Unforgotten (2015) s03e03 Episode Script

Series 3, Episode 3

1 There is some evidence to suggest that Hayley was strangled.
DCI Stuart, Hayley was a friend of mine.
I was supposed to be doing a cleaning job, Hayley did the job for me.
It was in a holiday rental.
I'd forgotten that's who we let it to.
He does that quiz show on the BBC.
James Hollis.
Just give me ten minutes, I'm not feeling 100%.
Dad, this is not about the past.
Or, at least, not the past you're talking about.
I love you.
I love you, too.
Tim, it's your word against hers.
I pretended to go out.
I just heard him go for her.
I don't believe I ever lost my temper.
I'd appreciate having somebody here.
They took money I had for a deposit on a flat.
I do think you should consider opening a bank account.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No bank accounts.
I would feel very lucky to be able to help you grow stronger.
There'll be money in the joint account tomorrow.
Mr Carr sold my father a cash ISA.
We want to cancel it.
I can't see any paperwork here.
Mr Hollis, we wondered if you had five minutes, please, to help us with a case we're investigating.
I will need my lawyer present.
Els, it's Dad again.
They've come about her.
All we do is hide away All we do is All we do is hide away All we do is lie and wait All we do is All we do is lie and wait I've been upside down I don't wanna be The right way round Can't find paradise On the ground.
PAN SIZZLES Oh, shit! Oh, you Dad! Dad! Yeah? Morning.
Blimey! Are you all right? You left a pan on.
Me? No.
Yeah, I walked in and it was burning.
Is that your porridge? This was off when I left.
Right.
Well, I've, like, literally just walked in.
So Well, it's still under warranty.
I'll get in touch with the company.
I'm sorry.
If I knew anything, I'd tell you, Mr Hollis.
You know I would.
I do.
But if you do hear anything, tell him I need to speak to him.
Tell him it's really urgent.
And, so, in the end, the case really came down to one person's word against another's.
And in this instance, we feel bound to consider Dr Finch's many years' exemplary practice and his reputation as a hard-working, generous and trustworthy GP.
And as such, we find we do not uphold the complaint.
I heard him.
He might sit there now looking like butter wouldn't melt, but he's got another side to him.
Yeah, you look embarrassed, mate.
You should, cos you're a disgrace! Guv Yeah? He is here 'Peter, its Mark Harper.
'Kate and I can find no record of any paperwork 'relating to an ISA in the name of Salthouse 'and I need to know today how a three-grand cheque from him 'has been cashed.
'So you really need to call me.
' DOOR CLOSES There.
OK, er .
.
I'm going to change all of your settings so that only your friends can comment.
What does it make them feel when they say those things? I doubt very much they feel anything at all, Mum.
Cos they're messed up.
And that, that isn't about Dad or about you or Hayley.
It's about them.
It's just a mirror people hold up to themselves to shout at.
I wanted, if I may, erm, to ask you about a house you rented in Middenham, in December 1999, which I believe .
.
was an eight-bedroom house.
Yes, I can't remember specifically but, yes, it was big.
There were a bunch of us.
Three other families? Yes, although, for the first few days, there were only me and three mates.
Erm, our wives and kids joined us on New Year's Eve.
Right.
It was primarily a golfing break.
Oh, OK.
Erm, and what were their names, please, the men? Tim Finch.
Chris Lowe.
Pete Carr.
And are they all still around? Yep.
Still friends? Yes, we were at school together, so it's a long connection.
And the families, erm, can you give me details of those people? Tim was there with his first wife Derran and their, er two little girls.
Pete was single at that time, so on his own.
And Chris Lowe was with his first wife Laura and their little girl.
And your wife? Yes, my wife Mel and our little boy Eliot.
Are you two still together? No.
I remarried a few years ago.
Oh.
So, this is a photo of Hayley Reid.
Do you recognise her? Yes.
And is that just from the papers? Sorry, where is this heading? SHE SIGHS We're just trying to corroborate evidence from another witness, who thinks Hayley might have cleaned the house you rented.
I have no recollection of that.
You never saw her there? No.
I mean, we were out most days, but, hey, this story was huge and her photo was all over the TV.
So, if she had cleaned our house and any of us had have seen her, then I think someone would have mentioned something.
Absolutely.
When did you return to London, Mr Hollis? Erm, when the rental ended, which would be .
.
perhaps, er, around the second or third.
And you drove back up with your wife and child? Yes.
How did they got down there on the 31st? Train.
I picked them up from a nearby station.
OK.
And this is the last question.
Erm what did you all get up to on the Millennium evening? Erm Well, as I remember, we, er .
.
we had a meal in the house, all together.
Then, I think the, erm .
.
the children stayed up a bit, till about nine or ten.
I think the adults watched a movie and then all went to bed after Big Ben.
Is that all of you? As I recall, yes.
And then no-one went out again for the rest of the night? No.
OK.
That's it.
Thank you.
Thank you very much for your time.
Sorry You said you guys met at school.
Yes.
Where was that, the school you went to? Finchley.
Right.
And you all, erm .
.
lived round that area? Within a couple of miles, yes.
OK, thanks again.
Well, I think we want to know more about four guys who grew up half a mile from her grave.
I think we do.
Hollis, you wanker.
CAMERA CLICKS Shit! And this sort of sized garden is very unusual for a flat in this part of the city.
It's also west-facing, so Anyway, have a natter and I'll be outside if you need me.
Thank you.
He's never had a garden with grass before.
You like it.
I think it's perfect.
What? There's a "but" coming.
But .
.
if we're going to be properly together .
.
I need to know who you are, Chris.
Who I am? How does someone like you, so .
.
brilliant, so lovely .
.
end up like you have? How does that happen? So we had two key leads that I believed were potentially significant, but were never resolved.
St Matthew's C of E, which was burgled at some point that New Year's Eve, with about five grand's worth of 18-century silverware taken from a locked cupboard in the vestry.
Blood smears were retrieved on some smashed glass into the vestry, but there were no matches with anyone on our database.
The church is about halfway between The Swan and Hayley's parents' original house.
And one possible theory was that she saw something after she left work, she went to investigate and ran into the burglar or burglars.
Certainly, I believe it's worth following up again.
And then a black car, which was seen driving very erratically on the road between The Swan and her house at approximately 12:25, maybe 15 minutes after we know she left the pub.
No reg or make, but the witness thought it was a black four-door saloon with a tow bar.
Oh, and it's worth mentioning that the weather was very bad that night, with heavy rain from about 11 o'clock onwards and very poor visibility.
That's it.
So John will be available for the rest of the day, and then on the phone, at any point, for any questions.
But given what he's just told us, I suggest DNA swabs should be taken from any suspects we speak to.
Thank you again, John.
That was very useful.
So .
.
specific points of action.
Fran, can you double-check all these timelines, please, for Hayley's movements on the night of her disappearance and the week before? Boss.
Murray, you take the witness who saw this car.
Yup.
And, Jake, obviously, the body was found in London and, given that new development, it's worth having another chat with Adrian Mullery, I think.
Guv.
And following this morning's interview with James Hollis, myself and DI Khan will certainly be speaking to the other three male occupants of The Spinney.
OK, that's it.
Thank you, everyone.
That was great.
Thank you again.
Yeah.
No problem.
So are you heading back down tonight or? No.
No, no, my kids live with their mum in town, so I'm going to stick around, spend some time with them for a few days.
Right.
How old are they? 21 and 20.
Ah, same as mine.
Boys or? Two boys.
Jinx.
Hm! Er, anyway, I better go and check into the hotel, so Go for it.
And we will speak soon, I hope.
Yeah, absolutely.
John Thanks for that.
That was great.
Listen, er if you're at a loose end any evening, there's always a few of us at The Enterprise, if you fancy a drink.
It's just opposite.
Yeah, great.
Cheers.
I might take you up on that.
Good.
All right, see you.
See you.
See you.
Cheers.
SHE CLEARS HER THROA You're welcome.
PHONE RINGS Oh! Hola, gordo conejo.
Hola, muy gordo conejo.
How you doing? Yeah, all good.
You? Yeah, very well.
I've just been in Manchester on a work thing, driving back to Sussex now with Caz.
Oh, right.
Give her my love.
I will.
But listen, very quickly, I presume you've seen the news about the Hayley Reid case.
Yeah, I did.
It's very sad.
Oh, wasn't it? Anyway, the police are obviously doing a general trawl for potential new witnesses.
And they spoke to me this morning about the house we rented.
Right.
Apparently they think she may have been our cleaner.
Wow! I said I couldn't recall us having a cleaner and I certainly think one of us would have noticed if it had have been her, given the amount of coverage.
Indeed.
Anyway, the long and short is they're probably going to want to speak to the whole gang of us, so .
.
I just thought that I ought to let you know.
Yeah, no worries.
Obviously, they're looking for people who may have seen something that only now seems relevant.
But I told them we all stayed in the house that night, eating with our families, so Yeah, yeah, absolutely.
I'll give Pete a bell and maybe you could give Chris the heads up? Sure.
And I've e-mailed some dates for our meet-up.
Oh, yeah, I saw.
Erm .
.
I can do any of those.
Excellent! Speak soon, mate.
Yeah, cheers, Jamie.
Jamie sends his love.
How is he? Oh, he's very well.
He's just, er trying to arrange a get-together.
The four amigos.
That'll be nice.
Yeah, it will.
It's been too long.
Much too long.
Of course I remember.
I was meant to have bought the puddings and I forgot, so I legged it to the corner shop and bought a load of Cornettos, which your ex wasn't too happy about.
Anyway, I just wanted to check that you remembered it the same as I did.
So, we're all ready for the 22nd.
Chris has replied now so I'll book a table and send you all a link.
Just one quick thing before you go, Jamie.
Actually, I'm literally just heading into a meeting, mate.
Yeah, yeah, I'll be ten seconds.
Jamie I need a massive favour.
I was married for, er .
.
12 years and I had have, I have a daughter, Maya, who I last saw 17 years ago.
My marriage ended early 2000.
And because of some issues that I had at the time, my wife Laura, she felt it was damaging for Maya to be around that.
And I'd run up some debts.
So I went from living in a nice house in Notting Hill to .
.
a one-bedroom flat in Acton .
.
and then a hostel and .
.
and then the streets.
How long were you homeless? On and off for seven years.
Oh, Chris I'm so sorry.
SHE SIGHS And you had no friends who could have helped you? Yeah.
Yeah.
I had friends who would have been desperate to help me.
Yeah, but you have to want to be helped.
And I didn't.
I hated myself.
I thought I deserved everything that happened to me.
And your marriage .
.
the issues you mention? OK, so .
.
as you know, I have bipolar disorder, which was undiagnosed at the time, and so it was unmedicated, which meant that .
.
you know, my behaviour was challenging.
And as soon as I started costing my company money, it was inevitable I'd be asked to step down.
HE CHUCKLES And that was just not what she had married, an unemployed man who had mental health issues.
So she asked me to leave.
And I did.
And then, 18 months later, she married a hedge fund manager, who bought her a house in Holland Park, so And then, in 2012 .
.
Maya wrote to tell me that Laura had died from breast cancer .
.
and to ask that I stay away from the funeral.
I thought about writing back, and saying that I was better now, that I was a different person.
And I am.
But I think there comes a time when you have to accept how things have turned out.
That life can sometimes simply be unfair.
And to keep resisting that .
.
it takes so much energy, Mila.
Energy that you need for the future.
Love? In here.
Hey, Pete.
Hello, Mark.
What a lovely lady your missus is.
I was just about to call you.
You're punching above your weight there, buddy.
Three grand.
And my apologies.
I was stressed about some deals and screwed up the paperwork.
I accidentally paid Salthouse's cheque into my personal account.
But, er .
.
there it is.
All there.
You know what we used to call blokes like Pete, Maria? Filth.
Failed in London, tried Hong-Kong.
Bit of a Wild West out there, wasn't it, mate? Attracted a very distinct sort of person.
I see you, buddy.
Lovely to meet you, Maria.
I'll let myself out.
DOOR CLOSES I'm sorry about that.
I need a shower.
This isn't working, Pete.
You and me.
I'm sorry, but .
.
this just isn't what I thought I was buying.
It'll get better, babes.
Trust me.
I've got some really good business coming in.
CAR DOOR CLOSES Oh, I forgot to say, I've got a couple of guests arriving.
Can you show them in, please, Liz? Yes.
Thanks.
Adrian Have you got five minutes? Well, obviously I recognise her, but I don't recall ever seeing her at the house at any point.
As Jamie said, if we had have seen her, we would have discussed it at the time.
It was a huge story.
Absolutely.
Er, so .
.
Mr Hollis, he told us that the four of you had gone down on your own, at first, to play golf.
Yes.
And then your wife Derran and your girls arrived on the 31st.
Yes.
And how old were they, the kids? Er, Claire would have been eight and Emma just turned ten.
I'm sorry, just to go back on one thing.
New Year's, the kids would have gone to bed at? Er, nine, ten, maybe.
And no-one went out after that? Nope.
What car where you driving back then, Dr Finch? Erm .
.
I had my Audi in '99, I think.
An A4.
Sorry, was that the saloon or? No, the estate.
We needed the space for holidays and stuff.
To save faffing around with a top box or a trailer or any of that.
And what colour was it? Silver.
And your wife and kids, they went down by train? With Jamie's wife and son.
And everybody headed back to London on the 2nd? Yes.
Did you all live in London then? All except Pete.
He lived in Hong Kong.
And your marriage to Derran, that ended when? What relevance has when my marriage ended to anything? Sorry.
If any question makes you feel uncomfortable, you don't have to answer.
We separated in 2001.
OK.
And do you remember when Mr Hollis and his wife separated? Same year, I think.
Or maybe 2000.
And Chris Lowe and his wife? Yeah, roughly the same time.
And are you still in contact with Derran, if we wanted to speak with her? I haven't seen Derran for many years, but I can get a number from my kids, if you need it.
That would be very helpful, thank you.
Oh, I should just say that, er .
.
she's had a number of issues over the last couple of decades, depression, anxiety and so, erm .
.
I'm not entirely sure you'll find her the most reliable of narrators.
OK.
Well, thank you for that.
And then, one last thing, and, er I should say, do feel free to say no.
But in order to help eliminate you from our enquiries, how would you feel about giving us a DNA swab? Yes, of course.
No problem.
So, if nobody went out after ten, then it can't be them.
I mean, we know Hayley was seen alive at 12:10, so Yeah, I think you're right.
And if we're spinning our wheels on these guys, I don't want to waste any more time.
Let's take the last two separately.
Hi, Dad, it's me.
Look, I'm really sorry, I'm going to be a bit late.
Please call me.
How many times have you been here before, Jamie? It'll be fine.
You know, the longer this goes on .
.
the more his problems .
.
consume him.
The more you look at the paths we took, the choices we made, I made .
.
and think .
.
was it then? Was it that choice .
.
or that choice .
.
that messed everything up? Was it then .
.
that I ruined my child's life? JAMIE ON PHONE: Call me.
GENERAL CHATTER Sometimes, I just ROOM FALLS SILEN Hi Hello.
Gemma left some school books at mine, I brought them round.
And then she wanted to show me her room.
Right.
Lovely place, though.
Thank you.
Anyway, I need to shoot off.
Nice to see you.
And you.
Bye, girls.
Bye.
Bye.
Yeah, well, you see, I'm from the clip-round-the-ear-hole generation.
I think he'd still like to, to be honest.
Oh, dear.
And do you have children? No! Never had the urge to be a mother.
Wow.
Smart move.
Tell me about it.
They take so much from you, don't they? Not sure I'd see it quite like.
Just, I'm too selfish, I think.
Yeah? Liked my career too much.
I think, if you are going to have children, you need to be around.
Whoops.
Well, yes.
I mean, an evening like tonight, it's fine you letting us down, but how did you cope when that was your kids, turning up two hours late for supper? Oh, we, erm muddled through.
Anyway, Dad tells me you're off to Venice at the weekend.
I know.
You should tell him to stop spoiling me.
I should.
And first class, too.
Venice? HE LAUGHS THEY ALL LAUGH Right.
Yeah.
Funny.
Very funny.
Actually that's not quite what I said.
OK.
I have it here, you said you saw her leave just after midnight.
No, I said she would have left just after her shift ended at midnight.
I never said I actually saw her.
Right.
Guy Halford, the manager, he's the one who actually saw her.
Sorry.
And so what was the last time you saw her? Just before 11.
I was working through till three and I took a half-hour break then.
When Guy came back, he put me in the bar and I just presumed that Hayley was finishing up in the restaurant.
And Guy Halford, does he still live in Middenham? Hi.
Hi.
I'm looking for Christopher Lowe.
Hello.
Go on Stay there.
Stay.
Mr Carr? Yeah.
DI Sunny Khan.
Have you got five minutes? No, I'm Sorry.
OK.
Absolutely sure? Yeah.
You know who she is, though? Yeah.
Of course, yeah.
I mean, I never saw her in that house.
Are you OK, Mr Lowe? Yeah.
Yeah, I just I don't cope with stress very well.
Would you prefer to have someone with you? No.
No.
No, I'm fine for now.
OK.
So we're just asking everyone we speak to a number of general questions to help us with our enquiries.
So, can you tell me what car you were driving that week? I didn't take a car.
I went down with Tim.
And then, did you and your family travel back with him or? My wife drove down with our daughter and we went back in her car.
Right.
So what car was she driving? She would have been driving the Maserati.
Right.
You know what? I think I did see her at the house.
Right.
Are you sure? Yeah.
Just one time, but, er .
.
she's got a distinctive face, I guess.
I think that was her.
OK.
Was that on your own or? Erm, I'd come back from a round early.
I was still a bit jet-lagged, so I went back to the house for a kip.
Er, when I walked in, she was there, hoovering.
I said hello and asked if there was anything else she could do, cos of the noise.
What day would this have been? Oh I'd have to check a calendar.
Do you know when it was rented from? Yeah.
Er .
.
Monday the 27th.
Monday.
Well, we arrived in the evening, I remember that.
I think we just chilled the next day, had a couple of bevvies in the local and played our first round the day after.
So I'm thinking the Wednesday.
Just to go back to the conversation with her, was it just about the hoovering, was it? Yeah.
When I woke up, the other lads were back and she'd gone.
And you didn't discuss this with any of the others? Discuss what? That this girl .
.
who later went missing, had been in the house you all rented.
No.
I mean, I drove back to London on the 2nd and then flew out to Hong Kong first thing the next day, so This was a big story? It was huge.
It was in all the national newspapers for weeks.
Right, well, I had no idea about that.
And her photo being on the front pages the last couple of days.
Work's been pretty crazy.
I haven't had time to look at the papers.
I'm sorry, but the first I've ever heard of this girl is, er now.
I suppose one of us would have cooked and then all of us, with kids, I mean, would have eaten together.
And that was a pleasant evening? Yeah.
Everyone had a nice time? Yeah, we had a nice time.
Why do you ask that? Well, just Because Christmas and New Year can be quite stressful, can't it? And I understand your marriage broke down not long after.
What has that got to do with anything? Well, I wondered if that was in any way connected to something that happened on this break.
You know, I think I do, I do need someone with me.
Mm.
And I can arrange that.
Of course.
But can you answer that question, please? Because I'm aware that, of the three of you that were married, all of you were separated within the year.
No, that was, that was, that was nothing to do with anything that happened on that break.
So Sure.
Who's that? That's my girlfriend and her son.
I want to stop now, please.
One more thing.
Lastly, we're asking everyone that we speak to how they'd feel about providing a DNA swab.
Entirely voluntary of course.
How would you feel about that? Not a problem.
Good.
It won't take a minute.
Mr Mullery, DC Jake Collier.
Have you got five minutes for a quick chat, sir? Now, you'll have my home address, but you decided to come here because you thought what? That I'd be embarrassed and gratefully duck into some car so no-one saw? I just want to ask a few quick questions, sir.
So a couple of hours ago, the head suggested that maybe I should take some leave.
Some of the parents have been uncomfortable with the situation.
And, of course, I could refuse because she has no legal right.
But do you know what? I have spent the past 18 years telling people that I wasn't even charged, that not one single piece of evidence could ever be found to incriminate me, that the lead detective retired just before a misconduct case could be brought against him.
So I am knackered and I'll take the paid break, thank you very much.
But what it also means is that I am not remotely fucking embarrassed, mate.
I'm not remotely embarrassed to stand here and tell you loudly, no, I will not talk to you.
I will not sit in a car or a room or anywhere with you, voluntarily, ever.
And if you want to arrest me, be my guest.
But I'll not say another fucking word to you.
Not even, "No comment.
" Because I think the police are scum.
I think you lie.
I think you break the law.
I think you take bribes and you sell stories.
But worse than that, most unforgiveable of all, I think you're thick.
I think your ranks are made up of dim-witted mediocrity who joined the force because they want power but they're too stupid to get employed anywhere else.
So shame on you .
.
for the way you treated me .
.
for letting Hayley down so catastrophically.
And shame on you, DC Jake Collier for becoming a police officer.
And how sure did he seem? Pretty sure.
It was an instinctive reaction.
I don't think he was recognising her from the newspapers.
So this definitively places her in the house, possibly with all four men, before the wives and kids arrived? Yeah.
What was he like otherwise? Odd.
An odd mixture.
I mean, I guess you've got to ask, why would he be telling me that he saw Hayley in the house if he had something to hide? But But when I asked him if he'd give a DNA swab, he slightly looked like he'd just shat himself.
What's his background? Er Lived and worked in Hong Kong for 25 years.
Only married for the first time six years ago.
No previous convictions, at least not here.
Ah Drove down to Middenham on a motorbike.
Do we have a response from James Hollis about his car yet? I'll chase that.
Er, how was your man? So, erm He lives in a camper van.
Oh.
I'd say he's definitely had some mental health issues, looks like he hasn't got a pot to piss in.
Except, in 1999, he was CEO of DDM Lowe, his own advertising agency.
And this is a guy who got a double first from Cambridge, was basically a bit of a genius through his life, lived in a five million quid house in Notting Hill.
Wow.
When did he leave? Early 2000.
"To pursue new challenges.
" What, like, how to live in a car park? PHONE JINGLE DCI Stuart.
Hello, I'm just returning your call.
It's Mel Hollis here.
I'm James Hollis' ex-wife.
Ah, Mrs Hollis.
Yeah, thanks for returning my call.
No, it wasn't a pleasant evening.
What it was was a train wreck.
In what way? Look the meal was fine, we ate, we cleared up, the kids were knackered, it'd been a long day getting there, so they went to bed about 9:30.
Which was good.
That they were in bed, I mean, because they didn't have to see Chris go completely nuts, for want of a better word.
How do you mean? Out of the blue, he just started ranting about his life, his marriage, his friends .
.
how it all meant nothing, how everything was an illusion.
It was quiet terrifying.
Wow, yeah, I can imagine.
And, so what did people do? Well, I mean, we all tried to calm him down, obviously, particularly Laura his wife.
But he was flailing his arms and shouting and To be honest, we were all quite relieved when he then just suddenly walked out.
Of the house? Mm-hm.
And went where? I don't know.
Had he been drinking? Well, he'd had a few.
We'd all had a few.
It was New Year's Eve.
Anything else? Someone might have bought some coke.
I don't know, maybe he'd had a bit of that.
OK.
So who was taking coke? Not me.
Not any of the women, actually.
Tim Finch? Definitely not, no.
He never did that.
Pete, no, he was more of a drinker.
James yes.
In fact, I think it was him that probably bought it.
When Chris went out of the house, what time would that have been? I don't know.
Just after ten, I guess.
And did anyone go after him? Yeah, after a minute or two .
.
er, James and Tim.
Did they catch up with him? No.
No, Chris came back on his own about an hour and a half later.
He was absolutely drenched.
I mean, it was raining hard at this point and his clothes were covered with mud and he went straight upstairs to bed.
No explanation, no apology, nothing.
Right.
Where was Pete Carr at this point? Pete had been out since right after the meal, trying his luck at the pub.
Trying his luck? The ladies.
He got back just after midnight.
On his own? Mm-hm.
And pissed.
And your husband and Dr Finch? The same.
No, they got back just before midnight.
Just in time for Auld Lang Syne, bless.
Were they separate or together? I can't remember.
And what happened then? The guys went to bed, the women stayed up and talked about our car crash marriages.
OK.
This is really important, Ms Hollis, so .
.
I want you to think very carefully, please.
Did you see anyone go out again after that? No.
No-one went out again after that.
You sound very certain.
Firstly, I sat up talking to Laura and Derran till about three o'clock in the morning, and then I wasn't going to sleep with James that night, so I slept on the sofa.
Except, I didn't, really.
Sleep, I mean.
So that meant I would have seen if anyone had gone out.
And they didn't.
Right.
Fuck.
The last sighting of her was after they were all back in the house.
So she could be lying.
Yep.
Or mistaken.
Maybe she did sleep and one of them came down at four or five or whatever and then went out.
Except, if one of them came down at four or five, went out then and killed her, where .
.
where was Hayley between leaving the pub at 12:10 and four or five? No, that feels wrong.
Yeah, maybe.
But not as wrong as all four men having clearly lied to us through their teeth.
There is that.
I need a drink.
There is that.
SHE TYPES Yeah, it was about ten past, maybe quarter past midnight.
Enough time to change, anyway.
For the party? Yeah.
Cos she went as Madonna, the Desperately Seeking Susan one.
You know, all the slap and the hair and everything.
It was an '80s theme, I think.
Sorry, just a sec.
Sure.
This is from Hayley's diary.
"I hate the '80s, I hate fancy dress, so am going as ME!! "They should be so lucky.
Lucky, lucky, lucky!!" Maybe she changed her mind.
Were there any other female staff going to the party who would have been the same age, same build as Hayley? PHONE JINGLE Hey Hey, Fran, what's up? There was another employee, same build, same colouring, same hair as Hayley, who's just confirmed to me that she went as Madonna and she left around 12:10.
So you think the manager saw her leaving, not Hayley? I think it has to be a very strong possibility.
Which means the last confirmed sighting of Hayley was way earlier.
At 11, after which she could easily have bunked off work early.
OK, this is brilliant work, Fran.
Let's talk first thing tomorrow.
Goodnight, boss.
You heard that? So she could actually have left the pub earlier.
At 11.
Which means we now have four men, variously pissed, drugged up and possibly mentally unstable, out somewhere in Middenham, at exactly the same time as Hayley.