NYPD Blue s03e19 Episode Script

Auntie Maimed

- Previously on NYPD Blue.
- People, places the things they do, the times they do 'em.
- Say that.
- People, places, the things they do, the times they do 'em.
A beat cop knows those four things, he's ready to do his job.
- I gotta say this, Adrianne.
- Go ahead.
- You're driving me a little nuts.
- I knew this was coming.
You made something out of absolutely nothing between me and that girl.
- This baby is moving.
- Like right now? Do you wanna feel it? Give me your hand.
Wow.
Peep.
Sipowicz.
Yeah.
Um, hold on a second.
Mm-hmm.
Ooh.
What? Uh, yeah, I know.
Mm-hmm.
All right.
I'm on my way.
Sylvia, are you having contractions? - I think it's the same as last week.
- That repositioning thing? - Or is it different? - Well, it feels the same right now, Andy.
Should we get another beeper number that my office doesn't have? That way, only you have it, and if you wanna beep me, I'll know it's you and we use that exclusively for labor, and you don't have to put in 911.
" - No.
- 'Cause you'd have to learn another number, right? - That's what makes it a bad idea.
- Yeah.
- What did the squad want? - Homicide.
I really oughta go.
'Kay.
- 911.
That's a go code.
- Got it.
It's the baby readjusting.
The lower pelvic area's makin' room.
- So it's not the real deal.
- No.
At the present moment, she don't think so.
Hey.
D.
O.
A.
's Etta Stubbs.
Neighbor across the hall called it in.
His name's Mario Walker.
Found a bloody hammer over there on the floor.
No signs of the hammer blows on the bag.
Nah.
This had to be put over her head after she was killed.
Found a busted bottle of beer on the kitchen floor.
Bedroom's torn up good.
There's a blood smear on the drawer where we found the checkbook.
- Get the neighbor? - Yeah.
He's right there.
Hey, a couple of different tenants say she had a nephew who was a bad kid.
- Nephew's name is Billy.
- I'm gonna talk to this guy.
Yeah.
- Bobby, this is Mr.
Walker.
Detective Simone.
- Hi.
- You found Miss Stubbs this morning? - I live just across the hall.
Come back from buying my paper.
Etta's door's wide open.
I go in.
She's dead on the couch.
You oughta be lookin' for her nephew about this.
- This would be Billy? - Ajunkie and a thief.
She let him do oddjobs for her.
She even got me to use him once.
- He stole my damn radio.
- You know where Billy lives? I don't know ifhe has a place.
I saw him on Fourth and'D" with the rest of thejunkies and crackheads.
That's him.
She didn't have any children of her own.
- Thanks for your cooperation.
- If you can think of anything else, we'd appreciate a call.
Looks like he cleaned out the bedroom drawers and ripped off some checks.
- There's three missing since the last entry in her checkbook.
- Hmm.
Nuts.
- What? - 911.
I gotta pick up my girls at dance class.
- You get 911 for a dancing class message? - Yeah.
Marie can't make it.
- That's the wrong use of911.
" - Andy, it's a private communication via beeper.
Are you with me, Medavoy, huh? She's misusing that code.
Sylvia's gettin' contractions.
Oh, boy.
- What'd you get? - D.
O.
A.
's a 65-year-old black woman, Etta Stubbs.
She was beat to death with a hammer.
Perp stole some blank personal checks and jewelry.
The D.
O.
A.
Has a junkie nephew that all the neighbors like for the homicide.
- Get a line on the nephew? - No address on him.
He cops over on Fourth and Avenue D.
" - We got his picture.
- I'm notifying her bank, checking accounts, cards.
- Then we'll grab this kid.
- I'm gonna run him through B.
C.
I.
- Where's Donna? - Maybe she's in thejohn? She fall in? - Hey, Donna.
- Hi.
- Employee's orientation kit.
- You got a job with Apple? My computer course included free enrollment at a city college job fair last month.
When I attended more or less on a lark, I gave my transcript and resume to their recruiter.
They just offered me an area associates position which is a fancy name for exactly what I do here but supposably," there's no promotion ceiling.
- That's great, Donna.
- I don't think I'm gonna do it.
- The position's in Silicon Valley, California.
- They don't have jobs here? Well, I applied for out there.
I mean, the whole thing was more or less a lark.
- Uh-huh.
- At the end of the day, it's not realistic.
Me in Silicon Valley.
They probably couldn't even understand my accent.
- It's nice to know you're wanted.
- I got caught up in the whole lark aspect seeing if they'd want me.
- Good morning.
- Good morning.
- Any calls? - Should I look out for one? Sylvia's having contractions.
She don't feel they're significant.
- Have you discussed getting a beeper? - We got one.
I just thought maybe she might've called off previous habit.
- Uh-uh.
- All right.
Thanks.
Two collars for possession.
Two collars for petty larceny.
The nephew.
Let's pick him up.
Have we discussed gettin' a beeper? - Hey, James.
- Hey, Bob.
- Hey.
- Hey.
- So did you talk to her last night? - I stayed at my folks'.
That robbery- I was still concerned.
- Oh, yeah.
That one last week.
- Yeah.
- Maybe I'll talk to her tonight.
- Well, if your decision's firm, it's probably a good idea 'cause, you know, I think Adrianne senses the drift of things.
I'm looking for the time that causes her the least upset.
Yeah, 'cause postponing the inevitable just makes matters fester worse.
Robbery/homicide.
You guys are catchin'.
Adrianne, Diane, you wanna work this with Greg and James? Yeah.
Sure.
- Hey.
- D.
O.
A.
's a bouncer, Carl Maclntyre.
Bartender called in.
He got stomped up too.
- Where's the bartender at? - They took him to Bellevue.
- What a brawl.
- I meant to ask how your parents are.
They're okay.
Still somewhat concerned off their neighbor getting robbed.
- Well, they're lucky they have you.
- My place.
Let me in.
- Let me in.
- Let him through.
I'm Detective Medavoy.
- You own the place? - Frank Delva.
Yeah.
- Geez.
They get the safe? - We don't know yet.
- I'd like to ask you a few questions.
- Be careful what you touch here.
- Yeah, yeah.
- Mr.
Delva, you know who might have done this? Anyone in the place.
The clientele is human dump.
The bouncer have any specific enemies you know about? Paul? No.
I don't know.
- The bartender got beat on too.
- I don't know who his enemies were.
- Thank you, God.
- You keep a lot of dough in there.
- Yeah.
I cash paychecks.
- Anyone who might've had it in for you, Mr.
Delva? My two ex-wives, but they don't know what city I'm in.
- Anyone working protection, shaking you down? No.
I got no problem with those guys.
- So you got no help for us? - I gotta call my insurance company.
Excuse me.
First impressions, I wouldn't mind whacking that guy.
Green hat.
Is that our guy? Yeah.
- He's looking to steal from that car.
- Yeah.
Got no warrants out.
Let him try to boost something so we can pop him.
- Sir, this your car? - Yeah.
- Can I see your registration? - See your keys.
- Come on, man.
Let mejust put the camera back.
- You put back the camera, then you're right with the world? - I got the cars confused.
All right.
You're under arrest.
Come here.
Turn around.
What do you got here? Women's jewelry? You wear this stuff? - I'm holding it for somebody.
- Sure.
I'll buy that.
- Give me your hand.
- Your name Billy Stubbs? - How do you know that? - All right.
Come on.
Let's go.
- Is that the junkie nephew? - Had the D.
O.
A.
's jewelry in his pocket.
- What's he saying? - He was holding it for somebody.
My beeper.
Sylvia, but no 911.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Hello.
Uh, fine.
You want me to meet you there? You should've used the 911.
Well, I can meet you over there anyway.
All right.
Whatever you say.
You'll let me know, then, right? You'll beep me? All right.
Okay.
I'm thinkin' about you.
Mm-hmm.
Bye.
The doctor, he doesn't think it's labor, but he wants her to come to his office.
- She don't want me to go with her.
- Well, ifhe thought it was time he'd have her go right to the hospital.
He's supposed to be excellent, this guy.
Sylvia's got confidence in him.
- Yeah.
That's important.
- Young Jewish guy.
He's delivered hundreds of infants.
Mm-hmm.
- I'll go talk to this kid.
- Yeah.
- You know what this is about, Billy? - That camera, man.
- Where's this blood from? - I guess I cut myself.
And you were holding this stuff in this envelope for your friend? Yeah.
That's your Aunt Etta's jewelry in that envelope there, Billy.
When was the last time you seen your Aunt Etta? - Couple days.
- Couple of days? You gonna sit there and lie to me? What are you gonna say when I tell you that we have several eyewitnesses that put you at your aunt's building this morning? - Were you at that building this morning? - All right.
- All right, what? - I was there.
I rang the bell, but nobody answered.
I guess that's when they saw me.
Are you gonna change your story when I say that they saw you inside the building? Where'd you get the jewelry? This guy asked me to hold it for him.
It was in that envelope.
I didn't look inside till afterwards.
He'd been in my aunt's house once with me.
So this guy who's been to your aunt's place once he must've broken into your Aunt Etta's and took all her jewelry and then asked you to hold it.
What's this guy's name? Larry something.
Larry.
Where we gonna find Larry something? He said he was leavin' town.
That's why he wanted me to hold that.
- This is like the worst story I ever heard.
- It's what happened.
Billy, this stuff is so bogus, you can't even get behind it.
You know what I think happened? I think you did something to your aunt that makes you sick.
We could bring this to the D.
A.
Right now as a vicious, cold-blooded homicide.
I don't think that was your intention, 'cause I can see you jonesing so I know you needed to score.
But you didn't sell your aunt's jewelry.
We collar you stealin' a camera, with her jewelry still in your pocket.
That tells me that you loved her.
You saying to yourself, 'Aw, man.
Let mejust try boostin'this camera not sell my aunt's stuff unless I can't get over on the street.
" Is that what you were thinking, Billy? Leave me alone, man.
Billy, I've been on this job long enough to know where people are at.
You don't get right with this, behind jonesing and getting sicker and sicker and then all that remorse is gonna start coming on you you are definitely gonna be a candidate for some guard at Rikers finding you hanging in your cell.
Just-Just leave me alone for a little while, man.
And then what? And then I'll talk to you.
I don't wanna hear nothin' about not seein' her for two days, Billy.
- No, man.
- So we understand each other, right? Just give me a minute, man.
How'd I do? Hey, Russell and Lesniak checked in.
They're still with the Crime Scene unit.
Oh, yeah.
We talked to this bartender over at Bellevue.
He says he's taking a leak, he hears a bunch of shoutin', comes out of the bathroom and sees this bouncer gettin' his face beat in by a bald guy big as an elephant.
Yeah.
Another guy's backing the bald guy's play, which the bartender recognizes.
- A biker named Pig.
- And he didn't recognize the bald guy? No, no.
But he says this Pig rolls with the Lobos, this biker club over on Third.
- So you wanna pick him up? - Oh, yeah.
We can't wait.
I'll get you some backup.
- Hey, guys.
- Hey, Lieu.
- Where are you with your interview? - Okay.
- Guy's thinkin' about it.
- 'Cause Greg and James have to pick up a biker.
Do we know if he's on steroids? - Hi, Son.
- Hey, Andy.
- Lieutenant, I'm sorry to interrupt.
- Want us to help? - Yeah.
Please.
- No problem on lunch.
You wanna try again tomorrow? - Yeah.
Walk out with me here.
- Okay.
I don't want my boss to hear this, but maybe you can give us a hand with this.
Sure.
- What's in the bag? - My cop's uniform.
Yeah, huh? Watch out for that.
Just stay behind me and keep your ears open.
Description's a guy about 6'4", mustache and beard.
That narrows it down.
He answers to Pig? - That's his name.
I don't know ifhe answers.
- Hey, where you goin'? - What do you care? - Get over here.
- They call you Pig? - His name is Ernie.
- Let's take a ride, Ernie.
We gotta talk to you.
- I ain't goin' nowhere.
We do this right here in the street, and you're gonna wind up hurt, okay? - Put down that wrench.
- Is he under arrest? - What's that to you, asshole? - I got nothin' to say to you.
- We are not gonna do it like this.
We're gonna talk about it in the station house.
You do it right, nobody gets hurt here.
- Not if you don't want to, Pig.
- Dick face, Pig don't come in, we toss your clubhouse.
- Wanna toss it, Andy? - We gonna find any reefer in there, any swag? - What's it gonna be, Ernie? - Jerry-Jerry, it's cool, okay? Okay.
Let's go.
What was your probable cause? You would've lost your search in court.
Yeah.
We'd have lost it in court, but meanwhile your buddies would've lost their goods and their smoke.
Stick with tricycles, F.
Lee.
You got no future in bikes.
Charlie Manson, goofy-lookin' Now you'll interrogate this guy? - Martinez and Medavoy, they caught the case.
- Pig, we're here.
- You wanna watch an interrogation? - I'd get in the way.
No, no.
Bobby and me, we're talking to this kid on another case.
- Yeah, there's an observation room, Andy.
- Yeah.
Okay.
We like this kid for killin' his aunt.
We were in with him once.
He'll probably go this time.
Come on inside.
You're startin'to come down, huh? - Want some aspirin? - I'm all right.
So we ready to take some responsibility here, Billy? I was supposed to do some wall work for her yesterday, but I didn't get there so I stayed up all night so I could make it this morning.
- Just to get to your Aunt Etta's place? - Yeah.
- I got there about 830.
- What happened? Was your aunt mad because you messed up yesterday? I walked in, and she was dead.
I just turned around and ran.
This is how you take responsibility? Who you think you're talkin' to? You had her jewelry in your pocket.
You think you can piss in my ear and tell me it's rainin'? - You got blood on your sleeve.
- You start talkin' like a man in here or I'm gonna start kickin' ass.
She loved me, and I robbed her.
- I put a bag over her head so she couldn't see me stealin'.
- All right.
- So what led up to that? - I don't know.
Somebody killed her.
You see, this is like you killin'her again you sittin' here Iyin' to me.
I am not gonna let you kill her again, Billy! You don't get to kill her twice.
- What difference does it make? - Meaning what? Meaning, whatever you say, it don't matter - Meaning what? - I'll say whatever you want me to say.
- Just tell me what you want me to write.
- We want the truth, Billy.
Did you kill your aunt? Did you take a hammer to her? - Whatever you say.
- Not whatever I say! Whatever you say.
All right, all right! I killed her! All right? I killed her! L - Oh, God.
- You ready to give a statement? - I just did.
- I'm talkin'about a written statement.
Are you ready to give a statement? We'll get a D.
A.
Yeah.
We can get you some kind of treatment.
Maybe the D.
A.
Could help you with that.
Come on.
Sarah Bernhardt.
Goes for putting a bag over her head but won't admit to killing her? He went there.
He's gonna go for it.
- Here comes your lieutenant.
- You're okay.
Latent got a blood print on the D.
O.
A.
's doorknob.
They're checking it against your guy's.
And a uniform's bringing a Leon Broadus in, who tried to cash one of the D.
O.
A.
's checks.
Bank manager couldn't tell if it was forged.
- This kid, he's ready to write, talk to a D.
A.
- So that's good.
He admits to robbing her things.
He's only gonna go for the homicide 'cause he's sick and the world's such a sad place, but that he really didn't do it.
She was dead when he got to her place.
Somebody already took a hammer to her.
Which we think is crap? - Yeah.
Probably.
- Probably.
Okay, talk to this guy that tried to cash the check before you bring in a D.
A.
I can't authorize overtime for you, AndyJr.
- I'd like to hear on those prints too.
- Yeah.
I'll call Sylvia.
The three of us'll go to lunch.
You said she went to the doctor? Yeah, he wanted to examine her.
She's feeling some repositioning going on.
We got a beeper system worked out here.
You're not sure that guy in there did it, that Billy? He probably did it.
He was just feelin' sorry for himself.
Now she'll call back.
See, you don't wanna go to bat, though, Andy, without following out what you got.
You turn a case over and something new turns up, you may not look at it right.
If you move the guy and bought his story, now you may get dug in not want to reopen the case, you know.
Yeah.
I see.
I see.
Sylvia? Yeah.
No.
Uh, you want me to come home, bring you some soup? All right.
Uh, AndyJr.
's here so me and Bobby'll take him out to lunch then.
Yeah.
Me too.
Bye.
Doc said it wasn't labor? A few centimeters' dilation, but no effacement.
Guy must charge by the word.
- I appreciate this.
- Hey, Andy, we like it too.
- Several messages, Detective.
- What's goin' on? Fingerprint technician Mulcahey from B.
C.
I.
Left word your suspect's fingerprints and the blood print lifted by the Crime Scene unit from the doorknob at your D.
O.
A.
's residence are not a match.
- Wow.
- Also, there was a minor traffic accident involving the sector cop bringing in Leon Broadus.
- That's the guy that might've forged a check from our D.
O.
A.
- They'd have him here in 10.
- Nothing from my wife? - I'd have given you that first.
Thanks, Donna.
This Broadus is clean with B.
C.
I.
We gotta get him to give up his fingerprints.
- Is that gonna make him get a lawyer? - You find a way to make him think he's gettin' over on ya.
Make him think instead ofhelpin'you, he's helpin'himself.
Reluctant as you may be to engage in deception.
- Hi, James.
- Hey.
- I was hoping we could find time later on to talk.
- Not right now.
- Me and Greg gotta interview this guy we picked up.
- That guy Pig? Yeah.
See if he'll flip on his running buddy.
Greg's already in there with him.
Well, I don't mean to put you on the spot, James.
- I was just hoping later on, we'd find time.
- Absolutely.
Definitely.
You know, um, I gotta go talk to this Pig.
Could I, uh, impose on you to ask a question? - Oh, hi, Donna.
- Um, this could sound kind of silly but have you ever resided out of state? Yeah.
I lived two years in Boston when my father's mother was sick.
- How old were you? - Four when we moved there, so I really don't remember it well.
I see.
I've, um thought very informally about relocating but I've pretty much decided it's not realistic given who I am.
I'm sure you'll make the right choice.
So how are things with you? Okay.
- I guess it never runs smooth, huh? - I guess not.
See, that time frame we're interested in, Ernie here states he was home watching TV.
Yeah? Something educational, Ernie? Yeah, I suggested possibly Ernie's confused since the eyewitness we got puts him at this titty bar at that juncture watchin' a bouncer get beat to death.
- You don't know that, man.
- Hey, Pig, the bouncer died, but the bartender made it.
He looks like a smashed tomato, but he pulled through.
We had a chat with him at Bellevue.
- He says he saw you, Pig.
- I wasn't there.
I was watchin' TV.
Pig, a homicide during a felony means the D.
A.
Don't need premeditation.
They're gonna look to inject you.
All's I did was walk into a bar.
I was supposed to watch a guy's back.
- While he did what? - This guy was in Attica till last week.
- The bouncer's banging his old lady.
- Put a name to this guy.
Jay Dolinky.
But robbery had nothin' to do with it.
There was no extra felony, okay? Nah.
Jay just wanted to beat the guy to death.
All's he said is he's gonna kick this guy's ass, for me to watch his back.
Then he goes berserk, and he kills the one guy.
Then he went off on the bartender too.
- Where we gonna find Jay, Pig? - I don't know.
- What about the ex-girlfriend? - I don't know that either.
She dances at the bar.
- He was lookin' for her address there.
- Did he find it? He could've.
He was still workin' out on those two guys when I split.
We'll get the address from that jerk that runs the place.
Come on.
- Sit still, Pig.
- Hey, could I get out of this? Well, we grabJay up, you tell what he did in court, and we'll see if we can keep you amongst the rest of the decent citizens.
- You're, uh, Leon Broadus? - Yeah.
I'm Detective Simone.
She give me that check for some carpentry.
- We talkin' about Etta Stubbs? - Yeah, yeah.
You been drinkin', Leon? - So what? - Nothin'.
I'm jealous.
So you did some work for Miss Stubbs? Yeah, I did some wall work, and I fixed her closet door.
- When was it that you did this work for her? - I finished up yesterday.
She said to wait to cash it.
That's why the date was today.
- So you're saying you picked up the check today? - I picked it up yesterday.
She dated it for today.
You know Miss Stubbs was murdered.
- I wasn't over there.
- You were over there yesterday.
- Yeah, but not today.
- Where were you this morning, Leon? - The St.
Nick.
- Over on Fourth Street? - Yeah.
- What time you get there? Maybe 8:00.
I sweep up over there.
I bring in the cans.
- Bartender, he open up with you? - He gets in at 9:00.
So how was it that you came to work for Miss Stubbs? I work for colored, white.
It makes no difference to me.
- Okay.
- I put my number up on that mailbox all on that street.
She told me that her nephew was supposed to come help her but he kept not showing up.
You and her have an argument, maybe something about her postdating that check? She told me to wait to cash it till today.
You do any work in Miss Stubbs's bedroom, Leon? - Her bedroom? - Yeah.
The bedroom.
- No.
- What about that bathroom off the bedroom? - You ever do any work in there? - I was never in the bedroom.
'Cause we got some prints off the medicine cabinet in the bathroom.
Must've been from the guy that killed her.
You know, maybe- maybe that was her nephew.
- What makes you say that? - I just know that she said that he done some jobs for her but, then, I was never in that part of it.
Right.
Well, you know, they'll take the hold off the check once they've established that it wasn't your prints on that medicine cabinet.
Do we have your prints on file for any reason? - No.
Uh-uh.
No.
- Okay.
I tell you what, Leon.
Let's take some prints from you real quick.
That way, we rule you out.
- My boss, he gets off my back.
- All right.
Make sure I give them back once we run the check.
Otherwise, they'll be in the computer.
- You don't want that.
- Hey, I was never in that part of the apartment.
You remind me, though, 'cause I'm gettin' to where I'd lose my head if it wasn't attached.
- Yeah.
Okay.
- Let's go downstairs and do this.
Yeah.
- Yeah? - Miss Archer, detectives.
Your employer, Mr.
Delva, gave us your address.
- Yeah.
- We need to ask you some questions.
- Questions about what? - We were told you dated a guy named Jay Dolinky.
- He went away to prison.
- I haven't seen him.
- Did you know he's out of jail? - No.
You know this Carl Maclntyre, right? He's who you're dating now? He was just a guy keepin' me company.
Oh, you said was.
" You're not seein' him anymore? I was never really seein' him at all.
- These yours? - No.
They're my sister's boyfriend's.
- She around? - No.
If you're withholding information on this guy, that puts you in the middle.
I talked toJay once on the telephone since he's been out and told 'im we're through.
- That's all I know.
- Carl Maclntyre the bouncer you were only keeping company with? - He's dead now.
- I haven't talked toJay.
So this Jay goes off on a homicide spree just off a phone call? Hey, you're the one makin' all the connections, all right? I don't know if he had anything to do with Carl.
- I don't know if he had anything to do with anything.
- What's in here, huh? Back off! Back off! I'm walkin' out of here, or her head's comin' off, man! - Take it easy.
Don't hurt the girl.
- Don't do nothin' stupid.
No way I'm goin' back to jail! No way! No way! - You hurt the girl, you're gonna die today.
- Son of a bitch! You wild bastard! I'll get the gun.
- You okay? - Yeah.
- He's not.
- I'll call E.
M.
S.
- Hey.
- Hey.
Heard you had quite an adventure.
Yeah.
Our guy's downstairs in holding.
Well, everyone's in holding patterns for interview rooms.
- That kid Billy's up in your crib.
- Hope he don't rearrange things.
I'll let you know when an interview room opens up.
- Hey, nice goin', guys.
- Yeah.
It was somethin', Lieu.
I mean, that guy come out of that bedroom like Dillinger.
The girl who hits him wants to take the entrance exam for the job.
- I bet.
- She just about knocked him cold with an ashtray.
Okay.
Yeah.
Thanks a lot.
- Handyman's our guy.
- Is that right? B.
C.
I.
Says the prints he gave you is a match with the blood prints on the doorknob.
Lieu, the nephew- He didn't do it.
It was this guy Broadus.
- So what else are you holding the nephew for? - Trying to steal a camera.
Your call on letting him go.
Try to move the handyman.
You're not confident a jury'll convict off conclusive blood evidence? - You want me to wait till you're through with the nephew? No.
Get started.
Diane, if he's not bumping into the boss when AndyJ.
Gets back, you wanna tell him to go to the observation room? - All right.
- Thanks.
- I'm glad you weren't hurt picking that guy up.
- Yeah.
Got a little exciting out there.
Should we have that talk, Adrianne? Well, I've wanted to since you were staying at your parents' house and then when you agreed today, I sat here thinking, you know why should I make you put it into words? I mean, it's pretty clear that you don't want us keeping company any longer.
Yeah, that's accurate- you know, how things worked out.
- I'm very sorry.
- I am as well.
I wanted to open my heart, I wanted to make you happy but instead, I was possessive and suspicious.
- Why do you think that happened? - Maybe it's in my family.
- My father's like that with my mom.
- Yeah.
It seems like most of the guys you went out with were like that- all but me.
- I feel like such a failure.
- Don't say that, Adrianne.
I'd ask for another chance to change, but I made promises to myself repeatedly when we were going out, and the next day I'd act the same.
Adrianne, don't beat yourself up.
I'm always gonna be your friend.
Same here, James.
So, I guess we had our talk.
At least we didn't break any crockery.
- That's different than my parents.
- Yeah.
Hey, come here.
Hold my hand.
- He's sick.
- Give me a minute with him.
- How you feelin', Billy? - I'm all right.
We found out you were telling the truth, Billy.
It was some handyman that killed your aunt.
Yeah.
I just robbed her.
We're not gonna file charges.
That camera we caught you boostin', we'll just return that as found property.
It's your aunt's jewelry.
You can get her buried, see to her arrangements or you can put it up your arm.
I can go now? Hey, do the right thing, man, all right? You come back after the funeral, and I'll get you in a program.
- I'm a junkie.
- Who do you think are in those programs? Afterwards, some of'em are ex-junkies.
I know you're gonna follow this soon, Leon.
What Detective Simone said to you, that we found prints on the bedroom medicine cabinet No, he said that that was the only place you were lookin' that my prints would get compared.
And what I'm trying to get you to understand That detective could've told you that we were only lookin'on Neptune.
What he said we wanted those prints for, it don't matter.
But I cooperated based on that detective Iyin' to me.
I thought you were pickin' up your uniform from the tailors.
Yeah.
He's gonna shorten the sleeves a little.
Him misleading you on those prints, that's called permissible deception, Leon.
We in law enforcement, we're allowed to do that when an innocent guy wouldn't be harmed and a suspect's enough of a moron to go for it.
You qualify.
The print in the woman's blood's yours.
You had it on your hands.
You killed her! What are you guys pullin' now, huh? You stay there.
Sylvia beeped 911.
" - Go ahead.
I'll close this guy.
- He knows about the blood.
He's almost done pissin' and moanin' at how he got tricked into givin' up his prints.
You got him.
I was watching in observation.
You wanna ride with your dad? - You want I should ride with you, Pop? - You wanna take a ride with me? Let's go.
Donna, could you sign me out to the hospital? - Sylvia beeped 911.
" - Sure, Detective.
- And you'll tell the boss? - Here we go.
- I'll have a good thought.
Come on, Andy.
We're in a rush.
- I'll tell Fancy.
- Thanks very much.
How are you, Mr.
Comstock? Uh, well, thank you, but as regards your offer I'm very appreciative, but I'm going to decline.
It's a combination of factors.
I've never heard that- relocation remorse"- but that is an element.
I guess there'd be no harm in that.
Tonight's not possible.
I have a season-long commitment to the New York Rangers.
Really? Uh, all right.
I'll see you between the first and second periods just where the Zambonis leave the ice.
All right, sir.
Mm-hmm.
- Excuse me.
- Andy.
- Sylvia, where you goin'? - The delivery room.
- Where's your doctor? - He's got a forceps delivery.
He'll be comin' right over.
- This is my husband, Andy.
- Jane Mackey.
- That's my son, AndyJr.
- Hi, AndyJr.
- How's it goin'? - Good.
You know, my brother's a cop in the 27.
- Eddie Mackey? Heavyset guy? - That's him.
- Detective.
Sylvia's progressing a little faster than we expected, but, uh that sometimes happens with older primips.
- I don't know what you're talkin' about.
- Women past 30 having their first child.
- Here comes a contraction! - We're gonna set her up in here, see where we stand and then you can come in and be with her.
- You okay? - I'll be fine after I have an epidural! She wants- She needs her epidural! - What's an epidural? - I don't like this guy's attitude.
- What? The doctor? He's fine.
- Jewish guy.
They talk to you like you're seven.
- She's got confidence in him.
That's the main thing.
- Pop, take it easy.
She's got confidence in him.
That's all I care - Whoa.
Where are you going? - I'm Dr.
Zisk.
I'm the anesthesiologist.
- Uh-uh.
My wife's in there.
- I'm gonna give her an epidural.
Uh, yeah, go ahead.
She was askin'for that.
Go ahead.
I'm okay.
I'm right here, hon.
Must be a type of pain procedure.
Oh, brother.
They must need an epidural down there.
Okay, Detective.
Let's get you gowned up.
You wanna come with me? - Did you talk to your wife about your son being present? - No.
- I'll just wait outside.
- You just have to put on a gown if you want to be in the room.
- I'll be fine outside.
- All right.
Well, let's go.
- Where we going? - Down here.
Guard the door there.
Andy, stand guard.
- He's a handsome boy.
- Gonna be a cop.
- Oh, yeah? Good for him.
- They're callin' for you, Pop.
They said the baby's comin'.
- Let's go.
- Don't forget your hat.
That's it.
That's it.
Big progress, Sylvia.
Beautiful.
Beautiful.
- What's goin'on? - I feel so much better, Andy.
Your wife is like a peasant woman.
She's just about to deliver.
- Here comes another one.
- Come on, sweetie.
Push two, three, four, five, six.
That's it.
That's it.
- And he's crowning.
- You can see the top of his head.
- Push.
- That's it.
That's it.
- Okay.
Good.
- Two, three, four.
This is the one, Sylvia.
Push! Oh, yes.
Here he is.
Here's your son, Mr.
Sipowicz.
- It's a boy.
- I wanna hold him.
I wanna hold him.
- Oh, yes.
- Dad, you wanna cut the cord? No.
And here comes the placenta.
And we have a gush.
- She's hemorrhaging.
- What's going on? - Go away, Mr.
Sipowicz, please.
- Seventy over 50.
- Thank you.
- What's going on? - Turn up the fluids.
- Make sure she's not too crossed.
- How's my wife? I'm gonna shock the uterus to stop the bleeding.
What the hell is- What are you talkin' about here? Sylvia? Sylvia? - Okay.
Got it.
- Pressure has stabilized.
That's a girl.
You're okay.
- What happened? What happened? - You hemorrhaged, but everything's under control.
- Is the baby okay? - Absolutely.
Everybody's fine.
I wanna hold him.
I wanna hold the baby.
Here we come.
Here we come.
- All right.
- There you go.
Oh.
- Oh, wow.
- That's it.
Here he is, Andy.
Here he is.
- Oh, I know.
- Hey, hey, hey.
Hey, pal.
Healthy baby.
They're both okay.
That's great, Pop.
I'm gonna be spending more time with him 'cause he's just a little guy but don't think I love you no less.