The Spanish Princess (2019) s01e05 Episode Script

Heart Versus Duty

1 Previously, on "The Spanish Princess" Harry cannot marry her.
She's his brother's wife.
It's a sin.
She says she did not lie with Arthur.
I've learnt the name of our tormenter, Edmund de la Pool, your own wife's cousin.
He burns for me.
You said you had given him up, Rosa.
I want to, but I don't know how.
I am a virgin, as I was when I first came to England.
So they were married both in word and deed? I cannot say.
I did not bear witness to it.
If she seduces Harry and marries him upon this lie, you will burn in Hell! You cannot simply throw me out.
Yes, I can, and have.
LINA: What do you want from me? I want you to say yes.
I will take Princess Catherine of Aragon to be my wife.
Ave Maria, gratia plena Dominus tecum, benedicta tu Lord give me your wisdom.
You have called me to be Queen of England.
Shall I take the king to be my husband? Why don't you speak to me? KING HENRY: How dare you challenge me? It was your mother's dying wish.
Does that mean nothing to you? HARRY: She was dying! She was in agony! And you would put yourself ahead of the queen's command? No.
I think that you asked this from her.
- [GROANS.]
- Why would her final wish be to take away my happiness? You always think everything is happening to you.
No, I think, Father, - that you are jealous - Ohh! jealous of my confidence and my courage.
And I think you seek to take away the one thing that I desire.
What did we do to make him as he is? [SIGHS.]
As if this wasn't already hard enough.
For once in my life, I find myself agreeing with your late wife, God rest her soul.
- Mm.
- I now see the wisdom of this union with the girl.
I'll soothe our hothead.
You go and see your new wife-to-be.
Uh, is this for me? Sir Richard Pole left it for me because I refused to see him.
He pleads for his wife's return, no doubt.
She disobeyed our rule, Henry.
I will not have that.
[OVERLAPPING CHATTER.]
[MUSICIANS PLAYING.]
WOLSEY: Princess Catherine, welcome.
This way, Your Highness.
[CHUCKLES.]
Why do you smile, Your Grace? I smile, because we're both clearly having such a splendid time of it.
[FORK CLATTERS.]
When one is king one dines for many reasons with many guests for politics, to gain intelligence, to push a truce to pursue a bride.
I'm not unfamiliar with the sensation of this table growing longer nor the food growing more tasteless upon the plate.
I'm sorry.
I do not wish to take away your appetite.
Did you and the queen take all your meals in here? Goodness, no.
Look at it! [CHUCKLE.]
Arthur liked to eat under the trees.
He would have taken all his meals outside, come wind or rain.
As did his mother given the chance.
When we were first wed, I arranged picnics for her throughout the grounds.
I tried everything to warm her heart.
She was cold to you? Mm.
But you were so in love.
A blind man could see it.
The battle for her heart was hard-won.
Winning the throne of England was less arduous.
When did you know that she loved you? I cannot tell you the hour.
Only that one day I was aware of a peace in my heart a sense that when I was with her I was home.
You know, you have the look of her in your eyes.
[CHUCKLES.]
You both had mothers who not so much raised you, but smelted you.
[LAUGHS.]
I am a lump of steel.
[LAUGHING.]
There.
Who said I cannot woo a woman? Come.
Now that your Infanta is to wed the king your own marriages must be addressed.
Charles Brandon has selected you, and both the Duke of Rochester and the 11th Baron Willoughby de Eresby will each be offered you.
I was told I was to have a say in who I wed.
Well, perhaps you might have if Prince Arthur had not passed away, but now the choice is mine alone, and my sole consideration is that you marry loyal men within my house.
Will you still wait for Catherine's dowry to be paid by Queen Isabella? There's no need.
The alliance is preserved.
But she will not become queen in her own [GAGS.]
[RUNNING FOOTSTEPS.]
[MUFFLED RETCHING.]
Rosa! - Rosa - Stay away! It is the plague, the sweating plague.
Help me, Jesus.
[WEEPING.]
Ay, no.
- There is no sweat.
- [COUGHS.]
It was the guinea fowl.
It must have been too old.
She ate some bad food.
Did she? It was the guinea fowl.
The two men who may wed you will be waiting in the Great Hall.
They will look at you as you pass by.
It may aid the path of love were you to wipe the vomit from your chin.
Vamos.
[BELLS PEALING.]
Ladies, I give you the Duke of Rochester My ladies.
and the 11th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.
Enchanted.
The king insisted I be brought back here so I could have my portrait started Where is Rosa going? She is unwell, Highness.
I am finished with this today.
He has written to my mother to ask her for her blessing on our marriage, but I don't believe I have been blessed since I left Spain.
Then perhaps you should return to Castile.
Go back to your mother.
Find another life.
At least you have that option.
I do not.
Lina? Lina! Why do you talk to me this way? I have supported you in every way I can and perhaps some ways that I should not.
I have been loyal to you.
And now the king says he'll have you, so you should rejoice in victory and take the orange that has landed in your lap.
If your destiny is to be Queen of England, take the king, but if your dream is love, then that is all I want, too.
Then find love with your husband.
Charlie Brandon? I cannot love a fool! I am in love with Oviedo, the bowman, who is not a Tudor, nor a noble, nor an Englishman.
Nor is he Catholic.
I've been told he worships Islam.
There is no law against it here in England, but in Spain, if we went back, he would be tortured by your mother.
And perhaps I would be, too, because they don't believe those who converted.
My mother would do no such thing.
It must have been the church.
If I wed Oviedo, who will cast me from your service? Is it the king? Lady Margaret Beaufort? Or is it you? Lina you came here for a better life.
Now, if you throw it all away, how would you live, raise children? The men the Tudors took from me, including your man Oviedo, are not even paid a wage.
They work for food and lodging.
You cannot raise a child on that.
I have some money that my parents left me when they died, and then I'll think of something I can What thing would you think of, Lina, to support yourself, your husband, and your children? - I - You have a duty to my mother and to me and to your parents, who worked their lives to send you here for this.
You will tell me when you've chosen if you will take your Tudor husband or will leave my household.
MAN: My Lord! Easy, there.
Richard.
How is Westminster? I tried to speak to Lady Margaret, but she seems quite certain of your treachery.
I have always been a Plantagenet and always been the enemy to her.
Yet in her anger, Lady Margaret has done me a great service.
I may stay here with my children in the country, free from all of them.
You think she will let you stay here in peace? You think she won't break you every chance she gets? You defied her, Maggie.
I love my children, and I would die for them.
I know you would, so lie for them! Tell Lady Margaret Arthur's marriage was a full one.
No.
I have told that woman what I know, and only what I know to be the truth, that I didn't see Catherine and Arthur with my own eyes.
You tread a dangerous path.
I tread a narrow one, I know, but that path is my conscience.
The Tudors have taken a great deal from me, Richard, but they will not take that.
The king says he will marry Catherine.
I suppose that eases things a little.
Maggie, if you've heard from your cousin, you must say so.
It may even save your place at court.
Have you heard nothing that I have said? I do not want a place at court.
And I have not heard from him.
[BIRDS SQUAWKING.]
- Harry.
- We will fight him, Catherine.
Tell your mother to refuse the match.
Your children won't succeed you if they're sired with him, and your mother surely doesn't want a barren throne for you.
She may not even care about that anymore.
We don't know what she'll say.
Well, then you must tell him no, that you won't have him.
How should I refuse him, Harry, the King of England? Do you think he will smile kindly on my marriage to his son if I insult him and drive a dagger in his pride? I cannot disobey the king.
- [CHUCKLES.]
Why not? - Because he'd send me back to Spain.
But you are your mother's daughter.
You don't hear no.
You fight.
What, did you trifle with me just to win my father? No! Of course I didn't.
If you want him, say so and I'll know you for a devil in a dress.
You don't know, do you? How is this my doing? How is this at my door?! You don't know what you want.
I don't know what my choices are! I don't know if I have a choice.
Well, damn you, then.
If your love is so fickle that it can blow away like dust I will forget you.
MAGGIE: "Dearest Meg, it warmed my heart to get your letter.
I couldn't bear it that you thought I hadn't said goodbye to you in London.
What a joy to read that you do not believe your life in Scotland will be unpleasant.
I hear he is an accomplished man and interested in everything.
Although a nursery full of bastard children is more than I would bear on my arrival, so I think you are a stronger woman than I am.
I'm glad that you are happy, though, and I report the same.
My only sorrow is my husband, as I know I've disappointed him.
Your loving aunt, Maggie.
" [OVERLAPPING CHATTER.]
[COUGHING.]
[SPITS.]
[COUGHS.]
Was that caused by the guinea fowl as well? Rosa, when did you last bleed? I don't know.
Some weeks ago.
How many weeks? Four? Six? I must talk to Stafford.
I must tell him.
No! Rosa, he is married.
If you tell him, he will deny it was him, and he will abandon you.
No! He would never leave me.
Do you know what they do to unmarried mothers? You wouldn't just be flogged.
You would lose your place with the Infanta and be begging on the streets with a tiny baby.
Wh-What should I do? Lina, help me.
Maximilian has yet again refused to hand over the traitor Edmund de la Pool.
- [SIGHS.]
- We've offered trade deals, money.
God knows his country needs it, but still he has refused.
He is coming for me.
Dudley, where's my army? Ah, yes, Your Grace.
Your Grace.
The military expansion is a costly venture Uh, sorry.
Why do we need men? Wh-Why are we expanding? Because the threat of an invasion led by Edmund de la Pool Oh, right.
Um, de la Pool, the York.
Yes.
Yes.
We had agreed on a defense tax, but it'll take time to raise the funds to pay the men Well, then don't raise them.
You are hell-bent on robbing the people.
Pull men from the armies of all the nobles sitting here.
Stafford, how large is your retinue, 300 men, 400? If we centralize the military, my father wouldn't have to beg and simper to you all like a serving maid.
[CHUCKLES.]
My son is angry, because a girl who has his young heart in her keeping prefers a king to a boy.
But if he spent less time on girls and ale, he would know that we are already drawing men from all these noble houses! And so your contribution to this privy council is of no use whatsoever! Gentlemen, please leave us.
The council is dismissed.
Ale can be a marvelous thing.
It lures me into taverns on a quest for insobriety, but while you men grow old with talk I discover.
De la Pool is here, in London.
Harry.
Harry! Harry.
So it's true, Edmund de la Pool is here? It's not difficult to rule, to find out what you want to know, if the people love you.
[SCOFFS.]
Where is he? He's very near the palace.
Where is he?! I will deal with this.
I don't know what you're so up in arms about.
You always want me at the council meetings.
If you cut yourself off from your father, then you cut yourself off from the source of your power.
There's an apothecary on Charm Street, and de la Pool is hiding there.
You know, sometimes I wonder about you, Harry.
Are you ever for England or only for yourself? [CHUCKLES.]
- We're up, soldier.
- Aye.
Hello.
I was hoping you might ask the women of the kitchens where a lady goes for help if she should find herself unwed with child.
Rosa.
I cannot ask them, or my honor will be questioned, - which would damage the Infanta.
- [CHUCKLES.]
If you ask, they will think that That I have been dishonorable and want to cover my mistakes? I am promovido, groom to the armory.
Promoted? I am pleased for you.
And are there wages for it? There are other things than money, Lina.
Is Margaret Pole at court? Perhaps she will take pity on me.
She is not welcome here no more.
The king's mother told her to get out.
The men say there is un burdel in Bankside above the tavern.
A whorehouse? The women there will help Rosa.
But [SEABIRDS CALLING.]
[COUPLE GRUNTING, GASPING.]
[OVERLAPPING CHATTER, LAUGHTER.]
MAN: Hey, dark mistress, come sit by me.
[MEN CHEER TOGETHER.]
Thank you.
WOMAN: Hold still, slave.
Come to work or to get rid? Th-The second one.
In my day, it was catgut.
They say it's all much safer now.
MAN: Oh, here he goes.
Come on, Willoughby.
Good man.
Here's upon Willoughby! [MEN LAUGHING.]
That's it! Willoughby, Baron de Eresby? Yeah, the 11th.
You're one of hers, aren't you, that Spanish princess? No.
You are mistaken.
Be quite a scandal, wouldn't it, highborn girl like you flogged on Tower Hill? Bad news for her princess-ship.
She might not want you in her gang no more.
Do you have what I need or not? I do, love, but it'll cost you.
How much? Of course, if you can't pay, you can make a pretty penny with your lovely skin.
Lady Night-time.
How much will it cost? This'll do away with the little problem.
[FROGS CROAKING.]
So what's it gonna be? Ha! You can't come in, Lady Grandmother.
Hmm.
Unless you bring more wine.
[SNORTS.]
My lady.
The soldiers stormed the shop and found his man, but de la Pool had gone.
We questioned the man.
No! No! No! No! No! In the end, he told us his master had sailed.
Perhaps if you'd told us sooner, we'd have caught him.
Perhaps my father brought it on himself.
And perhaps your blood will stain the English soil for what you did today.
De la Pool would cut your throat in a heartbeat, but you let him slip the net and have safe passage back to the Hapsburgs, and all because some foreign girl has pitted you against your father like some commoner in a brawl.
Well, thank you for the visit, Lady Grandmother.
Will you ask Charlie to come back in on your way out? What you feel for her is lust.
It's of the flesh.
It's not of the heart.
You're You're a healthy, strong young man.
You've had kingship thrust upon you as a burden on your grief.
Perhaps there are some appetites that you've not had free rein to satisfy.
- What? - [DOOR OPENS.]
Lord Stafford has some friends for you to meet.
[WOMAN GIGGLES.]
While I go to evening prayer.
[CHANTING IN LATIN.]
Thank you but what I feel is of the heart.
If she wants my father, I will step aside.
But if she wants me, I will fight him to the death, if needs be.
You have not bled? You put it up inside if you do not wish to have the baby.
Where did you get it? It doesn't matter.
Lina, I am afraid.
Do you think I should take Rochester or Willoughby instead? No, I don't.
I don't.
[SQUAWKS.]
[WHISTLES.]
MAN: Hello? [CHATTER OUTSIDE.]
I'm coming in, so don't say no.
- I have something to say.
- But I came to you.
You came to tell me you will fight for me.
Am I correct? - Yes, I - And you hate your father for stealing me away, and and you want me to know that if I marry him, I condemn myself to a miserable, loveless life.
That's right, yes.
That is what people do.
The prisoners begging for their lives and offering contrition, they beg and plead, but their pleas are always met with deafness for one simple reason, that they must go to the block because the king decrees it.
So you're saying you must marry him because he said so.
Because he is the king.
I'm saying there is duty that both of us must cleave to.
[SCOFFS QUIETLY.]
You know, I admit that when I first wrote to you in Spain, it it was a game.
But then the more I read of you and knew you, I Well, I haven't known as many women as you think, Catherine, and those that I have were of the flesh.
You are not.
I mean, I I-I want to.
But But the point is that the point is that that I love you.
And love exalts us into God's arms.
I-It is his greatest gift to us.
It makes us one with him.
Catherine, it leaves duty in the shadows.
You are a wonder.
You make me yearn to be king so that I can be a better man for you.
You are a wordsmith.
You bend words to your whim.
Well, then feel what I'm saying.
And then give me your answer.
[ARMOR CLANKING.]
A boy kisses you, and everything I've taught you is undone.
- Leave me, Madre.
- He will bring you pain.
The betrayal he will deal to you, it will break the world.
- You are wrong.
- Guard yourself! If you do not, the enemy will know just where to strike.
[BLADE STABS.]
[BELL PEALING.]
Lady Pole is banished from the court.
My lady, the king's mother says she lied for you.
Banished? For how long? Forever.
Is she at her home in Stourton? We will go to her, this very moment, now.
[SNORING.]
[SOFT CONVERSATION.]
The king demands we send him all our men.
- All? - We're being punished.
Others may keep a small retinue.
We may not.
This is more than taxes.
Your cousin was seen in London stirring up support.
The king and his mother are certain he will strike, and they see treachery at every turn.
If they see treachery, then they are looking in a mirror.
We'll have to mend the cart ourselves.
- Mother! - We'll get the boys to help.
It'll toughen them up.
Mother! Her Grace, the Spanish princess, is here to see you.
Maggie, do not join her cause.
Your cause is here, with the children and me.
- Down there.
- [SPLASH.]
My Lady Pole.
Catherine.
Lady de Cardones.
I have learned you have been banished from the court, because you spoke out for me to Lady Margaret.
- I spoke for no one but myself.
- Still you have suffered for my benefit.
I wish to make amends.
You can do nothing.
In fact, the rift has served me well.
Perhaps I should be thanking you.
We are united in Margaret Beaufort's hatred of us both.
May we take refreshment? Lady Pole I wish to ask you for your guidance.
Ah.
The king.
He is a decent man.
And he would make you queen.
I want you to tell me what kind of husband he would be.
You ask me to petition for a king whose presence I'm not seen fit to stand in? [SIGHS.]
Oh, this family.
You prefer his son, then? It was Arthur I was close to.
But Harry he is clever and has a fevered lust for knowledge.
His appetites flood in all directions, wise and foolish.
He runs at life, which means he's not always constant in his interests.
There is danger in him.
He was not sired to be king.
He was mollycoddled by his grandmother.
A man with too much power and no discipline is dangerous.
I see another side to him.
He is passionate and poetic.
He is like a knight of Camelot flawed, but also brave and dedicated.
Lancelot.
You clearly know your mind about him, so why ask me? Catherine, if you wish to be queen, then take the king.
But I think you rode here not just to ask for forgiveness, but to speak Prince Harry's name aloud.
I think you love Harry.
May God help you if you do.
[CHILDREN CHATTERING.]
Dada, look.
I'm helping.
HENRY: Ursula.
Go.
Henry, look.
What did she want? To ease her heart.
Do you know I've realized I admire her? She's brave, and she's certain she's right.
I wish I'd been more like her when I was younger.
Maggie.
Whatever my life has thrown at me, I'm glad you're in it, Richard, that we have each other, our love.
[BIRDS CHIRPING.]
Lina, do you think me selfish? You are trained to be a queen.
You ask others to make sacrifices.
It is the way of kings and queens.
You have been my closest friend and confidante since we came to England.
I cannot think of living here without you by my side, but I will not be the cause of your unhappiness.
You're right.
You've done too much for me.
And if you wish to marry Oviedo, then you will find support from me.
- I - I cannot promise you will stay within my household, as that may not be within my gift, but you will have a dowry from me three gold plates.
You may melt them down, and that will be a start, at least, if you should have to make your own way.
Thank you.
Thank you, Highness.
Catherine.
We are friends, I hope.
Yes.
Yes, we are friends.
Sisters.
[LAUGHS.]
Lina! Rosa, what is it? I am so sorry.
I can't do it.
I can't kill my baby.
I-I'll pay you for pesario.
Tell me what you paid.
I shame Your Highness.
Please don't let them flog me.
Rosa is with child, señora.
Lina, prepare my bath.
The father will not marry you? He has a wife.
But I need to tell him.
I think that he will help me.
Lina, will you come with me? [KNOCK ON DOOR.]
Stay with her.
Infanta, I Perdona esta intrusión.
The queen, your mother, she sends word to the king.
What does she say? I think she writes the same to you.
QUEEN ISABELLA: "Are you to have two husbands? I received two letters, each about a different man.
You want to wed Prince Harry.
Then the king writes that he will take you for himself.
Take the bird in hand and be grateful at your luck.
You're lucky now to even make a queen.
" You have permission for your marriage to the king.
QUEEN ISABELLA: "Your sister can find no luck of her own.
- [BABY CRYING.]
- She stayed with me in Spain for the birth of her child, but it made her very sick.
[GRUNTING.]
None of us had sleep for months until she sailed back to her husband and took the child with her.
" She writes to me that she is troubled by your sister, Lady Joanna.
She helped her with the baby.
It left her very tired.
Tell me, Ambassador whose eyes are these? Are they the eyes of queen consort to King Henry? Please inform the Prince of Wales that I would like to see him.
I was glad to get your message.
God has placed this moment in my lap.
He means to make me see myself and listen to my heart.
He means for us to be together.
[SIGHS.]
Oh.
But But what has changed? Did your mother refuse my father? No.
She wrote and gave permission.
- Then how how are we to - Trust your God.
And trust in me.
[DOOR OPENS.]
Your Grace.
We received a letter from your mother.
I am aware of it, Your Grace.
And do you give consent? Would I make you happy? Would I make you as happy as your wife did? [SIGHS.]
As you know, Catherine, I, um I loved my wife.
I still do, but, uh, I would try to be a husband to you.
I would be respectful and considerate, and I would not bother you too much.
It was her dying wish.
If she knew you could not love me, then she did it for the safety of your country, for the alliance between Spain and England.
- Yes.
- But marrying me does not secure that.
In fact, it does the opposite.
If we wed, our children won't succeed us.
Of course not.
Harry's will, as Lizzie's son.
The throne belongs to Harry, then his son, and then his grandson.
So how long would your treaty hold with Spain? Only until, God forbid, you pass away and Harry takes the throne.
And then, just when he needs it the most, there will be no protection.
I would be the widow to his father.
I could not command my country to his side.
He would be alone in all of Europe and whoever then rules Spain would make treaties with your enemies.
Or else they would renew their pact with England.
There are many benefits.
You wish to marry Harry.
My wife had many gifts, and she said if you married him, then there would be no sons.
She saw this.
You don't think your wife saw in your eyes how lonely you would be? And in pain for you, perhaps she was confused.
Because the first time I met her, she told me she'd do anything to save her sons.
She'd kill for them.
Don't take the risk.
Give Harry the alliance.
Keep him safe for her.
[RELEASES ARROW.]
I do not think this is a good idea.
I know you do not like him.
[SIGHS.]
But he cares for me.
You'll see.
Ah, Lady de Vargas.
Lord Stafford, I must speak with you.
Well, I'm [LAUGHS.]
You're not, uh not with your mistress? I am carrying your child.
I know you have a wife, and I will not cause you trouble.
I ask for just enough to live on, a tiny house for me and the baby, that you give us food, and visit us sometimes.
That sounds like a good idea.
And I will make arrangements.
John, do you know where Oviedo is? Uh, Richmond.
The king build new palace.
It must be guarded.
It must be wonderful to be rich.
I hear they will be back in, uh, one month or maybe two.
[ARROW STRIKES.]
- Wine.
- My Lord.
Lady Catherine of Aragon and Castile I withdraw my proposal of marriage to you.
You will instead be betrothed to my son Henry, Prince of Wales.
Your heirs will ensure the continued peace between our two kingdoms.
Thank you, Father.
- Henry - I will send my letter to the pope requesting his dispensation.
- Thank you, Your Grace.
- If he grants it, you may be married only when your mother sends the dowry.
Your future hangs upon Castile.
URSULA: You look busy, Father.
This one doesn't look too good, either.
- I'm gonna need to replace it.
- Father, can I help? [CLEARS THROAT.]
Ah, you can get me the axle grease.
[CHUCKLES.]
Ah, good.
Then I can get a drink.
MAGGIE: Come on, Ursula.
Come and help me with the supper.
Yes, Mother.
Come on, little help.
How 'bout I take you in with me? Where is it Ah, there it is.
We've got meat pies for supper.
URSULA: Ah, behave.
Can you help with supper, too? RICHARD: Reggie, careful! - [CART THUMPS.]
- [REGGIE YELLS.]
[MUSIC PLAYING.]
Henry, Henry, come and help me! Help me.
Father! REGGIE: Mother! Get the jack! Get the jack, Henry! It's all right, Richard.
[GRUNTING.]
We'll get it off.
[COUGHING.]
We're almost there, Richard.
Quickly! That's it.
Reggie, Ursula, go inside.
Father.
[GASPING.]
Oh, please, Richard, please, don't leave me.
I can't do this without you.
I love you.
[CRYING.]