Dracula (2013) s01e04 Episode Script

From Darkness to Light

1 (INDISTINCT MUMBLING) (METAL GRAZING) (SNARLING) (GRUNTING) (GASPING FOR BREATH) (BLADES SWISHING) (GRUNTING) RENFIELD: Lady Jayne is a Huntsman.
Seems the Ordo Dracul is more forward-thinking than I gave it credit for.
(SCOFFS) Strange times.
Wonderfully strange.
You'll kill her.
If I kill her, the Order will just send somebody else to replace her.
You'll end it with her.
Now why would I do that? She's a Vampire Hunter.
Renfield, not only will I evade her slightest suspicion, I'll take from her a prize she's given no other man.
Her love.
No.
Something far more precious.
Her trust.
Make a reservation, tomorrow night, 8:00 for two, at the Savoy.
The most exclusive, visible table in the main dining room.
Yes, sir.
(GROWLS) Hello, Master.
JAYNE: Given the extent of the putrefaction, I'd say the female is the youngest.
Five years sired.
Maybe less.
This one, on the other hand, is clearly much older.
A century undead at least.
I mean, that said, neither of the vampires are old enough to be the ones that killed our Seers.
But the one who eluded you? Their sire, I suspect.
Which would make him older still.
Old enough to be the one we're searching for? Oh, he will be a formidable opponent.
- Too formidable? - If so, Mr Browning, then God help you.
Because if I can't kill the beast, no one can.
Josef Cervenka.
My right hand.
Maybe.
A long time ago.
Nonsense.
You are once more under my battlements.
I summoned you here for a reason.
And very soon we shall destroy our greatest enemy.
The Ordo Dracul? The same.
Rich men who've bet their future on oil.
But I've discovered a technology that will destroy them.
- CERVENKA: But they are stronger than ever.
- Precisely.
Just this night, I saw two of my brood slaughtered by a Huntsman, a female of all things.
That's why I need your help.
I know her.
Then we will peel the flesh from her bones.
Not yet.
We cannot defeat them by killing them one by one.
We must attack the source of their power, their wealth.
To pick their pockets like a common thief? There is no honour in that! I'm sorry, sir.
I heard voices.
Renfield, this is my old friend, Josef Cervenka.
He will be staying in this house, for as long as he wishes.
JAYNE: Such a shock.
LORD DAVENPORT: As a boy, Daniel was diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat.
I suppose it was just a matter of time before it gave out.
Still, he was so young to die of a heart attack.
Maybe I should just thank the Lord for the time we did have together.
Mmm.
We shall drape the walls and the ceiling with garlands of peonies and apple blossoms.
What do you think, Harker? Uh, whatever pleases Mina.
HARKER: I want this engagement party to be perfect for her.
- Thank you, Mr Grayson, are you quite sure - Of course.
It'll be my honour to host your engagement party.
WESTENRA: And candelabras.
Silver candelabras everywhere! On the tables and in all the floral arrangements! Candelabras, it will be.
Mina? Mina, darling, come here, I want to show you how you're going to make your entrance.
One moment.
I want you to tell me what you think about General Arthur Ogilvy? It seems he's the military's leading advocate for war against the Ottoman Empire.
- Well, appearances can be deceiving.
- Explain.
In private he opposes the war.
The real advocate is his number two, General Colin Shaw.
A war hero, very popular in the public sphere.
- (GIRLS GIGGLING) - Hmm.
And yet this war hero is willing to spill an ocean of blood to control the region's vast oil reserves.
But General Shaw believes the Ottoman's are a real threat.
You are not suggesting he's advocating war for personal financial gain? He's a puppet.
Powerful men have staked their fortunes on the presumption that the future will be fuelled by oil.
It seems they've not only declared war on the Ottoman Empire, but on Grayson Energy.
You and me.
And everything we've worked so hard for.
MINA: Lucy WESTENRA: You don't walk down the stairs, you glide I want you to find out everything you can about this General Shaw, Harker.
His weaknesses, his failures.
Unless, of course, you'd like to stay here and discuss floral arrangements? (SNICKERS) Leave it with me.
WESTENRA: Mina.
(HEAVY BREATHING) WESTENRA: Fireworks! We must have fireworks with our aperitifs! Lucy, do stop.
You'll make Mr Grayson regret his hospitality.
Nonsense.
We're ready for another test-run.
Ladies, this is my chief engineer, Mr Kowalski.
I'll be down in a minute.
- Is he referring to your resonator machine? - Mmm-hmm.
- Are you testing it now? - Just routine.
If you'd like to stay and watch, you can.
Oh Lord, Mina.
Must we? Miss Westenra.
If you wish to leave, I can easily arrange a second carriage for Miss Murray.
A joy, as always.
I presume everything is in order, Mr Kowalski? Commence stage one.
JOSEPH: Stage one! Mark! (MACHINE POWERING UP) (MINA GIGGLES) JOSEPH: Stage two! Mark! Ah! (GIGGLES) Temperature reading? Steady! Well inside specification! The night of the party, you could've fried an egg on this.
(MINA CRIES OUT) - JOSEPH: Is everyone okay? - Are you unhurt? - We're fine, we're fine.
- MINA: What happened? The cooling system performed perfectly, illustrating the weakest link in the design, the metal used for the casing.
Renfield I'll initiate a survey of all the British steel manufacturers that work with nickel-steel alloys.
GRAYSON: Thank you.
I don't suppose nuts and bolts can measure up to your stock-in-trade.
I'm sorry? Why, flesh and blood, of course.
There can be no higher calling than the practice of medicine.
The ability to save lives makes all our efforts here seem Trivial.
Thank you, Mr Grayson.
CERVENKA: Resemblance? No! She is Ilona.
My wife died four centuries ago.
I know, I was there.
Then, she has been born again and the fates have returned her to you! Now you listen to me, Josef.
You must never again mention Mina Murray's resemblance to my wife.
Do you understand me? Never! To anyone.
- Where are you going? - Out.
(PIANO PLAYING CLASSICAL MUSIC) (CHATTERING) Perhaps a glass of champagne to kill the time? No, thank you.
(CHUCKLES UNDER BREATH) What a lovely surprise.
I'd expect you to be at the florist up to your neck in peonies and apple blossoms.
- Is something wrong? - No.
Mmm.
Listen, um I've been reconsidering the idea of having the engagement party at Carfax.
Why? Well, I I feel uncomfortable.
It's a huge imposition and Well, frankly, I don't understand Mr Grayson's motives for hosting it.
I mean you're just - one of his employees, after all.
- (SCOFFS) Well, I'd like to think I'm a little more than just that.
Yes, of course.
I don't know why he is so interested in In us? He's assumed this very intense involvement in our relationship, as if he's a part of it somehow.
Well, that's because I suppose in a way he is.
When we split up, it was Mr Grayson who took me aside and made me realise what a fool I was.
He made me see you and respect you for who you are.
Not just a prospective wife and mother, but a woman, with aspirations every bit as important as my own.
He did that? Yes.
I didn't want to tell you.
Look, I know you hate all of this bother over arrangements.
- Very much so - So let Lucy handle them.
She lives for it.
All you have to do is turn up on time for the party.
And in the meantime? Bury yourself in work.
You're right.
Of course you're right.
ABRAHAM: Once you've graded those papers, you will find in the University storage 18 recently slaughtered lambs.
Extract the hippocampus from each and prepare them for dissection by the neurology students.
I shall be back in a couple of hours.
Try not to disappoint me.
Is there something wrong? Actually, I'd hoped for something a little less Prosaic.
Now, now, Mina.
We mustn't get ahead of ourselves.
Better to be the tortoise than the hare, yes? Anything but the lamb, I suppose.
What is this? Witchcraft? Science.
If this works, then we shall walk in daylight.
To walk in the sun? CERVENKA: Can you imagine us, Liege? Immortal Invincible by night and by day.
Yes, yes, it is all very thrilling, I'm sure.
Now look.
(GASPS) I can feel the sun.
I can feel its warmth! Master! Argh! No! Josef! No! Yes Yes, it worked.
You call this a success? Don't you see? It works, but only in the tissue surrounding the injection site.
Without a functioning heart, the serum cannot be distributed throughout your body.
All we need now is a dispersion agent.
No! The problem is one of mechanics, not chemistry.
The heart is simply a pump, nothing more.
If we can make mine function, the problem is solved, correct? Yes.
(DOOR CREAKING) - These cells are alive.
- (FOOTSTEPS) WESTENRA: So? Blood cells die within an hour or so of extraction.
This slide is dated 1887.
That's nine years ago! And this is why you couldn't meet me at the florist? That makes no sense.
What I can't understand is how you can maintain such a wilful disinterest in your own engagement party.
What? Honestly, Mina, it's like talking to a man sometimes.
Nose buried in whatever silly thing has captured his attention.
Lucy, what's wrong? I hate this.
Lucy, I I don't understand.
No, you wouldn't, would you? (SNIFFLES) You're not the one attending to every detail for an extravagant party To celebrate the end of the only thing that's ever mattered to her.
- Lucy - It's true.
Things will never be the same.
We will always be friends.
Oh, Mina, darling.
You are so terribly clever, yet so terribly stupid.
No.
You are to be married and That is that.
You understand? No.
I don't.
Get your things, we'll go to the café.
There's a million things to talk about.
I am sorry, sir.
I'm assured my lady will be down presently.
I have all the time in the world.
Sir.
Mr Grayson.
How unexpected.
I must apologise for my absence from dinner at the Savoy.
It was as inexcusable as it was unavoidable.
Oh, please.
I've forgotten about it entirely.
I was hoping I might make amends by requesting the pleasure of your company this evening? If there is one thing I find tiresome about you Americans, it is your relentless optimism.
I promise you a spectacle that you will not soon forget.
Come now, Mr Grayson.
Surely a man of your affluence can find a dinner companion for the evening.
Certainly.
It's just that this particular diversion is beyond the petty refinements of other women.
Only you possess the sensibilities to appreciate it fully.
Your flattery is too obvious.
Flattery is a dull blade that I would never employ against one such as yourself.
This diversion If it displeases me, you will agree not to call on me ever again.
Yes.
Really? (CROWD CLAMOURING) (GRUNTING) (GRUNTING FURIOUSLY) (CHEERS) (JAYNE MOANING) Elsa, from the kitchen.
Oh dear.
I trust she has no close relatives.
Like all our staff, none close enough to note her absence.
Though I will miss her apple crumb cakes.
Bloody Cervenka! I've interviewed three men from Shaw's regiment, two political opponents and an adjutant who was dishonourably discharged.
And none had a bad word to say.
- You sound disappointed.
- No, I'm not disappointed.
It's just I don't understand why Grayson's so interested.
I mean, frankly, I've admired Shaw since I was a boy.
I actually chose him for a subject for a biography in school.
Do you want to know something very, very odd? What? For all my recent digging, I've not been able to uncover one single fact that I didn't include back then.
Perhaps there is nothing more to tell, that's why.
Perhaps.
Tell me something, Szabo.
Have you ever met a man without any secrets? I've destroyed over half a dozen nosferatu in the last week alone.
And they are summoned by their sire.
Now, I I share your concerns about the American.
But he is hardly the greatest threat that we face.
Agreed.
But we must not underestimate Grayson, nor the power of his purse.
Making inroads with his man, Harker, is a start.
But nonetheless Yes, I think Grayson does bear scrutiny.
I agree with Jayne.
The Order needn't be involved.
I shall see to it personally.
Good.
Keep me informed.
(KNOCKING ON DOOR) Ah.
Our distinguished guests have arrived.
Welcome, General Shaw, General Ogilvy.
My Lady, My Lord.
Please, gentlemen, sit down.
So, General.
You assured us total control of the Persian oil fields by March.
Yes, of course.
But as you may know, the situation has become much more complex.
How so? Please explain.
- May I? - Of course.
Our provocateurs have been unable to foment so much as a border skirmish since the Sultan issued a decree to his men to stand down under pain of death.
So you see, there's little we can do save a full-scale pre-emptive invasion.
Of course, Parliament would never (GROANS) (STRUGGLING) My condolences, General Shaw.
I'm sorry? It appears General Ogilvy hanged himself.
His adjutant will discover him in the washroom of his quarters tomorrow morning.
Tragic.
So, General, when can we expect to begin the Ottoman offensive? Shall we say August? Yes, sir.
August.
LORD DAVENPORT: It is an interesting case.
One which requires your particular talents.
What are your intentions? To discover the one thing Mr Alexander Grayson loves most in all the world.
And then? Corrupt it.
Deface it.
Obliterate it from this earth.
Is the Order aware of your intentions? They are aware I am investigating Mr Grayson.
Please, answer the question.
Well, you know as well as I that if they did, I'd be forced to explain my motivation.
You mean your son's recent suicide after the death of his lover? - Please, Mrs Kleiberson - I only wish to clarify the situation, and that is thus.
You wish to employ my services in order to execute an unsanctioned operation.
As I said before, not completely unsanctioned.
I understand.
May I then rely on your complete discretion in this matter so that I may engage another contractor? That will not be necessary.
I have decided to accept the assignment.
Despite it being unsanctioned? Because it is unsanctioned, I will require double my standard fee.
Plus expenses, of course.
Of course.
Mr Harker? It seems Her Ladyship wishes to see me tonight.
No details.
How intriguing.
Sir, how long is Mr Cervenka going to be our guest? You heard me.
As long as he wishes.
Do you have any objections? Oh, yes.
Quite a growing number of objections.
Chief among which is his lack of discretion and complete absence of self-control.
(CHUCKLING) You're right.
He can be impetuous.
But Josef has saved my life on the battlefield more times than I care to count.
He's like my brother.
More than my brother.
His loyalty is absolute.
And he will obey my orders.
Nevertheless, he has demonstrated that his obedience and loyalty fall a distant second and third to his nature.
He cannot be domesticated, nor fully trusted.
Why? He knows your true feelings toward Miss Murray, for one.
And their origins.
I've sworn his silence.
A silence I'm sure he means to keep, but only insofar as he's capable of keeping it.
It's not his loyalty that worries me.
I'm glad you came.
These things are best done in person.
What things? Well, I did enjoy our soirée last night, and I do find your company on occasion most agreeable, but I'm afraid I must terminate this relationship.
How distressingly predictable.
- Excuse me? - Never mind.
I'll be on my way.
Uh, no.
Wait.
I'm curious.
Exactly what is this predictability that you find so Distressing? Well, not so much distressing as disappointing.
Really? The situation is clear.
Crystal clear in fact.
- Must I go on? - Please, do.
You are a woman who takes great pleasure in asserting her domination over men.
However, once you do, you very soon grow bored with them.
True enough.
Go on.
Since we met, you've made every effort to do the same with me.
- And in this you have utterly failed.
- (SCOFFS) This failure to dominate me has led to you being infatuated with me.
Such is the intensity of your emotions that they threaten your sense of independence and control.
The only way to reassert this control is by terminating our relationship.
Oh, you do flatter yourself so! Your vulnerability is evident by your withdrawal.
I call your actions cowardice.
And I call your ploys tedious.
You still assert that you feel nothing for me? Nothing at all.
- (KNOCKING ON DOOR) - BUTLER: Follow me, sir.
(CLEARS THROAT) This way, sir.
GRAYSON: Tonight's engagement? JAYNE: I imagine so.
And does it give you great pleasure to see me here as he arrives? The game, Mr Grayson, requires at least three players.
Someday, madam, you'll realise I was never playing.
CERVENKA: The Huntress made a fool of you.
- You know nothing.
- I followed you.
I heard every word.
Who gave you permission to follow me? I could smell her stink on you when you returned home last night.
I could never have believed you would consort with such a despicable creature.
Do you not understand? We have a very complex strategy.
Some of our tactics are distasteful.
- Disgusting! - Perhaps.
But they are necessary if we are to emerge victorious.
We are playing a very dangerous and a very unforgiving game.
By seducing their Huntress, I take her out of their game.
Ah, but not any more.
Because there she is, back on the board.
Hunting us.
Killing us! Do you not remember when we were the hunters and they were the prey? Why, you and I would harvest a hundred souls before breakfast! Please, My Liege, I beseech thee.
Let me kill her.
Make her scream.
(HORSE WHINNIES) Mr Harker? You sent me the note? Peter Lang, formerly Corporal Lang of Her Majesty's Rifle Brigade.
You have the truth I seek regarding Shaw? I do.
Cost you 10 bob to hear it.
I got an address for you.
And a name.
A lady called Vera Markham.
Who is she to him? See for yourself.
(KNOCKING ON DOOR) WOMAN: Who is it? Uh, my name's Jonathan Harker.
Yes? I'm looking for Vera Markham.
I'm Vera Markham.
(SNARLING) (GRUNTING) Argh! JAYNE: Ahem.
(SCREAMS) - (COUGHS) - (GASPS) Oh, God! Oh, my God, Alexander.
I thought you were dead, your heart - There was a man! - He's gone.
He's gone.
He's gone.
He's gone.
You scared him away.
Oh, you saved my life.
What were you doing in my bedroom in the first place? I suffer from insomnia from time to time, and it's my habit to take long night-time walks.
As of late, I've found myself increasingly drawn to this street.
Please, go on.
I walk this street again and again.
And I stop and I just look at this house.
Thinking of you.
(CHUCKLES) I sound like an idiot schoolboy.
(SOFTLY) It's all right.
That's enough.
The one we've been searching for? I believe so.
So London is free again? Excellent.
Thank you, sir.
Your methods, though.
It was reckless, foolhardy even, to lure such a creature into your home.
- There was every chance - There was no chance.
- But surely, you must see - There was no chance.
GRAYSON: You would not have recognised her! So contrite, so gentle, so shy.
I have sheared the tiger's claws.
Just as you said you would, sir.
Although some doubted me.
She'll never see me now.
The Ordo Dracul has lost its most dangerous weapon.
And it doesn't even know it.
And you were able to remove Josef in the process.
A master stroke.
(SOFTLY) Yes.
- I'm sorry, sir.
- Don't mention it.
Josef was a soldier.
He would have understood.
Sometimes you have to sacrifice a knight to capture a queen.
Goodbye, Josef.
Tomorrow we get back to work, Renfield.
We need that alloy for the resonator.
Yes, sir.
Ma'am, may I help you with that? (GRUNTS) Argh! MAN: Police business, he's a known criminal.
No cause for alarm.
Let me go! Come on, let's get out of here.