DCI Banks Aftermath Episode Scripts

N/A - Friend of the Devil (1)

DCI Banks Friend of the Devil Season 2 - Episode 03 Part 1 - Hello? - Annie, it's Alan.
I need your help.
I call you because a body's been found up on Eastvale Moor.
I don't have all the details yet.
It's stupid o'clock on a Sunday morning.
It's my first day off in a month.
It's 10:30.
This is your chance to lead an investigation.
- SIO.
- What, for a lost rambler? Have you got something better to do? Is that any of your business? That isn't what I meant.
'Look, Eastvale Moor's your territory.
You take it.
I can't.
We think we might have a body off one of the alleys off the main square in Eastvale.
Shit.
Give me a couple of minutes.
A bloke called Timothy Randall reported finding the body at 8:15 this morning.
It's his store room.
He owns the gift shop on the square.
What was he doing in that store room? Said he was doing a stock take.
At 8:15 on a Sunday morning? Was the door locked before she was put in there? Yeah, Randall said it was.
- Morning, Doctor.
- Banks.
Is that all she was wearing? It's bloody freezing.
Kids today! The cold would have slowed down rigor mortis, but I'd say she was killed after midnight.
Maybe as late as two.
Not likely later.
- You think she was killed in here? - Looks like it.
Strangulation was the probable cause of death.
Well, there's a chance someone could have heard something.
I doubt it.
There's a chance she was raped, too.
So, she didn't end up in this position herself? No.
Based on the lividity pattern, I'd say that he moved her some time after he killed her.
So, why would the sod who did this have gone to the trouble of making it look like she was sleeping? Hayley Daniels.
I'll put it in.
Juicy one, isn't it, sir? Please don't do that, Kevin.
You're not that type.
Track down the local sex offenders - those on the books and those we think should be.
- Yes, sir.
- Don't go yet.
One witness, a newsagent, said he saw Randall go into the alley at 8:05.
- 8:05? - By the square's clock.
- It's accurate.
- But you say that Randall - reported the body at - 8:15.
So, why did it take him ten minutes to walk from the alley entrance to here, when it only took us 30 seconds? Kevin, there's CCTV cameras everywhere.
Get everything you can on last night.
Every entrance in, every exit out.
Now you can go.
- Sir? - Her name's Hayley Daniels.
You inform the family.
I'll go and see Randall.
Been here before, haven't we? Yeah.
What harm could she have been to anyone? I'll bet she wasn't always in a wheelchair.
- You got an ID on her? - No.
No ID.
No money.
No jewellery, rings.
Nothing on her at allma'am.
- How old do you think she is? - Hard to tell, ma'am.
But no doubt the sort of injury that would have put her in the chair - that would have aged her.
But look past the hair and the complexion, and I'd say no older than you.
Right, yes.
Very good.
First day as SIO.
But can we keep focused, please? You found a weapon? - Not so far.
- What type do you think was used? Well, I'd say a thin, very sharp blade.
Maybe a straight razor or a surgical instrument.
Ma'am.
Three care homes in the area.
Nearest one's a few miles away - Mapston Hall.
Why here? Someone's killed her in the exact place that Marcus and Lucy Payne buried their last victim.
Because it's a remote spot.
That's why those two chose it.
It could be a copycat.
Or some sick sod's idea of a joke.
Just what you've always wanted, Annie.
Your own murder.
I could see my store room had been broken into.
I thought she was just sleeping at first.
- Poor girl.
- Very dedicated of you, Mr.
Randall, to be working so early on a Sunday morning.
Sign of the times.
I had to let my help go, so I'm at the shop now from Monday to Saturday.
Sunday's my only chance to catch up.
Otherwise, I'd be in church.
It's a very small store room.
Couldn't you do your stock-taking after church? My dear wife passed away a year ago.
I suppose I try to find ways to keep busy.
And between you and me, Mr.
Banks, I don't mind an excuse to miss church now.
They mean well, but there's such a thing as too much sympathy.
How often do you do a stock-take? - Monthly.
- So, your records would show that you did one a month ago? - Yes.
- Do you mind if I have a look? What time is it, please, Mr.
Randall? 11:43.
It's a 30-second walk from the entrance to the alley to your store room.
You say you found the body at 8:15.
Yes, I checked my watch.
Force of habit.
But you were seen going into the alleys at 8:05, so what happened in those extra ten minutes, Mr.
Randall? I didn't know there were an extra ten minutes.
- I didn't know any of this until you - - No, you made a point of checking your watch, and I know it's accurate, because you just told me the time.
So, what did you do in those extra ten minutes, Mr.
Randall? I lost my wife last year, so if I'm confused - You're not confused.
You lied.
I certainly did not.
Did something happen last night? - Last night? - Did something happen last night that made you rush to your store room this morning? No.
Look, I've had a hell of a shock to my system.
By rights, I should - It's mine! Mine! Give it back now.
- No! Pack it in, or I'll come up and belt you! Just let Michael have it for five minutes! Bloody kids! Why do we bother, eh? Mrs.
Daniels, is your husband home? No.
He's at a sales convention all weekend.
Why? I really need to speak to your husband, as well.
Has something happened? Mrs.
Daniels, I'm sorry, but We've found the body of a girl .
.
we believe could be your daughter.
I need you to see if you could identify her.
Mum! Mum! It's not fair! The front desk think the room phone might be off the hook.
Mr.
Daniels hasn't checked out yet.
He might have gone without paying.
They try that sometimes.
We have got his details, though.
Right.
Who the bloody hell are you?! Police.
Are you Geoff Daniels? Yeah.
And you'd better have a bloody good reason for being here.
Geoff! Geoff! I love you.
Call me if you need me.
Not your usual NHS setup.
Where the rich dump the relatives they don't want any more.
Anyone who leaves the building with a friend or relatives has to be signed out when they leave and signed back in when they return.
Usually, we have a few out on a Sunday morning, but the weather's been so unsettled.
There was one signed out at nine this morning and not been signed back in.
Karen Drew, signed out by someone named Mary.
That's right.
I authorised it.
But they must be back.
Mary said they'd be an hour.
Did Mary tell you her surname? I'm sorry.
I can't remember.
But it'll be right there in the book.
- It's illegible.
- Is it possible that Karen Drew's back and not been signed in? It's possible.
Right.
I'd like the names of her next of kin, please.
- They'll be in the front office.
- Ken.
And I'd like to see Karen's room.
What did Mary look like? There was a downpour.
We had to get everyone in.
I didn't really look.
- Did Mary arrive with anyone else? - No, she was on her own.
She seemed so nice.
Oh, God, it must be a mistake.
Karen must be back in her room.
There's no personal stuff here.
It's not that unusual.
Some of our clients have no contact with the outside world at all.
How did Karen react to the idea of a walk with Mary? - What do you mean? - Did she seem pleased? Do you think Karen knew Mary? But you don't understand.
Karen was here because a drunk driver hit her.
She was completely paralysed.
She couldn't communicate at all.
Just lots of medical stuff in her file.
No next of kin.
Only contact is a solicitor that pays for it all.
It could be for money.
It's not cheap keeping someone here.
If for money, then why not push her off a cliff? Why take her to Eastvale Moor and cut her throat? And why in that exact spot? So, Hayley's last night was a bit of a pub crawl.
She started off with some friends from college over there at the Red Lion.
- What time did she get there? - Just after 7:30.
Stayed for about two hours.
The barmaid reckons they had three or four pints each.
Including Hayley? She reckons Hayley had the most.
Well, the tox report show she had amphetamine in her system.
She could have probably drunk us all under the table.
Did anything happen there? Sounds like they were getting a bit rowdy.
Hayley attracted a lot of male attention - not that you can blame anyone, the way she was dressed.
- Prat.
- All right.
That's enough.
You three, retrace the step, start at The Red Lion.
Talk to as many of the men that were staring at Hayley as you can.
Then do the rest of the pubs.
Let's focus, shall we, Kevin? - Where next, Win? - The Bay Horse.
They had three or four pints each.
But the barman refused to serve Hayley.
Said she was being obnoxious with lots of customers.
Did she get into any fights? No, her friends took her out.
- Where next? - The Black Bull.
- Have you talked to the barman? - Not yet - he wasn't around.
They were next seen at the Bar None on the other side of the alleys, but Hayley wasn't with them.
Right.
That's Hayley leaving the Black Bull with her friends.
She clearly doesn't want to go on to the Bar None.
Do we have anyone going in or out of the alleys by any other route? Not yet, sir, but we've still a few to check.
Is there any other way in or out that isn't covered by CCTV? Well, some bars have back entrances - that aren't covered.
- I did find this, sir.
That's Jamie Morden, the barman of The Black Bull.
It's 2:30 in the morning.
The Black Bull's licensed till midnight.
Two and a half hours to clean up? Right.
I'll talk to Hayley's friends.
Find out why they were arguing outside the Black Bull and why she went into the alleys alone.
Now, Hayley had condoms in her handbag.
Maybe she was going on to meet a boyfriend.
Worth keeping in mind.
Win, go back to Hayley's parents.
See if they can fill in any gaps.
Kevin, you go with Winsome.
Then go to The Black Bull.
Find out why Jamie Morden was locking up so late and if anything happened while Hayley was in there.
- Sir.
- OK.
Are you sure you'll be all right? Thanks, Malcolm.
- I'll see you tomorrow.
- Goodbye.
Sorry - can I help you? DCI Alan Banks.
Are you one of their dads? No, Malcolm Austin.
I used to teach Hayley at college.
Look, I'm not sure this is a good time - they're all really upset.
I have done this before unfortunately.
Eryou were all arguing with Hayley outside The Black Bull.
Hayley wanted to go for a pee in t'alleys.
And we were like, 'Don't be so scuzzy.
' But she was all, 'Don't tell me what to do.
' That's all the argument was.
Then she went into the alleys and Why didn't she wait until you went to the Bar None? She wasn't coming to the Bar None.
Well, why didn't she use the toilets in the pub where you'd just been? The toilets were out of order.
You asked the barman if she could use the toilet upstairs, didn't you? - Stuart? - Yeah.
He said, OK, fine.
She could use the bog.
But he'd have to come up with her.
Why? Make sure she didn't pass out or something.
Hayley was hammered and she lost it with him.
In what way? Yelling at him - dickhead, twat.
I don't know.
Stuff like that.
And how did the barman take that? Just said we should leave.
Could Hayley have been going to meet a boyfriend? Hayley didn't have a boyfriend.
And you all spent the evening together in the Bar None? Yeah.
All night.
I have to talk to them.
Be brave for Hayley.
Everything all right, love? I was just asking your wife, sir, if Hayley might have been heading to a boyfriend's on Saturday night.
Hayley didn't have a boyfriend.
Where you aware that she carried condoms in her bag? Hayley was 18.
Come here to drag our name through the mud, have you? Why would we go through her bag? Please understand - this isn't personal.
You're saying, if we'd known her better, - she'd wouldn't be dead.
- I'm not saying - If Hayley had a boyfriend, she would have told Donna, and Donna would have told me! We don't have secrets in this family! - What's that supposed to mean? - It doesn't mean anything! I told you - these bastards aren't here to help us! Go on - sod off, the pair of you! Sorry.
We haven't met.
DCI Alan Banks.
Elizabeth Waring.
This bruising here indicates he knelt on her while he strangled her.
These bruises indicate he strangled her manually, from the front.
No ligature.
Like this.
Are you sure it was a man? Hayley suffered multiple vaginal lesions, indicating she was raped.
Any chance of DNA? I've swabbed her body externally and internally and sent samples to the lab.
Was she restrained? There's no significant bruising to the wrists or ankles.
Did she struggle? These people don't need to tie up their victims.
They say they know where their families live or give them a sliver of hope they won't kill them when it's over.
They've got a million ways of making their victims do what they want.
Yes.
I was thinking of DNA under the fingernails.
I don't think we should hold out too much hope.
As you can see, Hayley bit her nails to the quick.
Sorry.
Shall we get some air? - Are you new to the job? - Yeah, six months in.
Are you going to tell me that in time I'll learn to disconnect? I'd be lying if I did.
What did you do before? I was a doctor in a trauma unit.
Why the switch to here? Surely there there must have been some hope? My unit specialised in violent injuries.
Horrible stuff, the worst.
I got to the point where I couldn't take another victim dying.
Sorry - I still don't follow.
Surely, every victim that comes to you here - But I can help them here.
What I couldn't take was knowing the dead could never point a finger at the people who'd killed them.
I wanted to use my skills to try to make their wounds speak for them.
If that makes any sense.
Yes.
It does.
Then someone like Hayley comes in and I wonder if bringing them to justice is worth anything.
It feels like that sometimes, doesn't it? What can I do for you? We'd like to talk about your client Karen Drew.
I'm not going to divulge information about my client.
- Why not? - If I told you that, you'd know why I can't tell you.
Right.
Now you've got that off your chest I'm not sure Karen Drew would care about client confidentiality right now.
We just found her body on the moors.
Someone slit her throat.
So, names and addresses of her next of kin, please.
Karen Drew wasn't her real name.
It was Lucy Payne.
- Annie.
- Hey.
Not disturbing you, am I? No, it's good to see you.
Not interrupting anything? No.
- Glass of wine? - No, I'm good.
Not a social call, then? Alan, I wanted you to hear it from me first.
The body you sent me out to on Eastvale Moor - it was Lucy Payne.
What, you mean another Lucy Payne? No.
Just back off! All of you! Lucy Payne admitted to, and was found guilty by a jury, for the abduction and murder of five girls.
Lucy Payne's in prison for life.
They'd have told me if she'd escaped.
It can't be her.
Two weeks into her sentence, Lucy was attacked by fellow inmates.
- Because they recognised her? - Probably.
- So they just let her go? - No.
Social services gave her a new name, a cover story, and hid her in Mapston Hall.
Her attackers - they chucked bleach on her, cut her up, severed her spinal cord.
She was paralysed for life - she couldn't talk, walk, communicate.
I didn't even recognise her.
Lucy Payne confessed to her crime.
She accepted justice.
Why wouldn't you rape, torture and murder those girls, hm? What was your answer? Help me please.
Feel something.
I want to plead guilty.
Justice failed.
Alan, I know what it did to you, when you got her to admit she knew what she'd done.
But someone took her out, slit her throat, while she was sat in her wheelchair, paralysed, unable to defend herself.
And that's wrong, whatever she did.
And it needs to be investigated.
Yeah.
- Are you sure? - No, I'm driving.
You don't have to.
I meant you could take a taxi.
Yeah.
I need a clear head for the morning.
I'm gonna take this to Rydell.
Get the backup I need to do the job.
Well, you know who the suspects are - the families of Lucy Payne's victims.
The job will be to bring up all that grief and misery again.
I know.
I'm gonna do my job, Alan.
Can I count on you? Yeah.
Lucy Payne didn't deserve that.
- Morning, Annie.
- Morning.
No wonder you didn't recognise her.
What with the scarring and the new identity.
Which didn't work.
Do you want to run this one? No.
I think I'm done with Lucy Payne.
Sir.
Barmaid at The Red Lion said she saw an old bloke staring at Hayley the whole time she was there.
She thought he was the local shopkeeper.
Timothy Randall.
I'll catch you up.
Are you all right, Kevin? What did you get from Jamie Morden at The Black Bull? He's my first call this morning, sir.
Is this about Hayley? Drinking won't help, mate.
Believe me - it'll just make things worse.
It's just getting to me.
Hayley's killer's still out there, and we aren't getting anywhere.
We go through all the evidence.
We're thorough and methodical.
We eliminate, then we go through it all again.
We'll catch Hayley's killer.
That's our job.
Not happy to see us, Mr.
Randall? I've told you everything I know.
Did you go for a drink when you finished work on Saturday? - I went to the Red Lion, yes.
- Didn't tell us everything, then? - Well, I didn't see it was relevant.
- Right See Hayley Daniels while you were in there, did you? How do I know that? I wouldn't have recognised her.
- Sir, I'm very sorry about this.
- I should think so, too.
It's just, the barmaid said she saw you ogling Hayley.
- I was doing no such thing! - Oh, come on.
Young, beautiful girl like that.
I bet you'd set your sights on her from the start, hadn't you? - You can't speak to me like this.
- You lied to the police in the course of investigation.
No, I said I didn't recognise her, not that I didn't notice her.
This is different.
I mean, how could anyone not notice her? All bare legs and tummy and And you just hung around for a few hours and followed her into the alleys? Is that it? I've tried my best to help you.
I'm not saying another word without my solicitor.
Hello? - Jamie Morden? - Yeah.
You from the police? Yeah.
So, rough night in here Saturday night, was it? No, average.
Apart from the girl who got killed was here.
That's why you're here - right? - Did you know her? - Hayley Daniels? Not really, no.
She'd come in with her mates a couple of times a month, but I can't say I knew her.
Have you got the bastard who did it? How were they when they were in here? Drunk - it was Saturday night.
Did anything happen? You mean the blocked bogs? Yeah, she wanted to use the toilet upstairs.
I said she could, but I said I'd come up with her as well.
I didn't want her puking all over the place.
No disrespect, but she was drunk off her tits.
So, she goes ballistic at me, telling me not to tell her what to do, which I hadn't, anyway.
And is that all you said to her? How do you mean? That you just wanted to go upstairs to make sure she didn't wreck it.
Course that's all I said, or I would have told you, would I? This is a murder investigation, so I'll ask the questions and you answer them - have you got that? Aye.
Morden says he didn't leave the pub until 2:30 in the morning, because he was cleaning the toilets up after vandals, sir.
How many exits from the pub into the alleys at the back? Well, there's the back door and the beer cellar, but they're both covered by CCTV.
He didn't show up on anything until we got him cycling off at 2:30.
- Anything else? - He's cocky .
.
but his story matched the one Stuart Kinsey gave us.
He was just a bit vague on what Hayley called him when she lost it.
If that means anything, sir.
Well, even if it did, everything's on camera.
Right, back on with the surveillance.
And Kevin - that's good work.
Hit on Stuart Kinsey, sir.
One of Hayley's friends.
He was cautioned six months ago for dealing speed.
Maybe that's where Hayley got hers from.
Kevin, come with me.
Stuart, Stuart Oh, don't run! Kevin! Why were you running out of the alleys the night Hayley died? All right, yeah.
After we got to the Bar None, I felt crap about Hayley going alone in the alleys.
I said I was going to the bar, and nipped out through the back, just to make sure she was OK.
So, why didn't you tell us this? You knew Hayley was high on speed because you gave it to her.
You went back there because you knew she was vulnerable and alone.
What? You think I killed Hayley? Well, did you, Stuart? No! I'd never do anything to hurt Hayley.
I was in love with her.
And did Hayley know this? I told her, yeah.
Did she reject you? - How did that make you feel? - How do you think? I don't know.
You tell us.
- Angry? - No, no! Stop! None of this is true.
Right.
This is what I've got - you felt humiliated because Hayley rejected you.
You lied to us about going into the alley to follow Hayley, and we've got you on CCTV running out of the alley two minutes after Hayley was raped and murdered.
So, if that's not the truth, then tell us what is! All right.
I went back because I thought Hayley had a boyfriend.
I went into the alleys to see if she was meeting him.
I wanted to know who he was.
- And did you find her? - No.
Please, I swear I looked for her, but she wasn't there.
Why did you run? I heard a door slam .
.
and a muffled scream.
I could have saved Hayley.
It's OK.
You couldn't have known what was happening.
Do you have any idea who Hayley's boyfriend might be? A few weeks ago I bumped into Hayley in a pub out of town.
She was with Malcolm Austin, our tutor.
They were sitting in a corner, and Malcolm practically had his tongue down Hayley's throat.
Hey! Get off him, mate! Are you all right? Leave him! What were you thinking? Is he hurt badly? No.
You'll probably get off with common assault.
What good are you to your family in prison? They need you.
Right.
If it was your kid raped and strangled .
.
tell me you wouldn't have done the same.
Nothing from the families of Lucy Payne's victims? Oh, we got plenty.
Mainly that the police let them down but God didn't.
And they hoped Lucy Payne suffered.
Justice done, as far as they're concerned.
Dr.
Waring.
Are you here for the case review? Yes.
Elizabeth, please.
Elizabeth.
It's this way.
Rape and murder of a young girl on our doorstep.
So, what now, Alan? Well, it is possible that Hayley was going to spend the night at her tutor's.
Malcolm Austin, sir.
We're getting background on him.
Then we'll see what he has to say for himself.
Sir Yes, Kevin? It's just the killer wore a condom.
Doesn't that suggest forward planning? I mean, couldn't Hayley Daniels be the first in a series? Well, I've dealt with serial killers.
They're not common.
Most murders are opportunistic.
Yes, but isn't this more about the location? I mean, surely he just waits in the alleys.
He knows a victim will always come by.
- Kevin - Shouldn't we have men - on the alleys, sir? - I think he has a point.
As DCI Banks pointed out, the killer carefully placed Hayley on her side.
In my experience, one-off killers don't go to such trouble.
In the cases that I've dealt with, was similar attempts have been made to cover up a murder, it's because the killer acted on impulse and then panicked.
In the case of Hayley Daniels I'm not looking at a controlled or practised killer.
Hayley was a wonderful, bright young woman.
We've decided to award her diploma posthumously.
It'll mean a lot to her family and - Mr.
Austin Where were you on Saturday night? Me? I was out with friends.
Why? Can you give us their names? Actually, erm I was in.
Sorry.
Were you in or out, Malcolm? In.
Sorry.
Watching telly.
With anyone? - No.
- Waiting for Hayley? No.
Why on earth would I be waiting for Hayley? We've been told that you and Hayley were having an affair.
Yeah.
Whose? Your DNA matches the traces of DNA found on Hayley Daniels' clothes.
That's just not possible.
You picked out Hayley Daniels in the Red Lion, didn't you? Then you waited until you saw her go into the alleys alone.
No! On my life.
No.
You followed her into the alleys, dragged her into your store room and raped her.
- No! - Then, when you'd finished and realised what you'd done, you panicked, and that's when you murdered her.
Pleasecan I just start again? And the next morning, you rushed back to your store room full of remorse, and you tried to make it look like she was sleeping.
Mr.
Banks, I beg you - Why else would you lie to us about those ten minutes? No, no, no, no, no, no! Charge him, Sergeant.
Please believe me - I swear I didn't hurt her! Timothy Randall, you're under arrest for the rape and murder of Hayley Daniels.
You do not have to say anything, but it may harm your defence if you do not mention now something that you may later rely on in court.
- Annie! - Congratulations.
Thank you.
What would you like? A full investigation team and a packet of crisps.
Please.
The man who died - was he going to kill me? You can't think Kevin Templeton was there to rape and murder Chelsea Pilton.
Did you touch the body? Then how do you explain we have a witness that saw you kissing her in the pub? You think do people know what they have in them? And how does that relate to my case? I want to know what I should be looking for.
Could a knife identical to this one have inflicted the wound that killed DC Templeton? So, you can look at a wound and tell if it was inflicted by a man or a woman? Yes.
One of my officers has been murdered.
If you ever try to co-opt something like that for your own ambitions again, you will be out.