Sherwood (2022) s01e01 Episode Script

Episode 1

1
This programme contains
strong language
And you've got
to make up your mind!
Are you going to accept it
down on your knees?
Or are you going to stand and fight,
and oppose the closure and
the butchery of your industry?
We'll never be defeated!
We're miners! United!
We'll never be defeated!
You saw the scenes which
went on in television last night.

I must tell you that what we've got
is an attempt to substitute the rule
of the mob for the rule of law.

A baton blow to the back of
the head, fracturing me skull,
and baton blows across me back,
me legs and me ankles.

Done by whom?
The police.
By the police.

Get in here and see
what they're doing.

In spite of the
ongoing strike, 10 of the 12
collieries in Nottinghamshire
have defied the union
and are operating normally.

Why aren't you in favour
of the strike?
Cos I can't afford to strike.

I just can't afford to strike.

Those men in
Nottinghamshire who want
to go to work could be subjected
to daily insults and reproaches
by those men who are out on strike.

As some of the
local miners walked in,
they were followed by groups of
flying pickets who'd spent the night
hidden in Sherwood Forest.

A lot of pickets
are very aggressive,
calling us names and
throwing stones at us.

We won't be bullied by pickets
from Yorkshire.

But I warn you that
if at the conclusion of this dispute
you are still crossing
our picket lines,
you will be stained till
the end of time as a scab!
Scab! Scab! Scab!
When you live in a village
and come from a village
what's connected to a mine,
what happens in t'community
happens to everybody.

Ooh! Oh, hello.

Hiya.
Sorry.

I didn't know if you were in or not,
so I was just going to post it,
but here.

Are you registered to vote?
Are you registered insane?
A Tory councillor?
Yeah, why not?
We have a Tory MP in Ash field now.

The red wall fell.
Didn't you hear?
Labour can't take working class
votes for granted any more.

Those days are long dead.

You're all right, me duck.

I'll post this anyway.

You can follow me on social media,
as and when.

Neel? What is it?
You're out bloody flyering, Sarah.

I'm not! I'm on my way
to the hairdresser's.

Stop having a go.

Yeah, well, our Danny's Gemma's
stepsister, Katrina, said
you knocked on her door, so
All right, I'm doing
a couple of roads
on the way to the hairdresser's.

Do you really think
this is the day for it?
How's it looking? OK?
Look, stop flyering, will you?
Not today.

OK.
OK.
I'll see you in a bit.

Noah!
Hey, look! It's Trevor Francis.

Who? Who?!
First million-pound player.

Notts Forest centre forward.

52-caps-for-England who!
Now, then.

See, you've got to be light
on your feet, lads, right?
But wi' power behind you! Wahey!
Like Muhammad Ali.

Float like a butterfly
sting like a bee!
Who's that?
Go on inside for your mamma.

Why? Go on.
Just do it.

Right, that's it, lads.

See you in a bit.

See you.

Right, I've got to dash.

Hold on.
Ian, you're wearing your
uniform.
What about the wedding?
Yeah, I did ask, but they said
I had to wear it for the photos,
you know And I've got
to salute the Sheriff.

OK, well, I'll take your suit
with me, then,
and you get changed there
before it starts.

But you cannot be late.

No.
I've got to go.
Go on, then.

Show me your salute for the Sheriff.

I thought that was a salute.

No.
That's American.

British, American,
British, American.

See you later.

Ian.
Uh-huh?
Don't be late.

Yes, ma'am.

Oh!
Would it kill any one on you to
clear away your plate just once?
Cindy, turn the telly off!
I always have it on when
I'm revising.
Mum lets me.

Fine.
I'll WhatsApp her, shall I?
Oh, God.
Does this make me
look like a twat?
Is that better?
Can I have a friend round while
you're out, help me revise?
A friend? What friend?
And what name?
So I can do background checks,
character references.

And, anyway, no - you're looking
after your little brother.

What time's his new bedtime? 11:00.

Is it bollocks! 9:00.

Noah Jackson, look at
Look at me.

What time do you go to bed at home?
9:00.
Good boy.

No.
Anyway, we'll be back by then.

He won't want to stay late.

Where have Mum and Dad even gone?
I told you, it's their wedding
anniversary.
Cindy, off!
Don't call me Cindy! I hate it.

Oh, why did my daughter have to give
her kids such bloody hippy names?
What? Nothing!
What do you do on an anniversary?
You go to a nasty hotel in the middle
of nowhere and you have sad sex.

Ah! Cinderella Jackson!
What? It's true.

They go and have nice meals,
and talk about all the nice memories
they have of being married to one
another, including giving birth
to two wonderful children, who are
always good at clearing away
their plates and
washing up the pots.

Don't you have a dishwasher?
Yes, I do.
Here it is.

Here's me dishwasher.
In't it fancy?
It can do everything -
backchat, snarl, moan
grumble.

Somebody's at the door.

There's somebody at the door!
There's somebody at the!
You don't know what
I'm talking about, do you?
It's Rod and Emu.
Gordon Bennett.

There's somebody at the door!
There's somebody at the
All right?
Sorry, but he's doing it again.

Who's doing what again?
You know what.

He's burning rubbish here, when
he's got a perfectly good allotment.

The wind's blowing it right into our
house.
It makes Fred struggle.

He can't control the direction of
the wind, can he? He's not God.

If it bothers Fred so much,
why doesn't he come and have
a quiet word? You know he's not
going to do that.
I'm sure Gary
would stop if he asked him.

Why should he? Not send his little
helper to do his dirty work for him.

OK.
Ta anyway.

Yeah, OK.
Bye.

There is quite a lot of smoke, Gary.

It's a fire.

Where there's smoke, and all that.

Neighbours have complained.

Let me guess.

Wow.
Oh, don't.

Don't.
I never wear hats.

I feel dead self-conscious.

I might just take it off.

Oh, you look
You look fantastic.

Come on.
It's time.

What'd she say?
She said, if you've got a problem,
you need to go round there yourself.

Arsehole.

Fred, that's my sister.

I'm talking about him.

Although she's an arsehole an' all.

Scott!
He's just gone out.

Hunting again.

Though, what he hunts
I haven't a clue.

Never seems to come back wi' owt.

We need to talk about next week.

He's not ready.

What's to get ready?
Daft ha'p'orth's getting sent down.

That's all there is to it.

Oh, aye, that's dead subtle,
that, Dad.

Kitchen table?
Where's our Ronan? Out.

Who else is going to do it?
Are you doing it?
Don't appear so.

Don't get tanked up.

I've got about five bookings
for this reception tonight.

I'm only having one.

Well? Well, what?
Don't "well, what?" me.

You had words? Is it him?
Right, fuck this.
Game of soldiers.

You want something doing
Oh, give over, Dad.

I got it, all right?
Sparrow Cabs.

Er, yeah, is that for
the Fisher wedding?
Supporting law enforcement in
this city is a passion of mine.

Not just because I'm relieved
it no longer falls to
the Sheriff of Nottingham to uphold
the law, but because keeping peace
for our community requires the
success of operations like Reacher.

And with that, we have a special
commendation for Detective Chief
Superintendent of the East Midlands
Special Operations Unit,
Ian SAINT Clair!
SAINT Clair! That's you, mate.

Er, thank you.
Thank you.

I don't mean to contradict you,
Madam Sheriff,
but it's pronounced the more
humble Sinclair, you know.

Oh
As my mother used to say, it's
a mutton name in lamb dressing.

Which didn't stop me having ten
bells o' shite knocked out of me
at school, by the way, but
Anyway.
Yes, I was head
of this operation,
but the success was down to my team.

They worked tirelessly to get these
criminals off our streets.

Now, we all know that policing
requires the cooperation
of the public.

We need their
their faith, support.

And we find ourselves not in
a particularly good place
in that regard at the moment.

And some might say with good reason.

The tradition is that we police
by consent,
and if we lose the consent
of the people, well
Now, we have a long way to go
to earn back
some of that trust.

Thank you very much.

Oh, my God!
Ah!
Oh, my God
Shit.

Sorry.
I tapped on If you'd
come round the front, Andy
If you'd just come round the front
and ring the bell.
Sorry.

This
This isn't the suit we ordered.

Yeah We sent off
your measurements.

Yeah, that didn't really fit.

Sorry.
Felt a bit tight
around the, erm
It's a fitted suit.

That's how it's meant to feel.

It feels fitted.

Yeah, well, I just
I just feel better in this.

And a suit's a suit, right?
And nobody will be looking at me.

And if they are,
that's a problem, eh?
Hello.

You remember Neel's dad, Andy?
Lives next door.

Yeah.
Hi.

All right.

You look, uh
You do, Sarah.

You look
Are you ready?
Yeah.
Yeah.
Shall we? Yeah.

Just lock the door for us, Andy,
will you? Right, yeah.

Oh, watch your step.

Yes, I know I told you.

I literally said get here early
I know.
Don't worry, don't worry.

It's all right.

Look, I'll change at the reception.

It'll be fine.

That was a lovely service.

Oh, thank you.

Cheers.

We'll see you there.

Shameless!
Absolutely shameless.

All right? I'm Andy Fisher.

I know a lot of you know me, and a
lot of you don't from Sarah's side,
but I look greatly forward
to getting to
know you all at some point.

I know it's ever so sad, of
course, that I happen to be
standing here today, of course.

But I'm also very touched that
Neel and Sarah have asked me,
in the absence of Sarah's father,
who, as you know
Was a scab can't be
with us no more, so
Thank you, Sarah, for asking me
to give you away today.

I'm very honoured.

You're off to the Yorkshire Dales
in a couple of weeks
after your, er, like
these elections.

It's a good choice.

Cos the Settle and Carlisle railway
line, which I got you tickets on,
is one of the oldest and most
beautiful in all the world.

It is, honestly.

Built in the 1840s by over
6,000 navvies,
many of whom lost their lives.

Some of the most harshest conditions
imaginable, cos you had your
the wind and your rain
and your snow.

And, erm
Well, smallpox was the
biggest killer.

But it stands, I think,
as a good metaphor for what
a good marriage is, based on
my own very happy life
with my late wife
and Neel's mum, Trudy.

The terrain required tunnels to be
blasted into the mountainsides,
and viaducts to cross gaping
valleys, like beautiful
Ribblehead Viaduct - which I'm
sure you've all seen pictures of,
even if you haven't been.

And then there's the incline
at Blea Moor.

It's a 1:100 gradient,
which the locals refer to
as "the long drag.
"
Which certain parts in the journey
of a marriage can feel like, eh?
But we we keep going.

Bridging the gaps.

Pushing through the obstacles,
and
get out the other side.

To Neel and Sarah.

Neel and Sarah!
Amazing.

Oh, fuck off.

Who's that?
No-one.

Come in, quick.

Nice to see you, an' all.

Ey up, Noah.
All right?
Mamma said
Mamma doesn't understand.

We have to be together to revise.

Yeah.
Biology.

Have to do it in pairs.

Shut up
Look, she didn't want you playing
that either, did she?
But I won't tell her
if you don't tell her.

Right? Right.

Come on.

Nice to have the house
all to yersen.

Shall we, uh, go upstairs?
It's my nan and grandad's,
so we can't be long.

Where does your mum and dad
think you are?
Ice skating.

All right, fucking Torvill.

Torvill was the girl, you dick.

I'm just a love machine
Feeding my fantasy
Give me a kiss or three ♪
No.

Mm! I could get a taste
for this stuff.

See, this is why we don't come
to these things.

If looks could kill, we'd have
a dozen or more knives in us back.

We had to come, didn't we?
He's my boss.

Gi' o'er!
No-one bosses Julie Jackson.

Don't worry.

I had what you might call
a difficult encounter
with public speaking today.

Never goes as bad as you think.

I didn't think it had gone badly.

Oh, right.
Well
that's good, then, innit?
Pint of mixed and a gin and tonic,
please, duck.

Oh, were you? No, no, you
You go.

How's it going, Gary?
It's, er, Ian St Clair.

I know.
It's going OK, ta.

Fine and dandy.

Hey, you should call your
daughter-in-law Maggie,
shouldn't you, pal?
Oh, right, I get it, yeah.

Cos she's
She's a Conservative.
No!
Cos tonight she'll be screwing
a working man.

It's what they do, in't it, Tories?
Fuck people.

Huh!
Saying that, historically,
around here there's a lot
that's happy just to take it.

Some people fuck themselves up.

Oh, hello.
What's that, pal?
All right?
Andy.
Deano.

I said, some people fuck
themselves up, don't they?
Act against their own best interest
out of pride or
stupidity.
I don't know.

Ooh, sorry.

That's a bit too deep for me.

Thanks, duck.
And that's
for your trouble, like.

Well, I'll leave you philosophers
to it.

N-U-M till I die ♪
He's, er, quite a character,
your friend.

Oh, he's not a friend.
No, just
Known him a long time.
A friend of
my dad's, you know, way back.

Right.
Yeah.

Listen, congratulations,
and you have a good night.

All right.

Hey.
Sorry about that.

Just bit of history.

No, it's all right.

You say you don't know
I say
Take me out ♪
Oh, look at my little bookworm.

Revising all night, were you?
Yeah.
Did you have fun at the party?
I must have done, cos I feel as
rough as a badger's arsehole.

Stop it, Grandad!
Oh, I wish I had
a head of hair like you
Then I'd have to buy me self
a comb or two
Ah, but still I've
got me wife ♪
Oh!
She's the lover of me life ♪
You soft bastard.
My bloody head!
Stop it! Oh, head! Why?
Your gran and your grandad can still
fancy each other, can't they?
No! It's disgusting.

Hey, don't get mad.

I've agreed to go up to Donny
next week.

Oh, have you? Reunion.

What's Donny?
Donny is up in Yorkshire.

Where a lot of your grandad's
old pals are from the old days.

When we dragged rocks from the
earth with us bare hands.
Rrr!
And, yeah, do you know
Come on.

when you were digging, and you
pulled a little black rock out
from the ground, and you held it,
you knew that you were the first
person on Earth to ever hold it.

Millions of years.

Right there in your hand.

Fred, it's ready.

Scott?
Scott, are you in?
Cathy wants to have a word
about tomorrow.

Scott
She's made a Sunday roast.

Ian says that you should wear
a suit for the sentencing,
but you don't want to be wearing
that for the first week in prison,
so you are allowed a small bag
of clothes to take.

I could do a wash today
if you want to leave out
some of your favourite things.

Um
I got this little book for you.

It's got all our numbers in it.

Cos you're not allowed a mobile
in there, obviously.

I thought you could write your
friends' numbers into that.

I'm only saying, because you don't
want to leave all this till Tuesday,
and had not done any of this.

I don't mean to get on at you,
but
It's about using the time
you have left.

Isn't it?
Yeah.

Yeah, you're right.
Thanks, Cathy.

Aye
Pint of mixed, please, bar woman.

Are you up to much today, Gary?
Owt or nowt?
Ah, not much, duck.

Not a great deal.

£2.
50, me duck.

There you go.

Ta.

Ah!
Do you know what?
Think I'm going to have to
get an early night.

Sorry.

Can we change the channel? No!
Sundays is Antiques Roadshow,
whether I'm down here or not.

It's tradition.

Do you want us to wake you? No.

Your grandad will crash in
drunk later.
That'll do it.

Night! Night.
Night.

Boo!
You twat! I shit myself.

Hello.

Thanks, Maddie.

Scab.

No No!
It were 30 fucking year ago.

Good girl.

Another pint of mixed, please, duck.

Er, no.

No, he's definitely not alive.

He Oh, Christ.

I've been here for ten minutes
Sir, can you step back a bit?
Nobody touched the body?
I'm on the phone to one of
your lads No worries.

Guys, if you wouldn't mind
staying in your houses
just for a minute, please, yeah?
Just for a second.

I didn't hear him come in,
didn't hear him go out.

He's like a bloody ninja.

Oh
Oh!
There's somebody at the door!
There's somebody at the door!
There's somebody at the door!
Stop it!
There's somebody at the door!
There's somebody at the door.

Mrs Jackson? Yeah.

Is your husband Gary Jackson?
Yes!
Mrs Jackson
I'm sorry to I'll go.

Oh, God Mrs Jackson!
What's happening?
No!
Gary!
Gary!
Get away! Get away! It's my husband!
Get the fuck off me!
Get off me! It's my husband!
Get off of me!
Oh.

No.
It's your day off, in lieu.

You know what "in lieu" means?
No, actually.

Sir?
Ian.
Yeah, something's come up.

Serious incident in Ash field
this morning.

Where a bouts?
I'm so sorry, Julie.

I know you're going to want
to be out there with him.

But it is honestly better if you
just stay in here.

It's a big shock, I know.

We have got a family liaison
officer and
No, I don't want lots of people
in here.

No.

Julie.

I'm so sorry.

How long has he been out there?
Has he been there all night?
Has he been there all night
all alone,
while I was here just
fucking sleeping?
Oh, God!
Where were he coming back from?
Er
Just the clubbie.

Just the clubbie, the usual.

Look, I'm, um
I'm sorry to ask, but can you
think of anyone? I mean
were there any ongoing disputes
with anyone at all?
Disputes?
Well
Nothing specific, no.

I mean, not not really.

Well, not anyone that would do that.

Do you want me to call
anyone for you?
You know, a friend just to
come and sit with you? No.

How about their mum, eh?
Shall I give your Rosie a call?
She's on a cruise.
She's
She's she's abroad.

She won't be back for another week.

Oh, Christ.
Don't make me
tell her on the phone, please.

It's her dad.

I can't tell her on the phone.

Right.
Well, we'll call her.

Oh, and Gary's phone - do you know,
did he have a pass code at all?
Yeah, yeah, it's, erm
It's the dog's birthday - 0708.

Oh, bloody hell.
The dog!
Was it all right? Yeah.

PIN for his phone.

Check his last calls, messages.

You can trace his last route
if you like, but she says
he was just to and from the club.

There's a nightclub round here?
Miners' welfare.

They call it the clubbie.

Interview the staff there as
a matter of priority.

Oh, and there's a dog.

Black dachshund-Jack Russell cross.

See if you can find it.

To give a witness statement?
Prints.

On the collar.
You never know.

Well, you always did promise to
invite me round your ends, boss.

Well, it WAS my end.

You all right? Yeah.

Go on.

Yep.

I won't speak ill of the
you know, but
Jacko weren't afraid to
you know, speak his mind, like.

He was proud, you know.

Sometimes that could get to people.

And because it's
round here, a lot of folk
Well, they just want to forget,
don't they? You know?
Is she all right, Julie?
There's a family liaison
officer with her now.

Right.

The landlady at the club said there
was some sort of altercation.

Did you witness that?
Oh, yeah.
Yeah.

What was it about?
Er, well
Just name-calling, really, uh
Yeah, he's been doing it for years,
to a lot of folk.

I have Well, we have, uh
nowt to do with him.
He's
Our families, we don't
No, there's nowt.

You said you came straight back
after your drink.
What time?
Oh what time? Er
Oh, it was half ten, maybe.

But we were all home,
all three of us.

All three of you? My stepson.

His son, Scott.
But he's out.

I'll need all three of you to
make full statements.
Yeah.

No-one in the family is engaged in,
like, any sort of archery?
No.

Get a job, will you?
Walk away, son! Like the coward
you was back then!
Hey! It's your lot's done
this to Gary!
Yeah, you heard me.

You're fucking mental,
the fucking lot of you.

Oh, come on, then.

Say that again!
Say that to my fucking face!
Come on, then!
Say that again!
Come on.
All right
Oh, look.
Here he fucking comes, eh?
Back up Like you give
a flying fuck.
Eh?
All your lot ever did was
make things worse!
Go on, piggy.
Do your job.

Trotter off.

Come on Get a life!
Once a scab, always a scab.

Come on, let's get in, eh?
Sorry.

Take no notice of that lot.

We never forget.
We
never forget around here.

All right.
Well, let us
just do our job, eh?
Aye.
Sorry, Ian.

He's on the PNC, Gary Jackson.

Arrested in October
October '84, yeah.

I remember.

I were a young PC at the time.

Suspected arson with intent.
Wow.

Alongside four others.

Charges were dropped following the
intervention of another officer.

What?
I can pull the file,
if you want to read it.

Oh, you can if you want.

But I were there, so I remember
what happened.

1984
George Orwell.

That's not what I were thinking.

Lab has just sent the results
from his phone.

Last text was Friday -
to a solicitor in Kirkby.

Chakrabarti.
He had an
appointment with him
today.
Well, let's get
someone up there ASAP, eh?
Oh, and the man who had
a row with Gary last night
is Dean Dean summat.

Dean
Dean Simmons.
Lives at number 13.

Yeah, I've just been dealing
with him out there.

And him and Gary had words
at the reception on Saturday,
so I don't care what his alibi is,
you make sure you get
his clothes from last night.

Yep, no problem.

In the victim profile, you should
mention that Gary were NUM.

National Union of Mine workers.

He were one of the few round here
who kept solidarity with them
during the strike.
This was
predominantly a UDM village.

Breakaway union.
They didn't support
the strike, went back to work.

All that was a while ago, ain't it?
I know.

James, let us know when that
printer's set up, would you?
Will do, sir.

We're miners!
United! We'll never be defeated!
We're miners! United!
We'll never be defeated!
We're miners! United!
We'll never be defeated!
A couple of private security
cameras confirm
Gary returned home at 10:18pm.

None of them caught what happened.

But he walks past this one
at number 23,
turns, coming back up the street,
passing it again,
possibly because his murderer
called out to him.

Anything else?
Well, what's sort of amazing is that
none of the neighbours, bar one,
mentioned the fact that there's
an archery range up on a farm,
off the Elmbank Road, run by
a family called the Sparrows.

Oh, the Sparrows.
Jeez
They're sort of "that family"
round here.

Only been charged with minor
drug of fences, so far,
but we suspect them of more.

So, I think people are wary
of naming them.

Truth be told, some folk round
here don't seem massively happy
to be speaking to us, full stop.

Well, don't take it personally.

There's a lot of history
round here with the police.

You're doing a good job.

You stick to it.

All right, you two.

After this, you go to the
Sparrows'.
Ta.
Mm-hm.

Is anyone, at some point,
going to mention the obvious
cultural reference point here?
Bow and arrow,
heart of Nottinghamshire
a modern-day Robin Hood
Can we not do that?
Start giving nicknames
to wanted murderers
and the press gets excited.

And these are good people.

I don't want their tragedy turned
into some tacky headline, all right?
Let's meet again at 6:00.

Just give us a sec.

Boss.

You might want to look at this.

Gary Jackson's arrest file.

Some of it's redacted.

Restricted access.

Restricted? Mm.

I assume it's with regards to the
information that led to his arrest.

Yeah, but his charges were dropped.

Makes no sense.

Well, the officer that intervened
to get it dropped was from
the London Met.
That might be
part of it, different force.

Yeah, I remember him.

Thanks.
Yep, no problem.

See you in a bit.

Dad?
Yeah.

Dad, look, I'm sorry.
But I did say
I had people coming round tonight.

I know, I know, I know.

Look, I'll get out your hair.

I just came back You left
the airbed and your clothes
all over the floor.
Well, that's
why I came back, cos I forgot
I don't mind you staying here.

I like you staying here.
Just
Come on.

Look, I am sorry, Adam, all right?
I know it's not ideal, but
Yeah Dad, listen.
Mum's going
to swing by, too, briefly.

I just thought you should know,
in case you came back early.

You know what? I'll twist the
knife in even further, shall I?
Save you the trouble?
Oh, Dad, come on.

If the two of you worked harder
together, maybe
It's not about trying harder, Adam.

You know, when two people are
wrong for each other
How can you say our family was
wrong? All right, all right.

Not wrong.
Just eventually
Just not right enough, you know?
Look, I'll be all right.

Don't worry about me.

Hello.

DI Salisbury? Yeah.

We have a call coming in from
Nottinghamshire Police for you.

Nottingham?
Yeah.
DCS Ian St Clair.

Can we transfer that through?
Yeah, Yeah.

Just bear with me.

Just transferring you now.

DI Salisbury.

DI Salisbury, this is Detective
Chief Superintendent Ian St Clair.

How can I help?
We're investigating the murder of
a local resident here, Gary Jackson.

His record shows that he was
arrested in October '84,
but the charges were dropped
following an intervention
by yourself, if I recall.

Well, as I'm sure
you can appreciate,
that was all quite a long time ago.

We're having trouble accessing some
of the relevant details, strangely.

Particularly who provided the
information leading up to
his arrest, and whether they
have anything to do
with his subsequent murder.

Yeah, well, if it's all right with
you, given how long ago it was
and how complicated this
particular matter was,
I'd prefer to submit anything
in writing, so it's less
Less clumsy.

Well, maybe I could send you
some questions,
and you can get back to me.

Yeah, that'd be fine.

We haven't got time for
your lot today.

We won't take more than a minute.

You can have it stood here,
then, can't you?
Don't need to come in.

Actually, we're investigating
a murder.

We wondered if you have any
records of regular visitors
to your range thing over there.

Why? Who got killed?
Your records.

This ain't Butlin's.

We don't keep records.

People come up, pay cash.

Here.

Ones who book by phone and leave
their name, at any rate.

Thanks.

We'll be in touch if we need
anything else.

Cheers.

Thank you.

We've looked into this, and,
regrettably, it appears
the information Notts Constabulary
require relates to
a confidential matter elsewhere,
unrelated to the poor victim.

A confidential matter
Nevertheless, we feel it might be
good if you actually went there.

Show willing, offer support,
an exchange between forces.

Yeah, and a way to get me
to clear off for a bit
while the IOPC deliver
their verdict on me.

It'd just be for a couple
of days, DI Salisbury.

But since you bring it up, it would
be good to discuss what options
are available to you in
advance of their decision.

What, firing squad, noose,
lethal injection?
You lost your head, Kevin.

A fellow officer is charging you
with physical assault.

Yeah, well, this anonymous officer
has a history of treating suspects
from certain ethnic backgrounds,
shall we say quite aggressively?
And when I witnessed
such behaviour
Yes, I've seen the X-ray of his arm.

Yeah, and I've seen the posts
he likes on social media, so
You've a decent record.

Twice interviewed to make DCI.

And yet, for various reasons,
it didn't quite pan out that way.

You've gone as far as you can, Kev.

Done your 30 years.

Pension in the bag, retirement's
there for the taking.

And then all this can go away.

Look, erm
My personal and financial
circumstances aren't in a
Yeah, I'm going through
a messy divorce.

And I do feel, what with
everything else, that
I would like to keep working
for a while longer.

Please.

Then it looks like you're going
to Nottinghamshire, doesn't it?
Hello?
Uh, Julie?
Hi.
Sorry for calling you late.

It's Ian St Clair.

Oh, yeah.

Yeah, go on.

Well, I were just wondering
if Gary, erm
you know, anything had come up
recently about his arrest
during the strike.
It's just,
we're having a bit of trouble
getting information around that.

What, in '84?
What's that got to do wi' anything?
Well, probably nothing.

Just, you know, we're covering
all the bases, that's all.

I probably shouldn't have called.

No.
Always call.

I want you to always call,
wi' anything.

Are you all right?
No.

But I've got my grand kids
here and
my daughter's on her way, so
Are YOU all right?
Yeah.
Erm
Look, we'll be in touch.

All right? Goodbye.

Yeah.
Bye.

totally responsible for
that happening, all right?
So don't worry.

You all right, love?
Yeah, yeah, fine.

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