The Time of Our Lives (2013) s01e11 Episode Script

Episode 11

Who came to dinner? Just Ewan.
Ewan! There's nothing going on between us.
Wasn't asking.
What do you think of Alice? She's trying hard to fit in.
Remember, you're going to be away a couple of extra days this time.
It's going to be fun staying with Dad.
Do you think he'll like it? He'll love it.
I think you're gorgeous.
We welcome to the microphone, Mr Wise Crack! Morning! Been good, Herb? I want to try to find my birth mother.
I don't suppose you'd like to come to Vietnam with me? I'd love to.
Are you right? Just about.
I think I'll wait in the car.
Won't be a sec.
No, no, no, no.
Oh, smile Hello! How're you going? Good to see you.
Hi.
Good to see you.
What can I get you? Do you want a wine? Oh, I think I'll just have water, actually.
I'll have a beer in a minute.
How're you going, Dad? Good? What's wrong? You didn't read us a story.
Well, you don't have to have a story every night.
Just one story.
I'll read to them.
I'd like to.
Oh, OK.
Come on.
Come on, you can choose a book for me.
Do you know Caroline? No, not really.
I'm OK, Matt.
You go and talk to your brother.
I'll be down soon.
OK, night-night, girls.
Nighty-nighty, don't let the bed bugs bitey.
Oh, I used to read this when I was a little girl.
It was one of my favourites.
Let's all read together.
Once upon a time It was Matt who changed my name, wasn't it? No, no, it was Luce.
He couldn't get his tongue around Chi Linh for some time so he started calling you Chai Li, Chai Li.
I can remember when we went to pick you up, I got really annoyed because I thought we were going off to play footy.
Matt's always been able to get his priorities right.
True story.
Actually, Matt was a fantastic big brother.
When you were a toddler, he'd take you out in the backyard and you'd follow him around like a little duckling.
So where do you fly into? Ho Chi Minh City.
We'll be spending all our time there.
Are you excited? Very.
Ah, does anyone want a beer? I'm right, thanks.
I'm right.
I'll have a light one, thanks.
Hi.
Hi, Caroline.
Hi, I'm just returning your wallet.
Oh! You left it at my house when you picked up the girls.
I didn't even know I'd lost it.
Thanks.
It was on the kitchen bench.
Oh, thanks for bringing it back.
Stay for a drink? Oh, I'll go.
Stay for a glass.
Come on.
OK, thanks.
Thank you.
Thanks.
I think they're asleep.
Hello.
Hello.
You OK? I just wish Caroline and I could get along.
It's not an easy situation for any of you.
I just wish she wasn't so angry.
Well, I think that might take quite a long time.
Yeah, I understand that.
It sounds so weird but I have a secret fear that I might find my birth mother and she won't like me.
Oh, that's not going to happen.
No.
How could that happen? She'll love you.
Why don't we have a toast? To a successful Do you want to wait for Alice? Sure.
Here, I'll take that.
Grab a drink.
To a successful trip and a great adventure.
Chai Li! Cheers, Chai Li.
Cheers.
Hey, I want to get a family photo.
I'll go.
No, stay for the photo.
Stay for the photo.
Come on, everyone.
Come on, Dad, you have to get up.
OK, I'm ready.
Cheezu.
Cheezu! Again.
Come on! Cheezu! Huh? Huh? I think you'd have to agree that I am a bit of freak of nature.
I agree with that statement.
Uh-uh, don't hate the player, Chai Latte, hate the game.
Oh! Uh-oh, look out.
Oh, I like those moves.
Look out.
Look out 'cause it's gonna jump.
Watch out! It's gonna jump! Oh! Whoo! Think you'd have to agree, you're lucky to know a man like me.
Yeah! Hey.
Hi! How are ya? Hey.
Good.
Good trick.
Thanks.
Hi.
Hey.
How are you? Just came to say goodbye.
What time's your flight tomorrow? Eight.
Yeah.
Eight o'clock.
You want to come to my room? I want to show you some stuff.
Sure.
So what do you want to show me? Anything else? I'm not sure.
Has he gone? Yeah.
He knew I had to get up early.
Is it safe to sit here? Oh, shut up.
What time you being picked up? Not till five.
Your last name's Tran? Tran Chi Linh.
Chi Linh? Well, actually, Chi is my middle name.
Linh is my first name.
When did you leave Vietnam? 4th April 1975.
So you were only in the orphanage for a month? Yep.
Hey, good luck with everything.
Will you miss me? Come here.
OK, as we speak, Herb is being hooked up to a state-of-the-art lie detector machine.
What could go wrong? Right.
OK, Bam-Bam, fire away.
Herb.
Yeah.
Have you ever been fired from a job? No.
Ooh! OK, yes, twice.
Sorry, no.
No, no, no, three times.
I forgot about the singing telegram gig.
Oh, let's not go there.
OK, Herb.
Yeah.
Have you ever had a man crush? No.
Not that I can recall.
Herb, I'm going to have to ask you to really think.
OK, yes.
Oh! Oh, he's unbelievable.
OK, was your man crush George Clooney? - No.
- Ooh! OK.
OK, OK, was it Ian Thorpe? No.
OK, OK.
Justin Bieber? No! No! Bieber fever! He's a belieber! No, no, I don't know why the machine buzzed.
I think we do.
I'm more of a Guy Sebastian man.
No, I am.
Get this off me.
Take it off me.
You've got to admit, that was damn funny.
Alright, it was funny.
That machine is bloody amazing.
I had the buzzer.
Are you You were putty in my hands.
Are you serious? Yeah.
What, did you think you were actually hooked up to a real lie detector machine? Oh, geez.
OK, that's it from us.
We're going to hot foot it out of here because today we're taking our brand-new publicity photos.
Herb, what's your best side? Ah, my backside.
Alright, see you later.
See you tomorrow.
Hoo-roo.
That's good.
Well done.
I love it.
Where are the posters going to go? Everywhere, mate.
It's part of the new campaign.
Bus shelters, billboards, magazines.
Maximum saturation.
Sweet.
OK, guys, ready to go.
Can I have everyone come over? Now, Gaz, I'll have you in the middle.
We'll do a few variations today.
Yep.
Now I'll have Herb and Bam-Bam piggy-backing each other and I'll have Gaz, you in the middle.
That's great.
Perfect.
OK, here we go.
Great.
Lovely.
Fantastic.
Like that.
Great.
Good, great work, great.
That's good.
That's good.
I love it.
That's good.
Let's try something else.
Keep that up.
Good work.
Well done.
Fantastic.
Good.
Great.
I think I've pretty much got what I want.
Alright, are we still doing the nude shots? If you're up for it, yeah.
What? Oh, mate, we always do them.
I don't always do them.
Mate, it's for charity.
Everyone in radio does it.
We put out a calendar to raise money for prostate cancer research.
I don't reckon I'll help your sales.
No way, mate.
One in, all in.
Go nude up, we'll meet you back here.
You doing it, Bam-Bam? Do it every year.
OK.
Hello? Got you, man! Garrick! Alright, yep, yep, thank you.
Thank you.
Alright.
Good.
It's from Vu Thi Mai, the woman who worked at the orphanage where I was.
She can meet us tomorrow.
Oh, great.
Let's go settle in.
It's a big city, isn't it? Different to last time I was here.
This woman we've got to meet, where have we got to go? She'll meet us at the park near the Reunification Palace.
It's about ten minutes from here.
But during the war she worked at the Tan Phong Orphanage where I was.
OK, well, that's got tomorrow sorted.
Now let's eat.
OK.
Impressive, Dad.
Well, a bit rusty but I still remember a few things.
How long were you here for? 12 months.
I wonder what would have happened to me if I hadn't come to Australia.
What would I be doing? You probably wouldn't have survived.
Most of you kids were pretty sick when you came over.
Hey, cheers, Dad.
Cheers.
And it's seven minutes to the hour.
Now, boys, this morning on the show I want to talk phobias, yeah.
What about you, Herb? Got any phobias? Anything that terrifies you? Ah I don't think I do.
Oh, mate.
Don't big-note yourself.
There's gotta be something.
Ah, yeah, I can't think.
Bam-Bam? Dogs.
I was bitten when I was a kid.
Do not walk down the street with him.
If a chihuahua comes round the corner, Bam-Bam jumps into your arms like a frightened little rabbit.
Those dogs are so not cute.
Have you got a phobia, Gaz? Uh, yeah, yeah.
Grasshoppers.
Yeah, no, no, no, those little buggers are unpredictable.
Seriously, they terrify the bejesus out of me.
Hey, wait, wait, what don't you like about them? Have you ever had a close look at a grasshopper? Their faces, old man faces.
They're not right.
Mate, you left me high and dry out there.
I don't actually have a phobia.
Do I give a flying? Make it up.
Do you think Bam-Bam actually got bitten by a dog? Actually, I was.
Well, you're not scared of chihuahuas.
I don't love them.
It's a game, Herb.
Alright.
You gotta put yourself out there.
Right.
And we are back.
Time to go to our first caller.
Thanks for this.
I don't know why the school organises these meetings on my day off.
Hey, Bernadette? Yeah? Can I ask you something? Sure.
How come we don't do kids' dinners anymore? Well, I don't know.
When Matt left, I didn't realise I was breaking up with all of you.
You're not.
Are you upset about the other night? Well, it's just that it made it very clear that I'm not a part of the family anymore.
I just feel like Alice has been slotted in right where I used to be.
Alice in, Caroline out.
That's not true.
We're all just finding our way.
I'm sorry, I've got to go.
Taxi! There were many, many babies at the orphanage.
People were hungry, sick and scared that their children would die.
Must have been terrible.
Lots of smoke and gunfire.
We put you on plane to go to Australia.
And then, very quickly, 15 minutes, you were all gone.
The orphanage was bombed near the end of the war.
All gone.
Now a new building there.
What about the records? Gone in bombing.
No more.
Nothing.
What do you think I should do to try to find my birth mother? Her name no good.
In Vietnam, many people have the same name.
Use this number.
Go to police station.
Maybe the one near the orphanage.
They might keep the records of your mother.
OK.
I-I don't speak Vietnamese.
I'm Australian.
Do you speak English? A little.
I was adopted from here, Vietnam, in 1975.
This is the adoption paperwork and on it is my mother's identity number.
We thought you could help us find her by looking at that number.
Sorry, no record.
Do you do you have a current address for this person? Tran Thi Hanh.
This is her identity number.
Don't have.
Look Don't have.
Please, please, could you check for me? No good.
Let's try somewhere else.
OK.
No luck, eh? So, you're settling in alright, yeah? Mm, yeah, it's great.
I'm loving it.
You should make it your own.
Take it where you want to take it, you know? You've got a pretty good feel for what it is we do.
Come up with your own stuff.
Push the envelope.
I'd really like that.
Anything off-limits? Anything management would balk at? Hey, what do you reckon? They talk pretty tough but in the end, if the ratings are fine, they're cool with it.
Great.
I've got a couple of ideas.
Yeah, good.
Great.
Uh, sweetie? We seem to be missing a wine list! No, no, didn't get it.
Got one! I can see one, I can see one, I can see one.
Yes! Got it, got it, got it, got it.
Quick! Quick! Quick, open the box.
What do we actually need them for? ,Well that's for me to know and for you to find out.
Dude, alright? Oh-oh! Wow.
Pretty cool, huh? Yeah, you're famous! Here, give me your phone.
I'll take a photo.
Yes, good call.
Good call.
Here, we go, ready? Say me.
Me! We've been to eight police stations and so far, nothing.
Do you know anyone else from the orphanage who might remember my mother? Thank you.
Yes, please do.
Thanks so much, Mai.
Mai said she'd contact me if she can think of anyone else who could help us.
Oh, good.
How old were you when you were in the war? I was just 20.
I flew in one like this.
I was a door gunner.
We'd fly out of Nui Dat.
Yeah.
We'd have to drop the boys off.
I'd have to shoot out the area first.
Were you scared? Sometimes.
We'd come back to pick them up, the wounded first, then our dead.
And a week later, we'd drop the boys back in and they'd have to clear the exact same area again.
Pointless.
So, any more police stations? There's a couple not far from here.
Well, look, you go on.
I think I'm going to have a bit more of a look around.
Well, I can wait.
No, no, no, you go on.
I'll meet you back at the hotel.
OK.
Thanks.
See you.
How'd you go? Nothing.
Why did you adopt a baby from Vietnam? Well, when I was here I saw lots of children living on the streets.
The orphanages were packed.
So when Rosa decided that she wanted to adopt a child I couldn't think of a single reason not to.
Hasn't turned out too badly, eh? It's turned out pretty well.
Dad, are you OK? Yeah, I'm just getting a glass of water.
Being back here's brought back a lot of memories.
What do you mean? Nothing for you to worry about.
Go back to bed, love.
Dad, what's going on? Nothing, nothing.
Please talk to me.
I just keep remembering this one time we flew out to pick up some wounded.
There was a lot of confusion and shouting over the radios.
Bullets were hitting the chopper.
You couldn't even hear 'em, it was that noisy.
And out of nowhere this girl, about 16, appeared running right at us.
She had her hand up in the air.
Her fist was clenched.
Was she running from the fire fight or did she have a grenade? I cut her down.
She fell.
Not graciously like you see in the movies.
Awkwardly.
Her arms and her legs splayed at strange angles.
We took off and I just kept staring at her.
She never moved again.
And it's 7:39.
Stay with us 'cause when we come back, we're gonna talk footy! Football! I'm going for a slash.
How long have I got? Ah, at least five minutes.
Got the song and weather.
What's that? A little surprise for Gaz.
You've got the camera, Lorna? Slight change of plans this morning.
Um, you remember, Bam-Bam, Gaz was telling us he's scared of grasshoppers? Mmm.
Well, I've collected a few and when Gaz comes back in, we're going to release them.
Let's see how bad this phobia of Gaz's really is.
Georgie! Hey, Georgie, come here! I think your grasshoppers are on the radio.
OK, let's talk football.
We've got Nick on the line.
Nick, what the hell is the problem with St Kilda? I think it's the coach, Gaz.
Yeah? He doesn't know his arse from his elbow, mate.
The sooner they get rid of him, the better, I reckon.
Is it the coach, though? I mean, the coach can only work with what he's got and that seems to be the problem here.
I mean, the best coaches in the world can't change a bunch of average players into great players There's no way out now.
Right.
It's time to find out just how bad Gaz's phobia really is so we've just let 20 grasshoppers loose in the studio.
OK, Frank, I-I'm sorry, mate.
I'm going to have to, uh I-I'm gonna have to interrupt there.
W-We need to go to a song.
OK.
OK.
Yeah, I got it.
I'm so sorry.
I can't find the key.
Guys, open the door! This hurts me more than it hurts you, I promise.
Please, open the door.
Herb, I'm begging you, open the door! I'm in pain here! I'm so sorry.
There he goes.
Get off me! Oh, my God! Is he faking that? I don't think so.
Oh, go to the track.
Go to a track.
Unlock the door.
Unlock the door now! Gaz, are you alright? Gaz! Ring triple O! He's OK.
Oh, thank God.
It was a panic attack and then he fainted.
But they're going to take him to hospital anyway just to check things out.
This number from old regime.
So how can I find someone with this number? It impossible.
All the old regime records, all destroyed.
Years ago.
Everyone now issued new number.
But how can I find someone with this number, then? No, you can't.
So this number is useless? Mm, yeah.
I'm not going to find her, am I? Look, you've done your best.
Do you think the twins would like these? I wouldn't mind trying some of that food.
Smells delicious.
You don't even know what it is.
Oh, well, half the fun's in trying.
Look, Dad, I don't want to have fun.
I'm going back to the hotel.
OK.
I'll see you back there.
Hello? Oh, hi, Mum, it's me.
Hi, darling.
How's it going? Not so good.
What's wrong? What's happened? It's nothing.
It's just we haven't found anything.
Nothing.
It's alright.
Don't cry.
It's been a hard year, chicken.
And it would have been a blessing had you found something this trip but I know.
You can't let this knock you over.
Not after what you've been through with Joel.
This is different.
This is about who I am.
I'm just disappointed.
That's all.
'Course you are.
Carmody! Hey, I'm sorry about the other night at Luce's.
I appreciate how awkward that must have been for you.
Uh, I doubt it.
Oh, well.
Carmody, come on.
Dad's going to take you the park.
Hello, you! How are ya? I'm Matt.
Hi, I'm Jed.
Come on, Carmody, let's go.
Hey, can I have a kiss first? Oh, you'd better.
I want Higgins! Oh, Higgins.
Here he is! Higgins! Oh, there he is.
Hey, um, how old is that guy? Why? Oh, I'm just interested.
How old is he? Oh, I think he's about the same age as Alice.
Touche.
Come on, you.
See ya! See ya.
There's a small town north of here, Tay Ninh.
I read about it in the guide books.
Why don't we go up there and spend the night, then come back here and go straight to the airport tomorrow? Well, I was thinking of going back to the area around the orphanage site and talking to some local people.
Someone might remember something.
OK, well, let's go together.
Mai! What are you here? Hi.
Hello.
I'm coming to find you.
I spoke to my nephew.
He works for the government.
He will help you.
That's fantastic! Let's go.
We can walk from here? Yeah.
Can I have a look at your mother's identity number? This number from the old regime.
I know.
That's the problem.
Most of them have been destroyed but this office may have kept some copies of the old numbers.
Can I take this? OK.
You wait here.
I have some news.
What? Uh, well, you might get a shock.
What? You're going to be a dad.
Again.
What? I did the test.
Here it is.
I thought you were on the pill.
Well, I was but I guess something went wrong.
Please say you're happy.
Well, yeah, I'm happy, it's just a bit of a shock.
I'm happy.
I love you.
It's been half an hour.
Is that a good sign? Maybe.
Here he is.
It was difficult but I found your mother's number and it matches the name that you gave me, Tran Thi Hanh.
What about an address? I have an address and a telephone number.
Are they current? I think so.
Can I have them? No, but I can call her and see if she wishes to speak to you.
Yes.
Yes, please do that.
I'll call you if I make contact with her.
Here's the hotel's number.
Call us anytime.
Anytime at all.
OK.
Thank you so much for everything.
The station manager called.
Apparently, I'm not required at work tomorrow.
I asked if I could come and pick up my jacket and notebook and he said he'd courier them.
I'm sorry, Herb.
Georgie said it was funny.
It was hilarious.
Georgie and I were laughing so hard, I just about had tears rolling down my face.
I think the gravity of the situation may have cancelled out the hilarity.
Well, there's other stations.
You know, if anyone heard it, they would have been laughing.
They might want to poach you.
Hello! Hello? Hi! Come in! I brought kids' dinner.
Spaghetti bolognaise.
It's Thursday night.
We always have kids' dinner on Thursday night, don't we? Come on in.
Hey, girls.
Caroline? Yeah? Is Carmody here? He sure is.
Ta-da! These are my rocks.
Guess who this one is? It's Popcorn.
This one's Grandma.
- Who's ready for dinner? - Me! So what's the vibe in at the station? Well Any chance I can grovel my way back in? Unlikely.
Gaz told me to stretch myself, to go out on my own.
But you see, these are the rules.
Gaz pranks you - funny.
You prank Gaz - not funny.
Well, I've worked that out.
What about you and I form a team? See if we can get a gig somewhere else? Mate, I've got four kids and a $600,000 mortgage.
Gaz is my meal ticket.
But you hate him.
Well, I've made a deal with the devil.
Did you realise the devil was such a knob? I'm thinking about ordering some room service or shall we go out? I'd rather stay, in case he calls.
Can I order you something? I'll have a sandwich.
A sandwich? No way.
Not in Vietnam.
Well, why don't you order, Dad? Well, I won't be ordering a sandwich.
How about something with chilli and coconut? Hello? Yes.
Uh, yes.
Yes.
Mm-hm.
OK.
Hey, Chai Li, it's me.
Just wondering how you're going.
Hope everything's good.
See you soon.
Bye.
Mm-hm.
Uh, yes, we can come now.
Yes, yes, I do.
On the back of my head.
Oh, thank Thank you so much.
That was him.
He rang the phone number and he spoke to the woman and she wanted to know if I had scars on the back of my head.
I do, don't I? Yep.
You had ulcers when you arrived.
They left scars.
She wants us to come to her house now.
Well, let's go.
Oh, hang on a sec, Dad.
Just give me a minute to get changed.
I want to look nice for her.
That's the house.
Thank you.
Can you show me your arm? It's you.
You are my daughter.
You are my daughter.
This is your father.
How old was he when I was born? 20.
He was an American soldier at the base where I worked.
What happened to him? I don't know.
Could he still be alive? If he were alive, he would have come and found us.
May I please take this photo to copy it? Keep it.
Can I invite you for dinner? Yes, we'd love to.
Come on.
Ooh! Sorry.
Dad might like that.
OK.
Which is the mother who adopted you? There.
Her name is Rosa.
She looks beautiful.
And they're my brothers and their partners.
Very good-looking.
What is my father's name? His name was Bobby Hudson.
Did he ever meet me? Yes, he did.
He was so proud to have a daughter.
He sent this letter.
'My darling, I am now in Xuan Loc.
I am sorry that Chi Linh is sick.
I hope you can find medicine to make her well.
Can you take her to the doctor and show him the ulcers on her head? I'm sure he will help her.
I miss you and Chi Linh.
Kiss-kiss, hug-hug.
Love, Bobby.
' You had a fever and we didn't have any medicine.
My mother, she thought you were going to die.
And maybe in the orphanage you might live.
I have missed so much.
We're just leaving the hotel now.
And how's our little girl? On top of the world.
Oh, good.
Look, I'll give you a call when we've landed.
See you at the airport.
Bye, darling.
Bye-bye, love.
Chai Li.
Thank you.
Thanks.
Hello.
I wanted to say goodbye.
I don't know when I'll see you again.
Soon.
Soon.
Thank you for looking after my baby and thank you to Rosa too.
It's been an honour.
I'll take the luggage out.
I will come back soon.
I promise.
Yes.
This is a gift for you.
It's a necklace that my mother gave to me and now, I'm giving it to you, my only daughter.
Thank you.
It's beautiful.
I have a question for you.
Yes, what? Can you forgive me for putting you in the orphanage? Yes.
Yes.
I want you to know that a few weeks after Saigon fell, I went back to the orphanage but there was nothing there.
Nothing.
I asked a woman in the street, what happened to the babies? She said, they all died.
I fainted on the ground and when I woke up I hoped it had all been a dream.
But it wasn't.
So from when I was 23 until now I believed my baby was dead.
My daughter.
A good trip? Great.
And I'm dying to hear all about it.
It was amazing.
What is your mother like? Oh, she's lovely and beautiful and everything.
Hey.
Hey! I've missed you.
Thanks.
Hey, come here, you.
Hey.
Now, look what we've got here.
OK.
Here we go.
And you've got the light filtering through that.
Isn't that a nice effect? It's beautiful.
We'd pretty much given up hope and then everything turned around.
Is that her? That's her.
I met my grandmother and an aunty and an uncle.
My mother, my birth mother, she gave this to me.
Oh, that's beautiful.
Her mother gave it to her and now she's given it to me.
Oh.
So, what'd you get me? What'd you get me? What'd you get me? Uh, 2,000 Dong? Thousand Dong? That's a lot of Dong.
How much is that in Australia? I don't know, ten cents.
Cheap.
They build you up, then they rip you down.
Literally.
Hi.
Yeah, it was amazing.
Oh, yeah, come over now.
I'll be home in a couple of minutes.
OK.
Ewan's coming over.
Excellent.
Is Alice pregnant? Uh, yes.
So quick.
Do you still see me as being in the family? Yes, I do.
Why are your parents even going there for dinner? They're never going to accept me.
I don't really know why you left me.
Should we talk about this later? I'd like to know.
Hanh's asked me to come back to live with them for a few months to get to know them.
Can't you see how she feels? I don't need to, do I? I've got you to tell me.
Luce.