ER s15e17 Episode Script

T-Minus-6

[DOOR OPENS] [DOOR CLOSES] Well, the heat is still not working, but the stove is just fine.
Yeah, I can smell that.
I've got eggs, poached, English muffins, rashers, juice, coffee.
-You're catering to my every need.
-Every?.
All the ones I can think of.
I'll try and come up with some more.
[NEELA CHUCKLES] You know, my mom used to bring me breakfast in bed every Saturday morning when I was a kid.
We had no money really, barely scraped by but the one luxury, I could always expect.
That sounds nice.
You?.
Me what?.
What was it like when you were a kid?.
You never talk about that.
Well, I was barely living before I met you.
[BOTH CHUCKLE] What about your parents?.
Do you have brothers and sisters?.
I don't know anything about you.
Aliens dropped me from a space ship just outside Perth as a fully formed adult in 2OO7.
I'm 2 in Earth years.
But I really love this planet.
Uh.
Raised by my mother, only child.
Tell me more.
-Eat.
-Oh, come on.
[BACON CLATTERS] [NEELA SlGHS] Now, why does every conversation with you have to end in sex?.
-Oh, that sounds like a complaint.
-No.
I mean-- [BOTH CHUCKLlNG] NEELA: No.
Ha, ha.
-How do I look?.
-You look fine.
Turtleneck's not too severe?.
RUSSELL: No.
What are you--?.
You're nervous.
Yeah.
I hear the director is really tough.
I wanna be sure when she looks at me, she sees a mom.
Yes, she does, baby.
Oh, excuse me.
You'd think with all the money we're spending -we'd get sushi or something.
BANFlELD: Heh.
Yeah.
Chicago Connection Adoption Agency.
For 1O,OOO bucks, you get cold coffee, a stale bagel and a baby.
[WHlSPERlNG lNDlSTlNCTLY] Now, come on.
That was a little funny, hmm?.
Come on.
Knee and shoulder pain.
Drove into Lake Michigan.
-What?.
-I've never had a moving violation.
-lt wasn't his fault.
-Were you driving?.
No, he was, but we were only following directions.
Someone told you to drive through the lake?.
-Kathy.
-Who's Kathy?.
Our GPS system.
-Your GPS said to drive into the water?.
-Not exactly.
It just turned out that way.
Multicultural adoptions have been on the rise in the last 1 O years.
Shorter wait times and reduced fees have all played a key role.
Reduced fees?.
Why wait a year for a white baby?.
Pick up a six-pack of black kids -on the way home from work.
-You think this is funny, huh?.
The devaluing of black children?.
JEREMY: Calm down, it was a joke.
I mean, why are you guys here?.
-It's obvious that you're not serious.
MlCHELLE: What's your problem?.
ELlSE: You're feeling stress from this-- BANFlELD: You making a joke of this.
They're blowing off steam.
Need to shut up, pay attention to what's going on.
You need to get that stick up out of your ass.
Okay.
Let's get out of here.
ELlSE: --we encourage an open adoption philosophy in which birth parents and adoptive parents.
I feel bad for the kid who ends up with you.
The GPS system said go straight.
Kathy has this kind of authority.
But Kathy was telling you to drive off an embankment.
We asked for an alternate route.
She kept saying go straight.
You knowingly crashed into the lake because a computer voice told you to?.
She's got satellite data.
You don't think anything's wrong with that?.
Of course there is.
Kathy's broken.
Okay, ha, ha.
I'll be back to sew up that cut.
I'm sure they can get her back to baseline if they-- [SAM SlGHS] Okay.
All right, I'll be there.
See you then.
Thanks.
That your mom?.
Yeah, she got a little loopy on the plane.
-Altitude could drop her sats.
-That's what I thought.
They'll buff her up in the nursing home.
It'll be fine.
I'm gonna head over after my shift.
How long has it been since you've seen your mom?.
[SlGHS] I don't know.
It's, uh, a while.
[PHONE BEEPlNG] I better get that.
Frank, Keflex for the cellulitic mime in 3 and duct-tape girl needs a note for her parole officer.
Forgot how much I love it here.
You can't discharge a patient without a med-reconciliation form.
A what?.
New requirement from the commission.
We have to be sure all meds are current in our records.
I see.
GATES: And we stopped using Keflex years ago.
-You know, with all the MRSA around.
-Right.
Explosion in an apartment building on Dearborn.
-Six coming in, five minutes out.
-Gates, Sam, outside.
Somebody find Morris.
We need another attending here.
-Uh, hello?.
-Oh, thought you might lay low -sit out your first one.
-Not my first one.
I mean you've been out of the loop.
Spent five years running a refugee hospital in Darfur.
More loop than anyone should see in a lifetime.
All right.
Do what you feel comfortable with.
All right, get Brenner down here.
It's been over a week.
You said she could only live like that a month.
Well, they'll find another heart.
-I heard it can take a year sometimes.
-Yeah, but she's on the top of the list.
Can I stay here today instead of going to school?.
[BOTH CHUCKLE] -What do you think?.
-No.
Ha-ha-ha.
BRENNER: No.
No.
Ha, ha.
Now, how's your, um--?.
How's your foster family?.
Elaine's okay.
She's the mom.
Stan's, heh a little weird.
He's weird?.
He's like all flirty and silly.
Makes dumb jokes and walks around without clothes on.
-He does what?.
-He's a freak.
He acts more like a kid than an adult sometimes.
It creeps us all out.
[PAGER RlNGlNG] I've gotta go down to the ER now, Lucy.
I want you to wait here with your mom until it's time for school, okay?.
Okay.
Okay.
[SlREN WAlLlNG] Twelve-year-old, minor burns, radial deformity.
GCS is 1 5, vitals are good.
-Curtain 3, lV, morphine, x-ray.
SAM: Got it.
-Mom! SAM: We'll see her as soon as we can.
Annie Dixon, 37, complaining of abdominal pain and headache.
Tachy and hypotensive, sats 92.
Trauma One's open.
I'm Doctor Banfield.
ANNlE: My kids.
NORMAN: They're doing okay.
They're more scared than anything.
This is Norman, the good Samaritan.
-They're 3A, I'm 4B.
-Heard the explosion, got the kids out.
NORMAN: I live alone.
She likes to cook for me.
Hypoxic 8-year-old with a crush injury to the leg.
Curtain 3, find Dawn to help you.
-Breena, honey?.
NORMAN: In good hands.
Ortho to the cast room.
Picked up five beds.
This is Norman.
He needs access, fluids and pain meds.
T ake Mrs.
Dixon.
She's sicker than me.
-Yeah?.
-No, I got her.
Uh, you help Gates.
Maybe you can benefit from having an experienced resident in the room -just in case.
-Just in case what?.
Got your back, Johnny.
First you can't trust a GPS, then it's your parents.
-Then it's the government.
-It's a slippery slope.
-You're losing me.
-We're not ashamed of it.
If more people were like us, the world would be a better place.
But there'd definitely be a lot more cars at the bottom of Lake Michigan.
[MORRlS CHUCKLES] What are you, some kind of rebel, breaking the rules?.
Some defiant bad boy riding around in a leather jacket on his unlicensed, un-carbureted hog?.
-Uh, Tildie.
-That's Doctor Morris.
-ls that what you are?.
-Knees done.
I'll go check on their x-rays.
We pay our taxes, we don't jaywalk, I change our air filter every six months.
What's wrong with that?.
Nothing, but being a little free-spirited can be healthy at times.
-Might save your life.
-We're free-spirited.
You ever go skinny-dipping, hmm?.
Built a bonfire on the beach?.
Question authority of any kind?.
-Who'd you vote for?.
-We were afraid of change.
Okay, well, it's obviously time for you two to live a little.
Here.
See this?.
-Cut it off.
-What?.
-Wait.
-That's against the law.
Guys, you're missing the whole point.
Sometimes you just gotta cut the tag off.
[TlLDlE AND MORRlS SlGH] [WHlSPERS] Yeah.
Archie, I've got a kid with an open radial fracture.
-Another in danger of losing her airway.
-Be right there.
Lots of mattresses around here, guys.
Go to town.
Peter Parker gets bit by the spider and becomes Spider-Man.
-Kind of what happened to me.
CARTER: You were bit by a spider?.
No, ha, ha.
Since that ambulance blew up last year it's like I'm fearless.
I got a whole other sense.
-Sense?.
-I can feel when someone is in distress.
Like Superman always knew Lois Lane was in trouble?.
Whatever it is, it's a gift to use for good.
Tachy to 1 1 0, sats 99.
CARTER: Get some Silvadene down here.
You mean Aquacel.
That's what we use now.
It's better.
Big improvement.
You'll like it.
[MONlTOR BEEPlNG] A little fluid on Morrison's.
-You have any pain?.
-No.
And that's the strange part.
I never get hurt.
Fire, car crashes, storms.
If someone's in danger, I just go and I'm fine.
Fluid on the ultrasound could be blood.
-Need a special x-ray called a CAT scan.
-Hurry up, I wanna go see her kids.
-PO contrast, send him down.
-We don't use contrast for belly CTs.
-Oh, no?.
GATES: Mm-mm.
-Not since we got the 64-slice scanner.
-Ooh, how long have you had that?.
I don't know.
Couple years.
I'm gonna go get the Aquacel.
[ANNlE WHEEZlNG] -Whoa, must have ruptured her TM.
BANFlELD: From the blast.
Ear drum's the first thing to go.
Please.
My kids.
My kids.
-We'll get them as soon as we can.
-How's it going with the hero?.
Fluid on the FAST, we're taking him to CT.
-How's Doctor Carter doing?.
-He's cool.
A little rusty.
Only a little while.
Mom's been trying to pay the electric company.
-Sats 89, 1 OO percent nonrebreather.
MORRlS: Hooked up the gas grill for heat?.
-T old her it wasn't safe.
-Hemopneumo on the left.
-What's that?.
-Bleeding in her lung.
We have to drain it.
Chest tube, 2O-french.
I'm gonna check on Clay, okay?.
I'm calling for Stan Griswold.
I'm the doctor on Joanie Lipson, Lucy's mom.
-We were talking today-- CLAY: Breena all right?.
Wanted to make sure everything was all right with her.
Can you call me please at County as soon as you get this?.
Thank you.
JAMES: Is his arm gonna be okay?.
Gave him a nerve block.
Can't feel a thing.
You're gonna need surgery on that wrist.
For real?.
-You weren't home when this happened?.
-I was on the roof.
Got a pigeon coop.
That's a good time to have a hobby.
I'll go check on Mom and be back.
Archie, Ortho knows about this guy?.
Yeah, but bug them again.
They're slow.
Seven-oh and an intubation tray.
Gonna put a tube down to help you breathe.
ANNlE: No.
Let me see my kids.
-We'll take it out as soon as we can.
-Someone find her son.
-Strike anyone as strange that she can hardly breathe, but her sats are 1 OO?.
Grady, put her on 1 OO percent O2.
Sam, good call.
-[LAUGHlNG] I eat fire, I wrestle lions.
-Sinus tach with PVCs.
Carter, get your patient on a 1 OO percent O2.
-He has carbon monoxide-- -Carbon monoxide poisoning.
-Confabulating, hallucinations, fits.
-Send for carbon monoxide level?.
-I'm doing it right now.
-You feel better if Dr.
Morris took over?.
GATES: Lift your leg.
-What?.
Been out a long time.
I know how that is.
BANFlELD: This patient is sick.
He needs-- -I know what he needs.
All right, I want you to be comfortable.
GATES: Wiggle your toes.
-I'm comfortable.
-They wont.
CARTER: What won't?.
I can't move my legs.
[MONlTOR BEEPlNG RAPlDLY] Subluxation fracture of T-1 O.
-Oh, my God, you're pretty.
-Hey, you have to keep this on.
CARTER: Norman Chapman.
C-H-A-P-M-A-N.
He has no sensation in his feet.
NORMAN: They're gonna regenerate.
CARTER: Attending is John Carter.
Carter.
Well, I'm new, sort of.
Systolic only 92.
Spinal shock, blood loss or both.
Pack him up, get him to the OR.
-To the hyperbaric chamber.
-What?.
-Gotta get oxygen to his brain.
-Neurosurge needs to get in there.
I'd rather be paralyzed than brain damaged.
You?.
-His crit's dropping.
He'll bleed out.
DAWN: OR's ready.
Okay.
Tell them we'll be there after the decompression.
Load with Solumedrol before we take him in.
-Solumedrol is no longer-- -I know the debate.
With respect, whether a patient needs surgery needs to be left to the surgeon.
Neela, with equal due respect, I remember what it was like to be you.
-T o be me?.
CARTER: When you're a surgical intern you feel like surgeons are the only real doctors.
-That approach can be a little narrow.
-I am not an intern.
Protecting his brain is our highest priority, doctor.
You'll thank me later.
Marisol, can you get Lucien on the phone now?.
-How long's it been stuck here?.
-It's hasn't moved in five minutes.
-Frank, call Maintenance.
-Already did.
Eager to tell us they'll get to it when they get to it.
It's an old infrastructure.
Try to be patient.
[SAM SlGHS] SAM: Shoulder films on your GPS drone.
-You okay?.
-Yeah.
Just ran all the way down from Radiology on account of the elevators.
GATES: Hmm.
Mary Taggart, end-stage emphysema, decompensated on a flight.
Hey, I'm sorry.
The home wouldn't take her without getting checked out first.
MORRlS: Who's this?.
GATES: Sam's mother.
DUMAR: She's tachypnic in the 3Os and has a left hemiparesis.
-That's her baseline.
She had a stroke.
-All right, I'll take this.
Exam 2.
Ready for the Thora-Seal.
Another unit, type specific, FFP and platelets.
Let Surgery know we have a potential customer.
Okay, duly noted.
Grade-two liver lac, pulmonary contusions.
Stay ahead of the blood loss so she can avoid the OR.
Sounds like a good plan.
How is her carbon monoxide level?.
Not stable enough for hyperbaric.
Exactly.
Neither is Carter's patient.
So can you please explain to me why he won't listen to reason?.
[MONlTOR BEEPlNG RAPlDLY] GRADY: Get the rapid infuser.
Sometimes reason doesn't get you anywhere.
-Excuse me?.
-We have four kids who could be orphaned despite all reasonable efforts.
Part of the deal.
Doesn't mean we can start abandoning protocol.
Carter was in the field.
Without the technology, you only listen to your gut.
Systolic's down to 82.
Can't say I blame him.
Looks like reason's having a bad day.
[GURNEY APPROACHlNG] He's hypoventilating.
You don't want to tube him?.
No, he'll wake up in the chamber.
Why did you roll over on this?.
Something about reason having a bad day.
This robs him of any chance of walking.
-You're being dramatic.
-Ask any neurosurgeon.
-We're making a mistake.
-Neurosurgeons are biased.
And by the way, so are we.
We see every case through the haze of our own experience, our own expertise.
Sometimes a fresh set of eyes is a valuable thing.
This is crap.
-Hey.
You okay?.
-No, I'm having a horrible day.
We're blowing this case, which nobody-- -Frank, any messages for me?.
FRANK: Nothing.
[BRENNER SlGHS] -You were saying?.
-Oh, never mind.
-I'm sorry, I'm listening.
NEELA: No, it's all right.
LUCY: Hi, Neela.
NEELA: Hey.
-Hi, Simon.
BRENNER: Hey.
-Time to go.
-Okay, I'll walk her out.
Okay, I'll see you later.
-Bye.
-Bye.
When can I live with my mom again?.
That depends on a lot of stuff.
I don't like living there.
I don't feel comfortable.
-It's not gonna be for much longer.
-Okay.
ELAlNE: Hey, Lucy, how's she doing today?.
LUCY: The same.
Mrs.
Griswold, can I have a word?.
-Oh, it's Dr.
Brenner, right?.
-Yeah.
Well, I gotta get her to school drop off my little one at her grandma's and then be at work by 1 1.
I'm, uh, curious, how it's going?.
-Excuse me?.
-At home with Lucy.
Did she say something?.
She seems a little uncomfortable with Stan.
-I tried ringing, but-- -Everyone's uncomfortable with Stan.
He's my husband and I love him, but he's weird.
Okay?.
Weird is not a qualification for being a foster parent.
We got two of our own and three foster kids in our apartment.
He's great with them.
It's me he's not so great with.
Laid off in October, he still won't get off his ass and find a job.
Look, I really gotta get going.
[ENGlNE STARTS] KELLY: You know, she was fine at first.
And then she started having trouble breathing and not making sense.
SAM: I wouldn't even recognize her.
It's been a really long time.
It's hard to believe how easy it could be just to shut stuff off.
Looks like your mom has right-middle lobe pneumonia.
IV antibiotics?.
Y eah, but her sats aren't too bad though.
-What's that mean?.
-We could probably buff her up.
She'll be back in the home in a few hours.
That's good.
She's gonna be more comfortable there.
[KELLY SlGHS] KELLY: Gotta change my flight.
Can I use the phone at the desk?.
Use the Break Room.
You remember where that is.
Yes.
[MARY COUGHlNG] Looks like the O2 is working.
Yeah, she'll be coming around.
-I don't even know what to say to her.
-I'm sure you'll figure it out.
Yeah I just hope it's not something like, um: ""Why did you have to be such a crappy mom?.
"" Or ""Why couldn't you just stay in Dallas and die?.
"" Oh, I'm guessing you'll come up with something better.
[DOOR OPENS] Where is my--?.
What's going on?.
What's going on?.
Hi, Mom.
It's me, Sammy.
-You're in Chicago.
-Where?.
At the hospital where I work.
You're a nurse.
Yeah.
Sammy.
Sammy.
Sammy.
Sammy.
Sammy?.
I'm sorry that it's been so long.
Do l--?.
Do I know you?.
Have we met before?.
[COUGHlNG] [MARY PANTlNG] [MARY GROANS] -Thanks for waiting.
-We can do this inside.
Eh, I need my nicotine fix anyway.
The baby's sleeping.
I gotta take the trash out.
BRENNER: I left a message for you on your answering machine.
I don't know how to work that thing.
My wife's the one who checks it.
Right, well, I was just, uh, wondering how it's all going with Lucy.
She's a good kid.
Been through a lot.
Well, she, um.
She says she feels uncomfortable here.
That's natural, right?.
I mean, new place, new people, and she is a little bit of an odd duck.
They're my favorites.
Not the most adaptable, but in the end-- She says you make her feel, uh, uncomfortable.
What's that supposed to mean?.
Look, I got a really narrow tolerance for the way people treat kids.
That's a personal foible of mine.
What the hell's a foible?.
Are you crossing the line with her?.
You come here for this?.
My wife and I love these kids.
All of them.
-You're gonna accuse me of some cra--?.
BRENNER: Shut up! Shut up.
Just stop talking.
I don't know what's wrong with you if you're nuts or just got the wrong idea somehow.
[BRENNER PANTlNG] -You walk around naked.
-What?.
Or is she lying?.
Is she lying?.
She came home early one day, I got out of the shower in my towel.
I'm not some pervert, man.
I'm not some freak.
What, you think I get off on kids?.
Is that what you think?.
I'm sorry.
-Look, we don't have a lot of dough.
BRENNER: I'm sorry.
And maybe I look like a loser to you.
But I don't need some rich doctor coming here accusing me of terrible things that I would never, never do.
-They spiked your soda?.
-lt was like a diuretic or something.
And nailed up a stuffed animal by your desk?.
It's hazing.
It'll stop eventually.
Think this has to do with what happened?.
Same difference.
Either way, I'm gonna ride it out.
-lf this goes on too long-- -I gotta stop it.
-This time I'll deal with it.
-Okay.
-I can take care of myself, Archie, really.
-I know.
I gotta admit, I do like that you worry about me.
Here's my partner to pick me up.
Archie, this is my new partner, Ed Bernstein.
-Archie Morris.
-Nice to meet you.
-You're looking out for her.
-She looks out for herself.
I'll be right back.
I left my phone inside.
You're the doctor friend, huh?.
The outfit gives me away every time, ha.
[AMBULANCE HORN HONKlNG] [SlREN WAlLlNG] -How long you been on the job?.
-Been in HGS almost 1 5 years.
You can show her the ropes.
You know, back her up.
Cops take care of each other, doc.
You know that.
-Let's get out of here.
BERNSTElN: Sure thing.
CLAUDlA: See you later, Archie.
-Bye.
Thanks for the coffee.
[ENGlNE STARTS] BURT: Oh, no, no.
It's still blinking.
-Come on, Burt.
Live a little.
[BURT SlGHS] -Come on, come on, come on.
-Guys.
-Guys! -Burt, watch out! [SCREAMS THEN CRASH] [BURT GROANS] Brenner called, said he's not feeling well, gave his pass-ons to Gates.
I just love how this place runs itself.
[BURT WAlLlNG] TlLDlE: It's okay, Burt.
-I got hit by a moped, Tildie.
-But it was exciting.
Risky.
Daring.
-I'll take them to 3, call Ortho.
-Please do.
TlLDlE: He'll be all right, won't he?.
Yes, but you two really have to get control of yourselves.
You're the one who said to tear the mattress tag.
Tear the what?.
No, it was a metaphor for living fully, taking chances.
A metaphor?.
Why didn't you tell me she was so altered?.
Well, she's not always like this, you know.
When she's home and everything's okay, she's pretty clear but the plane really tipped her over.
All right, she can stay here tonight and we'll move her tomorrow.
You can stay with me if you want.
Uh, actually, I can't.
But I'll check in with you when I get to Tokyo.
What?.
You're going?.
Sammy, I have to, l-- You said you were gonna stay until we got her settled into the nursing home.
I can't, Sammy.
[SlGHS] Look, this is-- This is hard and l-- [SCOFFS] I know it's probably more than she deserves.
Thank you.
[DEFlBRlLLATOR WHlRRlNG] -FFP's in.
-Order more from the blood bank.
-Three-sixty.
BANFlELD: Clear.
-I heard you could use a little help.
-No, we're good.
-You sure?.
BANFlELD: Clear.
[EKG BEEPlNG] DAWN: Still in V-tach.
-Resuming compressions.
Another, type specific.
Liver lac opened.
-She needs the OR.
-Well, good idea.
But she goes into v-tach every time we try to move her.
BANFlELD: James, understand what's going on?.
Is she gonna die?.
BANFlELD: What are you doing?.
-Find the source of the bleeding.
-She's got a shot.
-Gonna do an ex-lap right here?.
No, he's not.
Surgeons come once a week.
Rest of the time, on our own.
-Ten blade.
JAMES: I don't understand.
-You're gonna cut her open?.
-Gonna pack off the liver try and control this bleeding and buy us a bit of time.
Tell me about your mom.
Tell me something she likes.
-The beach.
She likes swimming.
-Hold her hand.
And pretend that's where you are.
-Thirteen units up.
-Lucky 1 3.
Switch out, get sterile.
Gonna need an assistant.
You heard him.
Come on.
GATES: You think we should tell Surgery we're doing this, at least?.
No.
Hey, how is Mrs.
D and the kids doing?.
I'll try and get an update for you.
Hang in there, Norman.
-When you're an attending, you'll get it.
-Get what?.
How the subtle administrative political nuances become a big part of your job.
I don't get how you let that trump the care of a patient.
The right course of action was frankly a little unclear.
He has a spinal fracture and paralysis.
Seems clear he needs the OR.
-We'll see.
-You never take my opinion seriously.
-Not true.
-You don't view me as an equal.
I have 1 5 years of experience on you, so no, I don't.
-Then how's that ever gonna change?.
-Neela.
You might wanna call Neurosurge.
He's moving his toes.
-What you did in there-- -Had a really good chance of working.
It did, so spare me.
It was smart and gutsy.
Thought she was gonna make it.
-Almost doesn't really count, does it?.
SAM: Guy in the hyperbaric chamber -is moving his legs.
-Really?.
Mm-hm.
Neurosurgery is up there now.
Would you tell her I'm upstairs, if she's looking for me?.
Thank you.
You know, this has been one incredibly weird day.
[SAM SCOFFS] I read in the paper that Mars is transitioning from Capricorn to Aquarius.
-That must be it.
-Yeah.
Blast injuries can force air from the lungs into blood.
An embolus is likely lodged in his spinal cord, causing transient paralysis.
-Chamber shrank the embolus?.
-lt forced it into solution.
-lt was carried to the lungs.
-You think the spinal fracture is stable -no cord injury?.
-T oo soon to know.
We need to look.
Call me when you get to the unit.
-Okay.
-Y es.
Y es, yes.
Am I done?.
-Do you wanna come out of there?.
NORMAN: Yes.
Please.
Man, this is like the pod from the Planet of the Apes.
The original one.
You're a very lucky man, Mr.
Chapman.
That's what I've been trying to tell you, ha, ha.
I am indestructible.
Hey, how is Mrs.
D and the kids doing?.
The kids are stable.
They've all been admitted.
But Mrs.
Dixon had very serious injuries to her liver and spleen.
-And she died.
NORMAN: What?.
We did everything that we possibly could.
-We couldn't control the bleeding.
-No, no.
I don't believe it.
Mrs.
D can't be dead.
That doesn't make any sense.
You saved those children.
Don't forget that.
We have to take you to the OR now, make sure you're not bleeding internally.
Oh, my God.
This last year was like I've been under a magic spell or something.
I guess I got kind of hooked on it.
-But I guess it's pretty much over now.
-What's over?.
The era where everything works out.
Make sure to tap the pseudo-tumor girl.
Brenner was supposed to and never got to it.
-What happened to him anyway?.
-Went home sick.
-Seemed fine this morning.
-Hello, everybody.
You here already?.
I don't get off till 7.
I know, but my hand's feeling a little worse for wear.
-I thought someone could take a look.
-Let me see.
Please, ignore my advice.
You were doing fine without me.
Just don't rely too much on the GPS system, okay?.
BURT: Okay.
-No more running with scissors?.
MORRlS: I think not.
-No more sex in the--?.
Definitely not.
TlLDlE: Oh.
Well, it was fun while it lasted.
Wow, I feel like I just drowned their puppy.
That's what you get for telling them to tear the tags off.
Grady, set my husband up in Curtain 2.
-We might have to do a hand series.
GRADY: Sure thing.
Here.
After you're done, get the other stuff.
I'm leaving soon.
-Right this way, Mr.
Banfield.
-Russell's fine, I'm not an old man.
-So, uh, how's it going with the cop?.
-Good.
Very good.
In fact, I kind of want things to move forward, but I'm not sure how.
You know what I just did for the old lady as a romantic gesture?.
Adjoining burial sites.
She cried and cried.
I'll keep that in mind, Frank.
How does, uh, Claudia feel about things?.
I'm not sure.
I can't tell.
That's what's making me nervous.
You know, I don't like to get into all this personal stuff you people drag around here.
But I'm gonna offer you a bit of wisdom I heard on the street.
Sometimes you just gotta cut the mattress tag.
Mattress tag?.
I'm telling you, Dan and Rose's Shared Plots and Cremation Urns.
I got the number in my phone.
Well, I suppose I could tell you that I cut myself with a scalpel or that I slipped in the snow or make up some other stupid excuse but why bother?.
-A shunt.
-Y eah.
It's for dialysis.
I had it revised yesterday, but it seems to be oozing a bit.
I'd call that more than a bit.
Why are you on dialysis?.
Oh.
Bad luck, really.
Some years ago, I lost function in my left kidney after an incident here.
I, uh.
I got stabbed by a patient and a med student was killed.
And then when I was in Africa, I developed amyloidosis secondary to schistosomiasis, which took care of the other one.
Wow.
That is bad luck.
For a while, I kind of had this idea that it would all magically disappear but a week in a Nairobi hospital cured me of that.
So I need a kidney.
And I came back to the States to get on the list.
[BANFlELD SlGHS] I'll, uh, keep my fingers crossed.
Actually, as it turns out, you and I have the same blood type and minor antigens group.
Really?.
In fact, the truth is that I wanted to work here so that I could to meet you and try to convince you to donate one of your kidneys to me.
What do you say?.
I' m just kidding.
I have no idea what your blood type you are.
[CHUCKLlNG] -Oh, so serious, Cate.
-Hmm.
You gonna wanna do a resection or a primary repair?.
I don't know.
Depends on what we find when we get in there.
Right.
Neela, you know the main reason that you and I fight is that you're one of the only people around here that I actually find worthy of arguing with.
I don't like these new brushes.
Which is another way of saying that I respect you and look forward to working together as colleagues.
The committee's announcing appointments at the end of the week.
I think you're gonna be very happy.
Lucien, I've, um, withdrawn my application.
I'm not staying at County.
BANFlELD: Hey.
-Hey.
This morning at the agency, I was acting crazy.
-You and me both.
-No.
-You were just defending my honor.
-Still.
Heh.
When was the last time I hit a guy?.
[BOTH CHUCKLE] Do you think our erratic behavior was some sort of sign?.
Sign of what?.
That maybe adoption isn't the right thing for us.
-I don't know.
-Hmm.
Me either.
[BANFlELD SlGHS] Being there, thinking about being a father again what that would mean, it was harder than I thought.
[BANFlELD CHUCKLES] Still, it doesn't mean that we shouldn't do it.
It doesn't?.
Let's just sit with it a while.
See how we feel down the line.
[BANFlELD SlGHS] BANFlELD: Hmm.
Can I get you anything?.
Oh.
We're still waiting on your x-ray.
Soup.
I need soup.
[BOTH LAUGHlNG] [KNOCKlNG ON DOOR] BRENNER: Neela.
NEELA: Simon.
-Oh.
Baby, I've missed you.
NEELA: Are you drunk?.
-Yeah.
Well, no, just a little.
Where have you been?.
I've been calling.
Yeah, well, I had the ringer on my phone turned down, so-- Well, I bet my day was worse than yours.
Wanna play the who's-more-miserable game?.
Oh, that sounds fun.
NEELA: I went out on a limb against the ER, all by myself and Dubenko wouldn't back me up.
I mean, I knew I was right, I absolutely knew it.
But you know what?.
Turns out I wasn't.
Neela, just let it go.
-That's it?.
-Yeah.
You were wrong.
There's no point in getting upset about it.
-Well, how can you say that?.
-Okay, how about--?.
How about you take your aggression out on me?.
NEELA: What--?.
Simon.
Please.
Why do you do this every time-- [CRASH] --I try to talk about something that matters?.
Okay.
You shoot away.
What do you wanna talk about?.
I don't know.
I don't know, stuff.
You.
The things you think about, the things you want.
Talk about the real stuff.
The hard stuff.
That's what being together is.
I had a bad day too, Neela.
I did something stupid.
I did something really stupid, really messed up but I don't have a neurotic urge to come here and burden you-- Bore you with some ridiculous little tale of woe! [PHONE RlNGlNG] -Do you need to get that?.
-I don't know.
I mean no.
You go ahead.
[DOOR CLOSES] Ray.
Yeah, hi.
CARTER: Hey.
-Hey.
CARTER: Sorry I left the, uh, frostbite guy in Curtain 3.
There's a homeless shelter that's supposed to come by and talk to him.
It's okay.
-When's your shift over?.
-Uh, T-minus-six.
CARTER: Hours or minutes?.
-Minutes.
But I'm gonna stay until my mom gets a bed.
It's hard seeing your parents age.
Mm.
Seems like yesterday she was a tough broad.
And now she's a terrified old lady.
How do you get from there to here?.
That's the million-dollar question.
It's nice to have you back.
[SlGHS] Brought you something to eat.
Why won't they let me go?.
I don't know anything.
We gotta get you healthy first.
They're lying to you.
I don't belong here.
You're confused.
Things'll be clearer soon.
You just gotta eat something.
I don't know that I can trust you.
Can l?.
Can I trust you?.
Are you scared?.
I understand.
[COUGHlNG] You know, when I was really little, I used to have trouble sleeping.
My mom used to sing to me to calm me down.
[HUMMlNG ""HUSH LlTTLE BABY""] [SlNGlNG ""HUSH, LlTTLE BABY""] It's okay.
[SlNGlNG ""HUSH, LlTTLE BABY""] [MARY SlNGlNG ""HUSH, LlTTLE BABY""] I wish I had a daughter like you.
WARREN: See you next time, Dr.
Carter.
-See you then.
MARQUEZ: Good job today, like you never left.
Yeah, almost.
[AMBULANCE HORN HONKS]