nervous? - [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes, of course.
Of course.
Is it because they're so tall? [IN JAPANESE.]
You're so individualistic and unique.
[CHUCKLES.]
- [LAUGHS.]
- You jumped out of nowhere.
It was such a surprise! - Aw! - [LAUGHS.]
[TAN.]
Real quick.
Can I look through anything? Okay, okay.
[COUGHS.]
[WHISPERING.]
I don't even know what this is.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Ah! [LAUGHING.]
Cute! [LAUGHS.]
You know I don't really put things on my head, but what's this all about? Jackie, I found a wig! You're gorgeous! [CHEERING.]
You always wanted me to have the latest fashion trend on-the-go! - Yeah! [LAUGHS.]
- Pretty! Yeah! [JONATHAN.]
So pretty! What's this for, Yoko? [IN JAPANESE.]
I like things, costumes and things.
[TAN.]
Yoko's got a bunch of wigs.
Some of them are bat-ish crazy.
Some of them are really cutesy.
- Hey, baby, do I look pretty to you? - [LAUGHS.]
- They look really pretty, sweetie.
- [LAUGHS.]
Japan suits me very well as you can see.
[LAUGHS HYSTERICALLY.]
Do you ever prepare meals for yourself in this kitchen? [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes, I do sometimes.
Like myself for example, I have microwavable food.
Microwave spaghetti.
What's the thing that gets you excited with food? [IN JAPANESE.]
I did have a dream of being this mom and making yummy apple pies.
I think that's really nice.
- Do you wanna make one with me? - [LAUGHS.]
- Please.
- Perfect.
Wow! We're going to make the most beautiful apple pie.
Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
If you make it, it will be the best apple pie in the world.
[LAUGHS.]
No pressure for me.
[LAUGHS.]
Whilst you ruminate on that pressure, can I steal her away? Absolutely.
I wanna know why there's so many different types of soy sauce in this fridge.
And I wanna find out why there are so many costumes.
Ciao! These boys are a lot of energy.
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's like going to a disco in the old days.
It's fun! [LAUGHS.]
Uh-huh.
You're right.
They are old men.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Let's talk about why you have so many costumes.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I love cosplay I just love silly things.
Okay, so then my question is you seem to be so joyful in your cosplay but your closet is the complete opposite of playful.
[IN JAPANESE.]
When I choose clothing, it's always big, baggy, and affordable.
Tell me what you think of your body, because you like big clothes.
[IN JAPANESE.]
My weight is above the average weight.
[LAUGHING.]
I don't really have much of a waist.
So my body doesn't have that hourglass figure like a woman.
I am going to challenge you.
Because I don't believe that you don't have a waist.
if you had no waist, when I do this all you would see is flat.
[LAUGHS.]
But when I do this I actually do see a waist.
You just You haven't found it.
So, I hear that you like Audrey Hepburn.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
So pretty, so pretty! - [JAZZ MUSIC PLAYS.]
The first film I saw was Roman Holiday I started to like her more and more.
So, sophisticated, elegant, beautiful.
- Mmm.
- Okay.
Tell me when was the last time you saw her in something like this.
Never? No.
Yoko-san, I have so much respect for you, but I can't save any of it.
[UPLIFTING MUSIC PLAYS.]
- Time.
Gotta go.
- [LAUGHS.]
- [JONATHAN.]
Wow.
- There are literally 200 sake cups here.
She has a very healthy love of sake.
She ain't ashamed.
- I love that.
- [ANTONI.]
Hey, Tannie, are you hungry? - [CLINKING DISHES.]
- [TAN.]
Always.
Okay, throw it in.
Which one of these settings do you think is appropriate? - [ANTONI.]
Oh, I think it's this one.
- That looks like spaghetti to me.
All right.
Here we go.
[BEEPING.]
Shut up.
This space back here, it's Your closet's back there, but what else is it used for really? [IN JAPANESE.]
Ah, I also bask in the sun here.
So out here.
[BOBBY AND YOKO LAUGH.]
I want to hear a little bit from you about how you use the space.
[IN JAPANESE.]
This space is for the community center for the neighborhood.
For example drinking sake at night, events for children, and there's even a soccer class, too.
I don't see really any space for you.
[IN JAPANESE.]
At first, I had my own room.
But it got full so I don't have my own room right now.
So where do you sleep? [IN JAPANESE.]
In the house next door for example, under the table.
[LAUGHS.]
Sometimes in the hallway.
That doesn't sound very comfortable.
- No good.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Yup, the next one done.
- Yup.
- Uh-huh.
- Yep.
I mean, that looks good to me.
- Okay.
- Good to go.
- [BEEPING.]
- What is going on? You If you keep on pressing the same thing every single time - [LAUGHS.]
- why do you think suddenly it's gonna turn on? [JONATHAN.]
Come on, let's go in your bathroom.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Here we are.
- Girl, there's no mirror in here.
- [LAUGHS.]
- That's my mirror! - It's tiny.
- No! You need both hands.
- [LAUGHS.]
[JONATHAN.]
Yoko has a gajillion sake cups, but you know what she doesn't have one of? A mirror bigger than like this What happens in here in the morning? [IN JAPANESE.]
In the morning, I use this.
I'm bad at washing my face with water, so in the morning I take this out and I just wipe my face.
And then how much time will you spend styling your hair? [IN JAPANESE.]
Style say one minute.
If you could give me, like, 10, 15 minutes in the morning I think it could just make you see yourself the way I see you.
Have you ever looked in the mirror and thought that you were beautiful? Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Not really.
I have a big nose.
Someone once told me I look like a dog.
You have a beautiful nose and it isn't No.
No.
Your face is beautiful.
[MELANCHOLIC MUSIC PLAYS.]
I in my life have had so many people call me terrible things, but I never believed them because I know in my heart how beautiful I am.
So, we need to find how you'll feel beautiful.
Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I want to feel that way.
[LAUGHS.]
So, I am so excited to finally talk to you.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Me too.
- [CHUCKLES.]
The hospice house is something that is really amazing.
Can you tell me how you started it? [IN JAPANESE.]
My sister was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer And [CRIES.]
She went to the ICU and was on life support.
She had about eight different tubes attached to her.
[CRIES.]
And she died like that and I really I really regret that.
I believed that with this house, people can pass on peacefully while being surrounded by family and friends.
Wow, that is really beautiful.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Yesterday, an elderly patient passed away and so I've seen these peaceful deaths, and just that alone seeing that alone I get satisfaction and happiness from it.
Well, when you give so much joy to other people, you deserve to get joy yourself.
Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I never thought of it that way.
I thought things are fine as is.
Mmm.
I want to see how we can bring a lot more joy into your life [IN JAPANESE.]
Mmm.
I want to have fun.
You and I, we're gonna have fun together.
[LAUGH.]
- Hello! - Hi! Hi! [CHEERING.]
Hi! [IN JAPANESE.]
Hi! My name is Fumiko.
Hi! [LAUGHING.]
[CHEERING.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Hi, look at you! Thank you! [IN JAPANESE.]
You're so cold.
I'm okay, I'm fine.
You should use this.
Oh, thank you, thank you.
Good for you.
Good for you.
So, you know all the dirt on Yoko.
So tell us you favorite thing about her.
Or what's the naughtiest thing she's ever done? [IN JAPANESE.]
Well, one thing I can't forget is - [SHUSHES.]
- [LAUGH.]
- Hm? Um, it's - [SHUSHES.]
Why did you nominate her? What do you think needs to change? [IN JAPANESE.]
I wanted to change the flow of energy around her.
We're gonna teach you how to harness that energy and turn it inward so you can love on yourself.
I want you to see you and be like, "Yas, queen.
I'm feeling myself.
" [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's nice to be told that I need to love myself.
I realized that this has been missing from my life.
I'm so glad you guys are here.
It's longer with you.
- Yas! - [LAUGHS.]
DAY TWO TAKING THAT FIRST STEP [KARAMO.]
I love that Yoko brings others joy, but she needs to realize that she deserves the same joy as well.
[ANTONI.]
No, it's not possible to make a meal from scratch every single day.
But I want to teach her that it's actually very simple to make something that's special that takes a little bit of care.
[TAN.]
I want to take Yoko to the point where she finally looks at herself differently.
I want her to see herself as a woman again.
[BOBBY.]
My goal for Yoko this week is to give her a space where the community can come, where class is gonna happen, cooking, all kinds of things that can really bring the community together.
[JONATHAN.]
She just has been caring for people so much that she hasn't really even have that moment to realize everything that she has to offer herself.
- All right, Kiko.
- Yes.
- We almost set up, my love? - Uh-huh.
I wanted to bring Kiko here with me today, because she loves fashion as much as I do.
She's a model.
She can add the Japanese perspective.
We just need to encourage Yoko to be more playful with her fashion.
I wanna show what a surprise I have for you.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Yes.
[CHUCKLES.]
After you, thank you.
- Thank you.
- Okay.
Uh, Yoko [IN JAPANESE.]
Oh? Hello.
This is my friend Kiko.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I'm honored to meet you, I'm Kiko.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Wow, you are? She's always on TV.
- Yes, I am.
- Hi! - Nice to meet you.
[LAUGHS.]
- Nice to meet you.
Why is she here? Look how joyful she is.
I want her to bring out that joy in you.
Wow! I want to give Yoko a beautiful experience so she feels like a movie star.
Audrey Hepburn.
We've got an incredible suite and I want Yoko to try on clothes that has been specially curated for her.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Sorry, I was just staring at my daifuku mochi.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Right, doesn't it look good? Do you have a sweet tooth? [IN JAPANESE.]
I love sweets.
- Daisuki.
Love.
- Mm.
I could live my whole life with just sweet things.
Yoko-san, what do you wanna look like? Like, I know you love Audrey Hepburn.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I want to wear colors that suit me.
But if women my age stand out a lot of people view it in a bad way.
- Okay.
Okay.
- Yes.
I don't understand this.
Kiko, you know more about this than I ever will.
Can you explain why you think this is an issue? [IN JAPANESE.]
So for Japanese women if you're not stylish in the conventional sense people will say you've given up on being a woman.
And sadly, it's something you hear a lot.
I want to enjoy all types of fashion not as a woman, but as a person.
[IN JAPANESE.]
When it comes to models and actresses, they're different than us regular, normal people.
So they can do what they do.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I do get beat down.
People might make fun of my ponytails.
- [LAUGHS.]
- But I'm able to have fun and enjoy myself to the fullest with hair like this and colorful clothes.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I think for myself my biggest goal for now, would be able to feel free and open.
If you're doing something that is authentically you, that you feel that you Will make you happy, we're gonna do it.
And maybe you'll be a trailblazer.
Self-esteem building starts now.
- Yes! - Yes, queen! Yes, queen! - [CHEERING.]
- [UPBEAT MUSIC PLAYING.]
Yes, queen! I want to remind Yoko of what it feels like to look in the mirror and think, "I look beautiful.
I look confident.
I feel good about myself.
" And I know that her wardrobe can help facilitate this.
You can a wear a top that is still nice.
It's still feminine.
You said that you like looser and comfortable, well, this is looser and comfortable, but it's a more stylish version.
You had a few dresses in your wardrobe that were kind of a similar shape to this.
But if you did it in a version that was a little more classic, a little more feminine, you might feel better than you do in the other big dresses that you have.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
It's cute.
- Kawaii.
- It is.
You're right.
Let's try it on.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Yoko-san? You ready? - [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes.
[IN JAPANESE.]
[GASPS.]
Wow! You look amazing! [LAUGHS.]
Is it hard to walk in these heels? [IN JAPANESE.]
It's a little hard.
Yeah.
Okay.
You will learn over time.
This is for, like, a fancy occasion.
How do you feel? [IN JAPANESE.]
I feel like Audrey Hepburn! When I first saw the clothes, the length was short and it's a bit of a slim fit, so I was worried whether I would even look good in it.
But now that I'm wearing it, I think I look pretty good.
[LAUGHS.]
Just the expression, changed so much.
- That's the power of fashion.
Yes.
- Yeah, 100 percent.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I want to wear so many different types of clothing now! [TAN.]
Let's get you changed.
- Kiko? - Yes? We've got a new woman with us.
- [CHEERING.]
Wow! - [CHUCKLES.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
You look amazing! Incredible! - [IN JAPANESE.]
How do I look? - [LAUGH.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
This will look great everyday.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I think I look pretty! [LAUGHS.]
[TAN.]
Yes, you do.
The proportions of this outfit make her look taller than she is.
The outfit is perfect.
She looks graceful and most importantly, elegant.
- [CHEERING.]
Yeah! - Yes! Yes! - Yes! - [LAUGHS.]
Yeah! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Step, step.
- Oh, yes! [LAUGHS.]
Yeah.
This place has so much old Japanese charm, but it's not really conducive to a community center.
There's not a lot of space.
It's not really open.
We need to make this more warm and inviting and a place that's comfortable for the community.
Yoko-san and Antoni's date Yoko-san and Antoni's date - [GASPS.]
Oh! - Look, a bakery! - Thank you.
- After you.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Hello.
- Konnichiwa.
- Konnichiwa.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Welcome.
- I brought you to a very special bakery - [UPBEAT GUITAR MUSIC PLAYS.]
so that we can make a little apple pie together.
Would you like that? - [IN JAPANESE.]
Let's do it! - Good.
Yoko's already so passionate about dressing up in costumes.
This is a creative person.
I want her to tap into food as well.
Even though apple pie is something that's very traditionally American, there's a version of it that the French have, and it's called tarte tatin.
- Have you ever heard of this before? - Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
No.
Because we're in Japan, I wanna honor one of the most important ingredients here, my favorite apple, the Fuji apple.
Mmm.
[JAPANESE MUSIC PLAYING.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
When I was a kid, it was like every household ate cakes.
So, this is something that's special? [IN JAPANESE.]
For me it's like a taste of happiness.
That's very poetic.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Mr.
Antoni, what is your taste of happiness? I think making food for other people and teaching them how to make food.
It's nice to connect to other people.
Have you ever made caramel before? [IN JAPANESE.]
No, I have not.
So we take some butter.
[IN JAPANESE.]
So much butter! [LAUGHS.]
I love butter.
[IN JAPANESE.]
But you're so skinny.
You're so slim.
[MUSIC PAUSES SUDDENLY.]
- Thank you.
- [LAUGHS.]
[MUSIC RESUMES.]
[ANTONI.]
The same amount of butter, we're gonna put sugar.
- Your turn.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Okay.
Move it around gently just so that it all sort of incorporates.
Yeah.
[IN JAPANESE.]
In Japan, we say put love into it when you cook.
It's the secret ingredient.
Yoko-san makes my heart go pitter-patter.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Hm, what is that? Um cinnamon? - Cinnamon.
- [CHUCKLES.]
So, now you sprinkle this on top.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Papapa? - What's a "papapa"? - [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Well it's that little pop.
Can I show you how I "papapa"? [CHUCKLES.]
Oh.
- Papapapapa - [LAUGHS.]
[ANTONI.]
Perfect.
- Great.
- Mmm.
When's the last time you went out on a date? [IN JAPANESE.]
Uh, ten years ago.
Ten years ago.
That's a long time.
It's hard, though, because you're taking care of people, but the price of that is, like, what about Yoko-san? I really hope that you see, with everything that you get to experience with us this week, like, how important having fun is, because I think you know more than most people how precious life is.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you so much.
The best part about making apple pie is the time when it's in the oven, so you actually get to have a little conversation.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Right? And you're gonna leave it out right on here.
- One, two, three, flip! - Oh! Ah! - Ah! It's a little - [GASPS.]
You did it! [IN JAPANESE.]
Oh! I did it! Oh! [IN JAPANESE.]
It looks delicious! So pretty.
[YOKO.]
Don't you want more? - Okay.
- [LAUGHS.]
And I like a little bit of mint on mine.
May I feed you? [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes, please.
- Let me just [LAUGHS.]
- [LAUGHS.]
[LAUGHING.]
excuse me a little Mmhmm.
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's sweet, it's bittersweet, it's cold.
It's so good! [CACKLES.]
[LAUGHS.]
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Your eyes are so lovely, Antoni.
- Kirei na me? - Your eyes are lovely.
- Oh! [LAUGHS.]
- Mmm.
- Just you and me.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Just you and me, baby.
- [LAUGHS.]
[LAUGH.]
["THE FOUR SEASONS" PLAYING.]
DAY THREE A FRESH STAR [UPBEAT DANCE MUSIC PLAYING.]
- Here? - Here.
We're gonna have some gelato.
Oh, thank you.
[KARAMO.]
All right.
So, pick a flavor.
Hazelnut.
Here you go.
[IN JAPANESE.]
What, are you paying? [KARAMO.]
You always pay for pretty ladies in America.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Always.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Amazing.
[LAUGHS.]
So, what I love most about you is your beautiful big spirit.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you.
- Thank you.
[CHUCKLES.]
- Yes, you're welcome.
When you were younger, what did you wish for in life? When I was younger, I wanted to be a mother.
Lots and lots of kids.
- Yeah.
- Yes.
Did your sister have a lot of kids? [IN JAPANESE.]
Two boys.
Two boys.
Do you get to still speak with them? [IN JAPANESE.]
After my sister's death, we drifted apart.
I do talk to them maybe once a year, but not so much.
[MELANCHOLIC MUSIC PLAYS.]
Why did you drift apart? [IN JAPANESE.]
I had a disagreement with my sister's husband on how my sister was being treated in the hospital.
The relationship got sour.
That has to be hard for you.
- Mmhmm.
- Yeah.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I was single at the time.
Because she had to raise her kids, I wanted her to survive.
In exchange for her life, I really wanted to die.
But my wish didn't come true.
In a sense, I felt like my life ended there.
[MUSIC FADES OUT.]
A lot of times when people we love pass away, we have a lot of guilt.
"Maybe their life was more important than my own life.
I should've helped them more.
" And it causes us to feel a lot of pain and hurt.
[CALM PIANO MUSIC PLAYS.]
Is that how you are feeling? [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes, I do.
But the thing is, you did the best you can do.
You have to live for yourself.
Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I don't know Even though your sister had certain things that you thought were more valuable, that doesn't mean that your life was any less valuable.
You do such great work.
Your sister, she would be very proud of what you've done here.
Mmm.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I feel like I'm starting to understand a little bit.
- Yeah.
- Yes.
So, you have to forgive yourself.
Mmm.
[UPLIFTING MUSIC PLAYS.]
So, can you say, "I forgive myself"? [IN JAPANESE.]
I forgive myself! I did everything that I could.
And my life has value.
- Mmm.
- Yes.
- Yes.
- [SOBS.]
- It's all right.
- [SOBS.]
[CRIES.]
[WEEPING.]
Thank you.
[SOBS.]
[CRIES.]
[SNIFFS.]
[SIGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you.
- Yes.
Of course.
- [CRIES.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
I'm sorry I keep crying.
- It's okay.
- [LAUGHS.]
You cry, and then eat gelato.
Mmm.
So, I have a bit of surprise for you.
You and I are gonna ride that.
[CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS.]
- [IN JAPANESE.]
What? - [LAUGHS.]
You thought I was gonna come all the way to Japan and not put Yoko on one of these Vespas? [IN JAPANESE.]
You're so kind.
Especially when Roman Holiday is her favorite movie? Let's go.
[CHUCKLES.]
- [SCREAMS.]
- [LAUGHS.]
[KARAMO LAUGHS.]
[CHEERING.]
Yeah.
- [ENGINE OPERATING.]
- ["FUNICULI FUNICULA" PLAYING.]
[LAUGHS.]
- [MUSIC FADES OUT.]
- [LAUGHS.]
[UPLIFTING MUSIC PLAYING.]
Genki desuka? - [IN JAPANESE.]
I'm feeling good.
- Yeah.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Are you feeling good? - Good.
- [LAUGHS.]
Yoko is so beautiful.
Her package is soaring with great energy.
We just needed to, like, repurpose some of her energy that she already uses to shower love on everyone else, so that she can really feel some of healing energy on her insides.
There ain't no shame in that self-love game.
You have very amazing hair.
When did you have it cut last? [IN JAPANESE.]
It really depends on the time, but when I'm busy, I won't go for a year.
[IN JAPANESE.]
But I try to go at least every two months.
Every other month is good.
I think that for this length of hair, in general, every three to four months is about as long as you wanna go.
Because of the way that the head is shaped, when all this is here, it drags me back, and I wanna lift you up.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Wow, I'm excited! Because you're always doing everything for everybody else, why don't you just relax for a minute? Okay, I'm gonna give you a little facial moment.
[HUMS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
This feels like a dream.
[GASPS.]
Thank you.
You deserve it.
[SMACK LIPS.]
My stepdad, he raised me from the time I was a little boy.
He passed away in our home in hospice.
And the nurses were the most incredible, nurturing, giving people that I've ever met.
Your job is difficult.
You're helping people deal with the loss of their own life.
And if you don't have a way to kind of give yourself some love through that - Honey, my word! - [CHUCKLES.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
I'm able to think now if I take care of myself more it might make people around me happy, too.
A hundred percent.
It's all just this whole world that you haven't really gotten to play in.
Like, after a long week of work, light a candle, like, have a sake, do a face mask.
[JONATHAN.]
Do you want some sake? [IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you.
Hmm.
Tastes delicious.
Your haircut will look so good if you just wear it air dried, but I wanna show you how to style it a little bit more, like, for fun.
[CHUCKLES.]
[LAUGHS.]
Yes, yes, yes.
- Yoko don't hurt the boys, honey.
- [CHUCKLES.]
Are you ready to see it? [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes.
[IN JAPANESE.]
What! [IN JAPANESE.]
What! [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Is that me? It is.
Wow! Isn't it [CHEERING.]
cute? [IN JAPANESE.]
Wow, this is amazing! I'm cute! The bangs look like Audrey Hepburn.
- [SCREAMING.]
Yeah, right? - [LAUGHS.]
Yay! Yeah.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I was told it wouldn't be possible because of the hair texture.
Girl, you have to style it a little bit.
Kanpai.
- Whoo! - Mm.
- [CHEERING.]
Yay! [LAUGHS.]
- Yay! [CLAPS.]
Oh, so good.
[CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS.]
DAY FOUR HAPPINESS AND FORTUNE WILL COME TO THOSE WHO LAUGH [BEEPING HORN.]
- Is that Karamo? - Watch your head.
Yeah.
- [BEEPING HORN.]
- [CHEERING.]
- Hi! - Oh! - Konnichiwa, Yoko.
- Konnichiwa.
This is lovely! Oh, I love the length.
- What a great cut I did.
- Yeah.
I know that this is a tradition in Japan, [LAUGHS.]
when a new place opens.
- All right, are you ready? - [IN JAPANESE.]
Wow! [IN JAPANESE.]
Three, two, one.
[CHEERING.]
[CHEERING AND LAUGHING.]
[LAUGH.]
Come on in.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you.
Wow! - The old candy store.
- [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's so cute.
- What! - [LAUGH.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
[GASPING.]
Amazing.
I don't know what to say.
[GASPS.]
I have goosebumps.
- [LAUGHS.]
- [WEEPS.]
[GASPS.]
I can't believe it.
[BOBBY.]
I wanted to make sure I gave you some little different places.
You know, here people can gather, kids can make art.
- [LAUGHS.]
- [GASPS.]
Oh.
[BOBBY.]
You had all these closets there that weren't really good for anything, so I wanted to turn them into bookcases where you still had some storage underneath, but you also got to display things.
- [LAUGHS.]
- Your pictures of you and your sister, and your family.
I can tell you were naughty little girls even from that one picture.
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
There's just so much You're overflowing with kindness.
[GASPS.]
Ah! [CRIES.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
But I want to look more.
I want to keep looking around.
[LAUGHS.]
Yes.
[LAUGHS.]
Wah! [LAUGHS.]
Wah! Wow! [BOBBY.]
Feels so much bigger, the walls in here were all a kind of that historic sand.
I covered them up with a nice Shiplap so, that way it all flows and it makes the space feel much, much bigger.
Everything you do in your life is for other people.
So much so you that you'd given away your own bedroom.
This space is for Yoko.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
What! [LAUGHS.]
- [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
A bed! [LAUGH.]
- Wah [SNIFFS.]
- What are you thinking? [IN JAPANESE.]
I can sleep here now [CRIES.]
[SNIFFS.]
I'm sorry, I don't know what to say.
But it's lovely, so lovely.
You're all so kind and you made me happy.
You really are great Gods! - [LAUGHS.]
- Mmm.
Wah! Eh! [LAUGHS.]
- It's you and Karamo.
- [LAUGH.]
- It's us.
Yeah.
- Karamo and Yoko.
You look a little different in that picture - I know.
I tanned a little since then.
- [LAUGH.]
One last thing to show you, which to me is the most important part.
Mm.
Ah! [GASPS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Ah it's beautiful! Mmm.
This whole place is here, because of your sister.
OLIVE PEACE IN MEMORY OF NORIKO I wanted there to be a place where you can come out and you can talk to Noriko.
[CRIES.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Whenever I water these trees I'll think and remember my sister.
Thank you for creating such a beautiful space.
- Thank you very much.
- [KISS.]
Mmm.
[JONATHAN.]
Come with me.
[YOKO IN JAPANESE.]
Yes, okay.
You just woke up, I don't know what to do, so Well, this is what you do, Yoko.
I'm gonna show you.
So, you take this clip.
Clip the hair out of your face.
This is just for the eye, very little goes a long way.
So, you start more on the inside and then you blend it over to the outside.
A red lip can be a lot, so we don't wanna do too, too much.
So, take it on your finger, just for a little bit of color.
And then, you can take that leftover and you put it right on your cheek.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I can do that.
- Mm.
- Did you like? Then the last thing you do, you're gonna take out your clips, then I would just take a little bit of hairspray.
Rub it in your hands.
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's my first time seeing someone use hairspray on their hands.
You look beautiful.
[LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
I feel young again.
By doing that in the morning before you start your day with work, it just gives you an opportunity to, like, slow down and connect with yourself.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Wow.
Like The way you style my hair and I want to copy the way you move your hands.
You can Sure, use them whenever you want.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I'm feeling great! This is so fun!! [LAUGHS.]
Oh, my God! [IN JAPANESE.]
Here? [YOKO LAUGHS.]
- Kawaii.
- [LAUGHS.]
So, how much do you remember of the Tarte Tatin? [IN JAPANESE.]
I remember most of it.
I wanted to go ahead and prepare some of the ingredients for you ahead of time, so, that all you need to do is, basically, assemble and make it.
Are you gonna be okay doing that? [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes.
I will be fine.
Thank you.
Do you have any more questions for me? Do you need to use your hips when you flip it? - [LAUGH.]
- Yes.
A little with the head, we can practice.
You can just hold it and with the hip.
One, two, three Ho! One, two, three Ho! - [LAUGHS.]
- Okay.
You got this.
[LAUGHING.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
I was worried.
[TAN.]
I know you said that, you're the person that gave up on being a woman.
But you haven't and I hope that you can see that there's no reason to.
Like, you look beautiful, Yoko.
You do.
[IN JAPANESE.]
I'm feeling happier and happier.
I feel like the words you're telling me will resonate with every woman in Japan.
I love that you said that, because I want them to look to you as a shining beacon of hope, to think I could feel that way again.
I've got a surprise for you.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Are you guys ready? - [IN JAPANESE.]
Yes! - [CHEERING.]
Yeah! You have to close your eyes for a second.
Please.
Open, open, open! [LAUGH.]
Hello, Kuma-Chan.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Yay! Thank you.
- [CHEERING.]
How are you gonna do a french tuck under there? [LAUGH.]
- Wow! - [LAUGH.]
Sayonara, Kuma-Chan, watch your head.
[UPBEAT MUSIC PLAYS.]
Oh! - Hello.
- You look gorgeous.
[CHEERING.]
Yeah.
[LAUGH.]
- [ALL CHEERING.]
- [APPLAUSE.]
What do you think your friends and family will see, think when they see this? [IN JAPANESE.]
They'll be happy for me.
Aw.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Happy is "shiawase" in Japanese.
I'm happier than happy.
I can't find the words! - Thank you.
- Aww.
Oh, thank you.
Tonight is your event, where you're inviting people over to see the new you and the new place.
How are you feeling about it? [IN JAPANESE.]
Fumiko is coming.
The children and their mothers, too.
Everyone who has always supported me at this house.
I can't wait to show them the new me.
[KARAMO.]
Well, you're gonna be an example for everyone tonight.
That not only you can give and help, but you also can give to yourself.
So, to remind you that you have to take time for yourself, I got you a little gift.
- Yes.
- Mmm.
- Eh! [LAUGHS.]
- [ALL LAUGH.]
- Wow! [LAUGH.]
- [LAUGH.]
[LAUGH.]
- [SCREAMS.]
- [LAUGH.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you! I was worried about the language barrier at first.
I wondered what would happen.
But when I met the five of you You all really thought that I was such a big deal that my feelings awoke for the first time.
So maybe that's why I opened my feelings so wide, because you were the first people to open my heart.
[SNIFFS.]
The way I think about my life has changed so much.
- Thank you so much.
- Oh.
- Thank you.
- Arigato.
It's been great getting to know you, but we have to leave.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
I'll never forget you! - [CHUCKLES.]
You were all my treasures.
Aw! We love you.
[KISS.]
Mmm.
Don't forget, put that photo up.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Oh, yes.
This.
- [LAUGHS.]
[UPLIFTING MUSIC PLAYING.]
THE NEW YOKO IS HERE VERY VERY HAPPY! [TAN.]
Oh hey, Antoni.
What we got brewing? - We've got some green tea for everybody.
- Is this a pie? It's, basically, an open-faced apple tart.
- Hi.
- Hi, gorg.
- This fringe is giving me life.
- Right? - I get a little Audrey Hepburn.
- Very, very grace.
Yes.
- Oh, my God.
I wanna eat this right now.
- Is everyone hungry? [CHEERING.]
Yes.
It's so good.
- [SIGHS.]
- Oh, my skirt.
Our first viewing in Japan.
My gosh.
Kiko.
- Oh, my gosh.
- Wow.
- You do the honors.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
I wanna see.
Okay.
[CHUFFS.]
- She's changed so much.
- She changed so much.
Hi, Sakuma-san! Hey! [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
That's okay, thank you.
So beautiful! Wow! [IN JAPANESE.]
I got a haircut, too.
It looks nice! Let me walk around.
So beautiful! [LAUGH.]
This is gonna be us when we're older - [CHUCKLING.]
Yes.
- Giggling away.
[LAUGHING.]
Well this The room, too! Wha It looks amazing! Really! Right? Everybody deserves a Fumiko in their life.
I know.
What! Sakuma-san! Mm? [LAUGHS.]
Where are you going to wear these clothes? - [LAUGHS.]
- Wow! Not somewhere special.
I should wear them every day.
- That too.
- That's right.
Look at this.
Lovely color, green.
- Fumiko's gonna steal her clothes.
- [LAUGH.]
- She's going through her closet.
- Lovely, and ready for me.
[IN JAPANESE.]
When I met the Fab 5, they hugged me like this.
We rarely hugged each other before we met them but now it feels so natural.
[IN JAPANESE.]
It's really good for us.
[LAUGH.]
I really think so.
It's so nice to hug.
Hugging is great! Hugs are so nice.
Right? We've never hugged before! - [LAUGHS.]
- Wait, one more hug! [TAN.]
Oh! [LAUGHS.]
Why does kindness makes me so emotional? [IN JAPANESE.]
Here come the kids.
[YOKO LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
It really is amazing, really.
Look, look! - [TAN.]
The look of absolute shock on everyone's face.
- [ANTONI.]
I know.
Everyone is shocked.
That's my favorite.
She is stunned silent.
[IN JAPANESE.]
Your hair is so cute! [LAUGHS.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
[CHEERING.]
Thank you! [LAUGHING.]
Wait! [ALL LAUGH.]
- [IN JAPANESE.]
I didn't recognize you! - [IN JAPANESE.]
No way.
[LAUGH.]
[IN JAPANESE.]
Shaking the waist, shaking the waist! - Oh, my God.
This is so nerve-racking.
- Let's have faith, guys.
[ANTONI.]
That pan is definitely too big for the flan.
[SCREAM.]
No, Yoko.
[IN JAPANESE.]
One, two and a three.
Oh! I did it! [KIKO.]
She did it! Look how beautiful that is.
[CHEERING.]
Oh, my God! [IN JAPANESE.]
Everyone, thank you for coming today.
What do you think about the Kumachan House transformation? [IN JAPANESE.]
[CHEERING.]
Amazing! [APPLAUSE.]
And how do you like the new Yoko Sakuma? [CHEERING.]
Yay! [APPLAUSE.]
It's kind of embarrassing to talk about this with everyone here.
[LAUGHS.]
I'm in my 50's, almost 60.
I didn't think about caring about myself and being confident about myself.
I thought that was okay.
This is brave to say all of this - Yeah.
- in front of these people.
[IN JAPANESE.]
But, Fab 5 showed me it's about having confidence in myself and understanding my value, and it's about a right to become happy.
The Fab 5 taught me that with love.
[APPLAUSE.]
[CHEERING.]
Yes.
We do, girl.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Hit it.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Wow! [LAUGHS.]
[APPLAUSE.]
[TAN.]
No matter where you are in the world, it doesn't matter what country you are from, what culture you're from.
Everything changes when we shift our perspective.
- [IN JAPANESE.]
Cheers.
- We are always capable of change and Yoko is such a gorgeous example of that.
- Here's to Yoko.
- Yeah.
[CHEERING.]
Cheers to Yoko.
It is never too late to start living.
- Yeah, girl.
- Amen.
How do we know Japanese? [IN JAPANESE.]
Everyone! Have you wondered why the Fab 5 can understand Japanese? [IN JAPANESE.]
Good question, Kiko.
So, why do we understand Japanese? Kiko said, "Ever wonder why the Fab 5 understands Japanese?" Jonathan said, "Good question, Kiko.
Why do we understand Japanese?" [IN JAPANESE.]
Let me introduce our interpreter, Lena! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Lena! Woo! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Lena, I love you! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Thank you very much! - Delicious! - [IN JAPANESE.]
Delicious? - [LAUGHS.]
["FUNICULI FUNICULA" PLAYING.]